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RE: Stranded Cable in Home Wiring - JTTHECLOCKMAN - 11-21-2017

(11-20-2017, 11:56 PM)Phil Thien Wrote: If you have metal conduit, you can skip the green.  Just get a spool of white and a spool of black.

If your local inspector will allow, Lever Nuts (manufacturer:  Wago) makes a nice interface between stranded (even finely) and solid.

Still need the green. Connections at the outlets and switches can be different if the device is not suitable for stranded wire. Need to use a stakon.


RE: Stranded Cable in Home Wiring - Roly - 11-21-2017

(11-21-2017, 11:01 AM)JTTHECLOCKMAN Wrote: Still need the green. Connections at the outlets and switches can be different if the device is not suitable for stranded wire. Need to use a stakon.

 Twist the stranded wire CCW  wrap the terminal and cut off excess.     The clamp type connections on better receptacles and switches work fine with stranded.   Stranded wire is normally used in conduit rather than solid.  Roly


RE: Stranded Cable in Home Wiring - TDKPE - 11-21-2017

(11-20-2017, 08:18 PM)dwg Wrote: Thanks all for the responses.

SRV52761  I didn't even notice the specs that said max 15 amps.  I do need it for some 20 amps circuits.  I think though that HomeDepot has it wrong.  The Cerro website (near the bottom of the linked page) says its rated for 20 amps...so I think I am good but thank you for pointing that out.
 
  http://www.cerroretail.com/electrical/product-line/building-wire/copper/cabled-thhn/

It's THHN, which is 90C insulation, same as NM (aka Romex).  It's held to 15A or 20A for most applications (but not all) by an obelisk note at the bottom of the NEC table, but there's no reason it shouldn't be good for 20A.  Cerro also makes the same thing in 14 gauge.  Already asked and answered, so I'm just giving you a little more justification.  I'm sure it's a misprint.


RE: Stranded Cable in Home Wiring - Phil Thien - 11-21-2017

(11-21-2017, 11:01 AM)JTTHECLOCKMAN Wrote: Still need the green. Connections at the outlets and switches can be different if the device is not suitable for stranded wire. Need to use a stakon.

No, you don't a separate ground.  Why do you think he needs a separate ground?

I do agree some devices aren't ideal for stranded.  While it is acceptable to wrap stranded around a screw, I actually find doing so to be kind of sloppy and I'd just replace the device with a side-clamping option.

When it is something I cannot easily replace, I just use solid copper pigtails and a Wago Lever-Nut.

Honestly, I wouldn't use stranded I'd just pull solid white and black.  The only time I'd use stranded is if I knew I was going to have a tough pull and limited access.


RE: Stranded Cable in Home Wiring - Bob10 - 11-21-2017

(11-21-2017, 02:20 PM)Phil Thien Wrote: No, you don't a separate ground.  Why do you think he needs a separate ground?

I do agree some devices aren't ideal for stranded.  While it is acceptable to wrap stranded around a screw, I actually find doing so to be kind of sloppy and I'd just replace the device with a side-clamping option.

When it is something I cannot easily replace, I just use solid copper pigtails and a Wago Lever-Nut.

Honestly, I wouldn't use stranded I'd just pull solid white and black.  The only time I'd use stranded is if I knew I was going to have a tough pull and limited access.

I use stranded often but I always pull a ground as some inspectors will demand it.


RE: Stranded Cable in Home Wiring - JTTHECLOCKMAN - 11-21-2017

(11-21-2017, 02:20 PM)Phil Thien Wrote: No, you don't a separate ground.  Why do you think he needs a separate ground?

I do agree some devices aren't ideal for stranded.  While it is acceptable to wrap stranded around a screw, I actually find doing so to be kind of sloppy and I'd just replace the device with a side-clamping option.

When it is something I cannot easily replace, I just use solid copper pigtails and a Wago Lever-Nut.

Honestly, I wouldn't use stranded I'd just pull solid white and black.  The only time I'd use stranded is if I knew I was going to have a tough pull and limited access.

Code, devices can not use pipe as ground. Pipe is a bond not a ground.


RE: Stranded Cable in Home Wiring - JTTHECLOCKMAN - 11-21-2017

(11-21-2017, 01:34 PM)Roly Wrote:  Twist the stranded wire CCW  wrap the terminal and cut off excess.     The clamp type connections on better receptacles and switches work fine with stranded.   Stranded wire is normally used in conduit rather than solid.  Roly

Need to watch this practice. Many locals will not accept. Better to use proper mechanical connectors for future problems. Been there done that and have the shirt.


RE: Stranded Cable in Home Wiring - Phil Thien - 11-21-2017

(11-21-2017, 03:29 PM)JTTHECLOCKMAN Wrote: Code devices can not use pipe as ground


What the heck are you talking about?

Section 250.118 lists fourteen different types of conductors permitted to be used as Equipment Grounding Conductors.  The Equipment Grounding Conductors listed include the following types:
  • Solid and stranded, bare and insulated copper and aluminum conductors.
  • Flexible metal raceways: FMC, LFMC and FMT in lengths up to 6 feet
  • Nonflexible metal raceways and tubing: RMC, IMC, EMT.
  • Cable with protective metallic covering: AC, MC, & Mineral-Insulated Metal Clad cable.  MC cable must provide an effective ground-fault current path.
  • Cable Tray and Cablebus.
  • Other listed metal raceways and listed auxiliary gutters.
  • Surface metal raceway listed for grounding.



RE: Stranded Cable in Home Wiring - Phil Thien - 11-21-2017

(11-21-2017, 02:50 PM)Bob10 Wrote: I use stranded often but I always pull a ground as some inspectors will demand it.

Maybe a CA thing?  I am aware of testing for earthquake survival where compression fittings didn't do as well as the old screw-type.


RE: Stranded Cable in Home Wiring - JTTHECLOCKMAN - 11-21-2017

(11-21-2017, 03:41 PM)Phil Thien Wrote: Do as you wish. I ran many jobs and dealt with many inspectors here in NJ. I would never tell someone to do less. No such thing as overkill. That is what the heck I am talking about expert. 

What the heck are you talking about?

Section 250.118 lists fourteen different types of conductors permitted to be used as Equipment Grounding Conductors.  The Equipment Grounding Conductors listed include the following types:
  • Solid and stranded, bare and insulated copper and aluminum conductors.
  • Flexible metal raceways: FMC, LFMC and FMT in lengths up to 6 feet
  • Nonflexible metal raceways and tubing: RMC, IMC, EMT.
  • Cable with protective metallic covering: AC, MC, & Mineral-Insulated Metal Clad cable.  MC cable must provide an effective ground-fault current path.
  • Cable Tray and Cablebus.
  • Other listed metal raceways and listed auxiliary gutters.
  • Surface metal raceway listed for grounding.