#32
  
Well, After 15-20 years of having the parts and plans for the Woodsmith router cabinet, I finally got around to building it. Most of it went well.  I cut all the parts at one time based upon the plans.  But I am not pleased with the way the doors turned out.  First the edge trim for the plywood doors was not cut wide enough which I did not notice until I put them on the door.  Just an 1/8 off but not perfect..  Then when I put the doors on with the piano hinges there was a 3/8 gap at the bottom and a 9/16 gap at the top.  It will do for the router cabinet but I do want to learn for future finer projects. Plus I cut the shelf to hold the dust drawer 1/2 inch to short, which I need to mount the door catches to.

The shelf can be remedied by adding a strip.  I realize I should have cut the edging wider and trimmed with  a plane or router.  Also measure twice and maybe 3 times My guess is that some of the parts, ie the doors,  I should have cut as I went along. A 1/8 here and there can make a big difference.  Any other suggestions or thoughts would be appreciated.  Thanks
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#33
  Learning from mistakes DutchieVB Well, After 15-20 ye...
(08-16-2019, 12:57 PM)DutchieVB Wrote: Well, After 15-20 years of having the parts and plans for the Woodsmith router cabinet, I finally got around to building it. Most of it went well.  I cut all the parts at one time based upon the plans.  But I am not pleased with the way the doors turned out.  First the edge trim for the plywood doors was not cut wide enough which I did not notice until I put them on the door.  Just an 1/8 off but not perfect..  Then when I put the doors on with the piano hinges there was a 3/8 gap at the bottom and a 9/16 gap at the top.  It will do for the router cabinet but I do want to learn for future finer projects. Plus I cut the shelf to hold the dust drawer 1/2 inch to short, which I need to mount the door catches to.

The shelf can be remedied by adding a strip.  I realize I should have cut the edging wider and trimmed with  a plane or router.  Also measure twice and maybe 3 times My guess is that some of the parts, ie the doors,  I should have cut as I went along. A 1/8 here and there can make a big difference.  Any other suggestions or thoughts would be appreciated.  Thanks

Very good. As you've found, it usually isn't wise to cut out all the parts in advance. If you are working from provided by someone else, there could be errors. I recently found an error in dimensions provided for a project in a magazine that would result in the doors being two inches short of being tall enough. The other problem is if you make a small error in your cutting of some parts, that can have a follow-on effect on other parts. At some point you have to start working from what you've built to make sure the dimensions are correct.

In cases where I'm working from plans or just dimensions from someone else, I always go through all of the dimensions and details to make sure they are correct before I cut the first piece of wood.

Also don't assume sheet materials are cut square. Check to make sure original edges are straight and square before using them for reference.
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#34
  Learning from mistakes DutchieVB Well, After 15-20 ye...
One easy way to avoid such drawing errors which are common is to never build anything based on or following strictly the dimensions provided, unless you are a beginner. In fact, I have never built any furniture or shop pieces using someone's measured drawings.

If a drawing specified 4' for something but all your stock was 3'10", you don't go to the lumber yard, do you?

Simon
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#35
  RE: Learning from mistakes Handplanesandmore One easy way to avoi...
(08-17-2019, 09:29 AM)Handplanesandmore Wrote: If a drawing specified 4' for something but all your stock was 3'10", you don't go to the lumber yard, do you?

It depends on what I'm building. If it is specified 4' for a reason, of course you'd go to the yard.
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#36
  RE: Learning from mistakes DaveR1 [quote='Handplanesan...
(08-17-2019, 10:03 AM)DaveR1 Wrote: It depends on what I'm building. If it is specified 4' for a reason, of course you'd go to the yard.
Obviously you missed my point.

Simon
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#37
  Learning from mistakes DutchieVB Well, After 15-20 ye...
(08-16-2019, 12:57 PM)DutchieVB Wrote: ...the edge trim for the plywood doors was not cut wide enough which I did not notice until I put them on the door...when I put the doors on with the piano hinges there was a 3/8 gap at the bottom and a 9/16 gap at the top...I cut the shelf to hold the dust drawer 1/2 inch to short...

You have just learned a valuable lesson about blindly following someone else's plans before gaining a thorough understanding of how each piece relates to the others.
Wood is good. 
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#38
  Learning from mistakes DutchieVB Well, After 15-20 ye...
Simon wrote:
‘ “DaveR1 Wrote:
It depends on what I'm building. If it is specified 4' for a reason, of course you'd go to the yard.”
Obviously you missed my point.’

Or not!
If I ordered something 4’ from you and you delivered 3’10”, I’d reject it and you wouldn’t be hired again because the rationale is arrogant.
Gary

Liberty, Self-Reliance, Self-Responsibility
Say what you'll do and do what you say.
ServicePen 2014
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#39
  Learning from mistakes DutchieVB Well, After 15-20 ye...
"Or not!"

Unbelievable. Don't people know what context is these days anymore?

Simon
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#40
  Learning from mistakes DutchieVB Well, After 15-20 ye...
You’re always right.


Or, not!

*click*
Gary

Liberty, Self-Reliance, Self-Responsibility
Say what you'll do and do what you say.
ServicePen 2014
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#41
  RE: Learning from mistakes Gary G™ You’re always right....
(08-18-2019, 12:27 PM)Gary G™ Wrote: You’re always right.

Yes, I'm -- when I'm right, just like I'm always wrong when I get it wrong. Everyone is like that. anyone who is right but don't think they're...might have a self-confidence issue.

If a drawing said 4 ft for all the sides (of whatever), I would go ahead and build it with 3 ft 10 in sides as that was what I had. Im a woodworker, not a slave to cutting lists or plans. Period.

When someone misses the point, but insists taking things out of context...it's their argument, not mine.

Simon
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Learning from mistakes


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