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Big Ripsaw and Crosscut saw project - Printable Version

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Re: Big Ripsaw and Crosscut saw project: The saw plates - MarvW - 04-03-2012

Dom,

Keep in mind there are two radiuses on the end of the blade. The large one you speak of plus a smaller one below.

A fine tooth 8" circular blade ground thinner with a post grinder in a lathe will do the job. But it would have to be hollow ground by a few thousands on each side of the blade to prevent over heating as you raise the blade.

Leif Hanson offers a different way of accomplishing that slot. He suggests sawing in a wider slot off center, then glue in a thin piece of veneer on the one side and use the handsaw blade to hold it in place while you clamp it until the glue sets.

Once you get the large radius cut in, you then have that smaller one to contend with, that is if you want to replicate the Disston design exactly.


Re: Big Ripsaw and Crosscut saw project: The saw plates - Brian K - 04-03-2012

Dom, would it be possible to use a slitting cutter like this?
http://www.anchortools.com/product.php?product=303

That's about 10" in diameter and 2mm thick. I know the bore hole is a bit larger, but maybe some type of adapter could be worked up.


Re: Big Ripsaw and Crosscut saw project: The saw plates - Craig D - 04-03-2012

Blacky's Boy said:


I'm curious, has anyone worked with Jatoba before? I've never used it.



I like it, I've used it for saw handles and infills. When oiled, it really glows. It is really hard but works quite well (not brittle). Not oily either, more like purple heart than cocobolo.




Re: Big Ripsaw and Crosscut saw project: The saw plates - Blacky's Boy - 04-03-2012

Thanks Craig. That's good to know.

But "purpleheart"?




I just did an "Indiana Jones" at that one. Purpleheart,....Why does it have to be Purpleheart?

I have a Hate-Hate relationship with that wood. Mostly from my time as a wood turner.


It's brittle, not very pretty, will dull a tool in no time flat, and will give you splinters that defy the laws of physics with their ability to pierce skin and inflict pain.






Re: Big Ripsaw and Crosscut saw project: The saw plates - jossimbyr - 04-03-2012

Blacky's Boy said:


Hey, what the heck can it hurt. right? Let me see what it looks like.

Either way I get to draw it up and have it for everyone else to use.




Done. And from the looks of it, I'm the first person to ever remove the nuts from both of the saws. I only saw a couple of gouges from where previous owners had slipped while tightening the nuts.

Disston No 7 - 28 rip - 5.5ppi






Disston No 7 - 26 inch rip - 6.5ppi







Re: Big Ripsaw and Crosscut saw project: The saw plates - Craig D - 04-03-2012

Blacky's Boy said:


But "purpleheart"?




I just did an "Indiana Jones" at that one. Purpleheart,....Why does it have to be Purpleheart?

I have a Hate-Hate relationship with that wood. Mostly from my time as a wood turner.


It's brittle, not very pretty, will dull a tool in no time flat, and will give you splinters that defy the laws of physics with their ability to pierce skin and inflict pain.







OK, bad choice for comparison, but I meant in how oily the wood is. I have two kinds of purpleheart, one very straight grained, wonderful to plane, turns a nice bland browish, the other is just nasty; impossible to cut without carbide, very interlocked grain, stays purple, very pretty. They both have nasty slivers. Here are all three woods (Jatoba, the two purples) in action:




Re: Big Ripsaw and Crosscut saw project: The saw plates - nazard - 04-03-2012

MarvW said:


Dom,

Keep in mind there are two radiuses on the end of the blade. The large one you speak of plus a smaller one below.

A fine tooth 8" circular blade ground thinner with a post grinder in a lathe will do the job. But it would have to be hollow ground by a few thousands on each side of the blade to prevent over heating as you raise the blade.

Leif Hanson offers a different way of accomplishing that slot. He suggests sawing in a wider slot off center, then glue in a thin piece of veneer on the one side and use the handsaw blade to hold it in place while you clamp it until the glue sets.

Once you get the large radius cut in, you then have that smaller one to contend with, that is if you want to replicate the Disston design exactly.




Dom,

I've used that method on the TS by clamping the handle in a tenoning jig. It works like a charm. The fine adjustment on the jig gets the blade centered just where you want it.

Question: where in hell do you get the energy for all these projects?




Best!

-Jerry


Re: Big Ripsaw and Crosscut saw project: The saw plates - Blacky's Boy - 04-04-2012

nazard said:

Question: where in hell do you get the energy for all these projects?







Eh,...it's not as much as it seems. I just head to the out to the shop in the evenings after spending some time hanging out with my wife and daughter. It's only about an hour (or two) a night. But in the end it all adds up.





Re: Big Ripsaw and Crosscut saw project: The saw plates - Blacky's Boy - 04-04-2012

Disston No.7 Cross cut handle





Disston No.7 Rip handle




Re: Big Ripsaw and Crosscut saw project: The saw plates - jossimbyr - 04-04-2012

Excellent work yet again. One minor quibble: Those are No 7s.