#42
  
So by next project is going to be this Shaker sideboard (huntboard).  The top picture is Christian Becksvoort's cherry work counter.  I want to build something like this, but with doors and no drawers.  I have scoured the internet to come up with plans and although I do have a measured drawing  (from Christian's book Shaker Inspiration) I have not been able to find more detailed plans.  I am having trouble picturing the case bottom and its joinery to the sides. The front edge of the bottom looks to be a nominal 3/4" thickness. I wonder if this is the front edge of one solid board used for the bottom of the case, or could it be the front edge of a rail that has the rest of the bottom connected to it via a tongue/groove joint?   I have looked at the plans for Garrett Hacks Hunt board, but it has the front lower rail oriented vertically which is different than the front edge of the bottom on the CB work counter.  Any ideas?

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#43
  Shaker Sideboard: Moving on to the Top Philip1231 So by next project i...
Only speculation based on other pieces of Becksvoort's for which I've done plans. I expect the bottom front rail is joined to the legs with tenons and then front to back rails mortised into that front rail and the back rail. Probably the panels are cut with a tongue so they'd be flush with the upper surface of the frame.
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#44
  RE: Shaker Sideboard DaveR1 Only speculation bas...
So the floor of the area behind the door is a frame and panel with the panel flush with the frame on top? I am wondering if the floor of the cabinet can be solid (not frame and panel), fixed in front with tenons into legs and fit into grooves on the sides and back to permit movement front to back?

(04-27-2020, 10:28 PM)DaveR1 Wrote: Only speculation based on other pieces of Becksvoort's for which I've done plans. I expect the bottom front rail is joined to the legs with tenons and then front to back rails mortised into that front rail and the back rail. Probably the panels are cut with a tongue so they'd be flush with the upper surface of the frame.
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#45
  RE: Shaker Sideboard Philip1231 So the floor of the ...
(04-28-2020, 01:19 PM)Philip1231 Wrote: So the floor of the area behind the door is a frame and panel with the panel flush with the frame on top? I am wondering if the floor of the cabinet can be solid (not frame and panel), fixed in front with tenons into legs and fit into grooves on the sides and back to permit movement front to back?

The frame and panel thing is strictly conjecture on my part based on some of the other pieces I do have experience with. I think you could probably get away with a solid bottom. Some of his larger case pieces are built that way. Maybe use stopped sliding dovetails in from the backs of the front legs. The ends into grooves in the lower side rails and loose in a groove on the lower back rail.

Construction or at least assembly might be easier if you make that front rail, say 3/4 in. thick and 1-1/2 in wide and then add the solid bottom behind it in a groove in the back of that rail. That way you could assemble the entire front, the entire back, and add the sides and bottom in between.
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#46
  RE: Shaker Sideboard DaveR1 [quote='Philip1231' ...
Dave;

OK: your explanation just made the light go on (or if you recall the old Grouchy Marx show, the duck just flew down!).

In your second paragraph, this is the approach used by Garret Hack, although he uses a spline between the front rail and the bottom panel.

Excellent: I am on the road to understanding this.

Really appreciate the help: Thanks very much!

Phil

(04-28-2020, 03:03 PM)DaveR1 Wrote: The frame and panel thing is strictly conjecture on my part based on some of the other pieces I do have experience with. I think you could probably get away with a solid bottom. Some of his larger case pieces are built that way. Maybe use stopped sliding dovetails in from the backs of the front legs. The ends into grooves in the lower side rails and loose in a groove on the lower back rail.

Construction or at least assembly might be easier if you make that front rail, say 3/4 in. thick and 1-1/2 in wide and then add the solid bottom behind it in a groove in the back of that rail. That way you could assemble the entire front, the entire back, and add the sides and bottom in between.
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#47
  RE: Shaker Sideboard Philip1231 Dave; OK: your ex...
(04-28-2020, 03:14 PM)Philip1231 Wrote: Dave;

OK: your explanation just made the light go on (or if you recall the old Grouchy Marx show, the duck just flew down!).

In your second paragraph, this is the approach used by Garret Hack, although he uses a spline between the front rail and the bottom panel.

Excellent: I am on the road to understanding this.

Really appreciate the help: Thanks very much!

Phil
Very good. I know about the duck, too.

I guess a spline would be a good option and if you make it in pieces with the grain running front to back it should be quite strong.

Looking forward to photos.

d
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#48
  Shaker Sideboard: Moving on to the Top Philip1231 So by next project i...
Philip, I built Garrett Hack's hunt board several years ago from his plans published by FWW. The bottom is a solid piece and, as I recall is it joined to the front and back rails with a splined glue joint. I still have the plans and I'll be glad to answer any questions you have about the design or construction. It would be very simple to eliminate the drawers and turn that section into a cabinet with doors. Here is a photo of my hunt board with the right cabinet door open that may give you some idea of the construction.


C46FF4DC-2924-4425-AC56-954CC58096A2 by Hank Knight, on Flickr
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#49
  RE: Shaker Sideboard Hank Knight Philip, I built Garr...
Hank:

Beautiful! You just became my go-to consultant on this project!

I assumed the front of the bottom would be glued to the front rail: I am not clear why he used a spline in this joint when it could have been a tongue/groove joint ? As far as the back to rear apron joint, to allow for expansion, I assumed the bottom panel just floated in the groove in the rear apron?

Seeing your version of the cabinet, I am re-thinking the all door approach. I like making drawers and I may revert back to the original design. Did you use pine for the interior parts: I was going to use cherry, but I see how your cabinet shows a very nice contrast between the cherry exterior and light colored interior: Once again, Beautiful!

I have the article from FWW on the GH Hunt Board, but honestly, its complicated, and I was thrown a little when I first looked at it. As I study it more, its starting to make sense, but the assembly sequence is somewhat intimidating.

So far I have the blanks for the legs roughed out as well as the side rails and panels.

Assistance much appreciated.

Best

Phil



(04-29-2020, 05:24 PM)Hank Knight Wrote: Philip, I built Garrett Hack's hunt board several years ago from his plans published by FWW. The bottom is a solid piece and, as I recall is it joined to the front and back rails with a splined glue joint. I still have the plans and I'll be glad to answer any questions you have about the design or construction. It would be very simple to eliminate the drawers and turn that section into a cabinet with doors. Here is a photo of my hunt board with the right cabinet door open that may give you some idea of the construction.


C46FF4DC-2924-4425-AC56-954CC58096A2 by Hank Knight, on Flickr
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#50
  Shaker Sideboard: Moving on to the Top Philip1231 So by next project i...
Hank, that is some fine work. I remember seeing Garrett’s piece when it came out and was really taken by the proportions and craftsmanship. Yours is every bit as nice.

And Phil, I know you are up to the challenge, can’t wait to see the progress!

Take care,
Kevin
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#51
  Shaker Sideboard: Moving on to the Top Philip1231 So by next project i...
PS. Hank, I saw a few other pics of your sideboard. What woods did you use? And I spy your old Inca there, I still have mine after all these years, although your Hammer is a fine machine, too.

Thanks.
Kevin
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Shaker Sideboard: Moving on to the Top


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