A new project...
#11
  Re: (...)
Well, I'm finally ready to get back into my woodshop after a summer of car restoration.

I've been thinking about building this little hanging cabinet for a long time. It is basically the hood of a tall case clock but with a divided light sash door in place of the single piece of glass.





So, I played a bit with Sketchup the other night (not my usual method but I wanted to get the unusual facade proportions as close as possible to the original). Here is my working model. What do you all think? Any interest in following along with a build of this thing? I'm aiming to have it ready to display with SAPFM at the Detroit Institute of Arts in March.









Zachary Dillinger
https://www.amazon.com/author/zdillinger

Author of "On Woodworking: Notes from a Lifetime at the Bench" and "With Saw, Plane and Chisel: Making Historic American Furniture With Hand Tools", 

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#12
  Re: A new project... by ZachDillinger (Well, I'm finally re...)
I like it!



Is it my imagination or are the window panes larger (on the 3D model) in width on the outer panels?

Because the panels on the original all seem like they are the same width
See ya around,
Dominic
------------------------------
Don't you love it when you ask someone what time it is and to prove how smart they are, they tell you how to build a watch?
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#13
  Re: A new project... by ZachDillinger (Well, I'm finally re...)
I would very much like a build-along
Thanks,  Curt
-----------------
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards."
      -- Soren Kierkegaard
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#14
  Re: A new project... by ZachDillinger (Well, I'm finally re...)
ZachDillinger said:


Any interest in following along with a build of this thing?





Yes, especially if you give us details on building the divided light sash. I want to tackle something similar with sash one of these days. I'll be tuning up my sash fillister in the mean time!!

Where did you find the original?

Jonathan


I only regret the tools I didn't buy!

“Think about it: Everything with a power cord eventually winds up in the trash.” John Sarge
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#15
  Re: Re: A new project... by Jonathan S ([blockquote]ZachDill...)
The sash will definitely be a big part of the build. The glass panes are the same width. I will have to make sure I didnt screw that up in the sketchup.

The original was taken from a dealers ad I found in Antiques and Fine Art magazine...which is highly recommended for people interested in antique eecorative arts.
Zachary Dillinger
https://www.amazon.com/author/zdillinger

Author of "On Woodworking: Notes from a Lifetime at the Bench" and "With Saw, Plane and Chisel: Making Historic American Furniture With Hand Tools", 

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#16
  Re: Re: A new project... by ZachDillinger (The sash will defini...)
Count me in as looking forward to a build along! Always like those, especially when done with only hand tools.
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#17
  Re: A new project... by ZachDillinger (Well, I'm finally re...)
That thing really has a lot of character, I can imagine a kerosene lamp reflection in the glass!

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#18
  Re: A new project... by ZachDillinger (Well, I'm finally re...)
A build along is always welcome. I'd also be curious to see more about your car restoration.
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#19
  Re: A new project... by ZachDillinger (Well, I'm finally re...)
Another vote for a build-along here.

Beauty, beholder and all that, but to my eye that hood seems a shade too tall for the rest of the piece. If I was going to do it I think I'd make it roughly in thirds - a third each for the glass panes, and a third for the hood. But I understand that you're going after the original.
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#20
  Re: Re: A new project... by PeteW (Another vote for a b...)
Pete you are right, I am not trying to improve the design, just copy the existing piece. But the funny thing is that the design is almost perfectly 1/3 rd facade and 1/3rd for each pane. The facade is 9" tall and the door is 17 1/2" tall, so dividing that in two gives you 8 3/4". I think that the upwards thrust of the goosenecks gives the facade a real verticality that makes it look taller than it is.

Should be a fun piece. I really like finding the old weird looking pieces rather than just copying all the masterpieces of the world.
Zachary Dillinger
https://www.amazon.com/author/zdillinger

Author of "On Woodworking: Notes from a Lifetime at the Bench" and "With Saw, Plane and Chisel: Making Historic American Furniture With Hand Tools", 

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