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Sharpening vs Buying New Knives - ajkoontz - 01-28-2019

Looking to get some jointer knives sharpened, and I've noticed that Dynamic Saw has raised their prices substantially since my last time using them. They used to be $0.50/ in and now they are $1.25. It was always almost break-even vs buying new knives after shipping both ways but I didn't mind sending them knowing that what I would be getting a good, sharp edge back from them. Checked over on Holbren and new knives are like $0.81/ in, so it seems the economics of new vs sharpened has changed.

So, I'm looking for leads on sharpening services for jointer knives that are in the $0.50/ in range- if that is even still a thing. I'm probably just going to buy a new set and since my knives aren't nicked I might try honing them, but would be nice to have a more economical sharpening option.


RE: Sharpening vs Buying New Knives - Woodenfish - 01-28-2019

I don’t think there is enough business in tool sharpening today to make a go of it. The overhead is so high that even having a lawnmower blade sharpened is more expensive than to purchase a new one. Sign of the times. I’ve got a stack up sawblades and such that need sharpening yet for some reason I resist and buy new.


RE: Sharpening vs Buying New Knives - jteneyck - 01-28-2019

Sharpen them yourself.  There are several ways of doing it and if they don't have any nicks in them it's pretty fast.  Take a look on YouTube and follow whichever method appeals to you. 

John


RE: Sharpening vs Buying New Knives - Woodenfish - 01-28-2019

Other than removal, replacement or sending out for regrinding due to a larger nick the only methods I’ve seen are for minor honing. I imagine if there is a will there is a way but economics and time sometimes have a priority.


RE: Sharpening vs Buying New Knives - fredhargis - 01-28-2019

I've used Bull Sharpening for over 20 years, and have always had top notch service from them. They are now called 3B saw and tool, not sure if that's a name change or an ownership change. Anyway, I used to pay 50¢/in., and see they now charge 60¢/in. Might want to check them out., their price list is online.


RE: Sharpening vs Buying New Knives - jteneyck - 01-28-2019

(01-28-2019, 02:29 PM)Woodenfish Wrote: Other than removal, replacement or sending out for regrinding due to a larger nick the only methods I’ve seen are for minor honing. I imagine if there is a will there is a way but economics and time sometimes have a priority.

Lots of ways to do it yourself.  Here's one by William Ng  I use waterstones, too, but with a slightly different jig.  In any case, they come out screaming sharp without a lot of effort, maybe 30 minutes per blade to remove, sharpen, and replace, so that's an hour for the 3 blades in my J/P.  

John


RE: Sharpening vs Buying New Knives - Jack01 - 01-28-2019

(01-28-2019, 04:46 PM)jteneyck Wrote: Lots of ways to do it yourself.  Here's one by William Ng  I use waterstones, too, but with a slightly different jig.  In any case, they come out screaming sharp without a lot of effort, maybe 30 minutes per blade to remove, sharpen, and replace, so that's an hour for the 3 blades in my J/P.  

John
John

Watched this video from William NG- great information, excellent jig.
I will make once soon


RE: Sharpening vs Buying New Knives - Admiral - 01-29-2019

A Makita 9820 is the absolute perfect tool for this task; see if you can find one used; they have gotten more and more expensive over the years.  It can be used for other sharpening tasks, but I've never regretted buying mine.

https://www.makitatools.com/products/details/98202


RE: Sharpening vs Buying New Knives - Stwood_ - 01-29-2019

Holbren's prices are very fair on new. My last set of 8" came from him.


RE: Sharpening vs Buying New Knives - Bob Vaughan - 01-31-2019

That question assumes that all HSS knives are the same.  They clearly are not.  Most Asian import knives aren't worth sharpening.  From my experiences with them, they aren't worth the time it takes to install in the first place.  Amana makes good HSS and is worth sharpening.  Some of the German steels are quite good also.  Suppliers to the industrial woodworking shops usually have good knives.  Hobby places, not so much.

They all cut good after sharpening, but some don't last.  One set of 8" jointer knives of Asian import gave me 200 linear feet of cut in maple before I removed them. I tossed them in the trash.  Lesson learned.  The steel was so sorry that it wouldn't even make good scrapers.