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Re: Restoring an Old Electrical Motor - Charles Jackson III - 02-17-2011

Nice job on the motor.


Re: Restoring an Old Electrical Motor - Tapper - 02-18-2011

Wonderful job and great pics and documentation of the process - I thoroughly enjoyed it! I have a 5 HP Dewalt three phase motor to break down and install new bearings in, coming up (which will be a "first" for me) and this was a good primer.

Doug


Re: Restoring an Old Electrical Motor - skizzo - 05-31-2011

Bump to go with its companion thread.


Re: Restoring an Old Electrical Motor - BaileyNo5 - 06-01-2011

skizzo said:


Bump to go with its companion thread.



Thanks for the bump, it brought the thread to my attention. Great rebuild and really nice pics and documentation!


Re: Restoring an Old Electrical Motor - MrMhor - 01-08-2012

Needed to reference this thread again, so figured I'd bump it.

Cheers,
Andrew


Re: Restoring an Old Electrical Motor - Matt42 - 01-08-2012

MrMhor said:


Needed to reference this thread again, so figured I'd bump it.

Cheers,
Andrew



And thanks for doing so. It's timely for me. I need to rebuild a U.S. made 220 volt evaporative cooler motor that lasted 19 years. I think that it just needs new bronze bushings. New motors--even from A.O. Smith are from China. The old one can be maintained and lubricated.


Re: Restoring an Old Electrical Motor - skizzo - 04-13-2012

anudder bump to keep this one with the other thread that came back up.


Re: Restoring an Old Electrical Motor - Barry - 04-13-2012

This was fun to follow. Not quite as good as being there and getting immersed in that aroma of WD-40, but close.

I used wrinkle finish many times in the distant past and remember it was fascinating to watch that paint dry. And back then I even had a life.




Re: Restoring an Old Electrical Motor - timo1112 - 05-29-2012

Hi , glad you've kept this subject going. I stumbled onto this site via and internet search concerning a walker turner motor that I have removed from my TA1180B table saw, in an effort to find how to repair so that I won't have to start my saw with a piece of wood to get the blade going. Long story shorter, 1 belt was gone, 1 was in shreds, and only one was left. The saw bogged down during a resaw process, and could not finish the job, so I decided, while I had the motor out, I would take it to a motor repairman to have the capacitor tested.(it would only buzz when I turned it on, thus the encouragement from a piece of wood to get the blade going. I first dismantled the motor somewhat, as the repairman said that if I had 1 free wire from the capacitor, he could test it. He did, it measured a little high, given the specs on the capacitor, and he said that probably was not the issue. I told him that I had blown a LOT of sawdust out of the motor before I brought it to him. He thought that the sawdust could likely be the reason it was buzzing but not running, and that I should clean it up as much as possible, put it back on the saw, and try it. As I was reassembling, I noticed that two springs on one side of the centrifugal mechanism were broken. Not being a motor expert, I went ahead and put the motor back together. Before I installed it, I turned it on, got up running without an issue, and when I turned it off, the rotor took 20 seconds or longer to stop rotating. Great! I thought, sounds pretty good, hooray. I turned it on a while later, and it hesitated briefly before getting up and running. Oops , darn! I put it back on the saw anyway, decided to try it. No, it wouldn't go, I couldn't even spin the blade with a piece of wood, now that I had 3 fresh belts.
I'm sure that the rotating mechanism is the problem here, the inside windings, contacts, and wires were looking pretty good.
My question is, does anyone know where I might find a surplus or new centrifugal mechanism for this motor ? I have checked with Jeff at Walker-Turner Serviced Machinery, LLC. He does not have any for the 1HP motors; only has some for the smaller motors, which have lighter weight springs. So much for making a long story short!
I really enjoyed the walker turner drill press and motor rebuild and appreciate the time and effort you took, Skizzo, to do it and to share it. It turned out fantastic, especially the motor, and made me realize how much I'd rather save this old motor than replace it, unless I end up with no alternative. I have a new found appreciation for my vintage tools, which before, were just ones I could afford rather than new ones. Any help or advice would be much appreciated!! Thanks!
Quote:




Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle. Plato


Re: Restoring an Old Electrical Motor - K. L McReynolds - 05-30-2012

Another wat to remove a bearing from a blind casting.

Get/make a hardwood or steel punch the sane size(.003" smaller) than the inside race diameter. Get a blob of thick grease. Pack the grease in the bearing hole and fill the cavity behind the bearing.

Stick the punch in the bearing, tap with a hammer. Non compressible grease forces the bearing out.