A few questions about Shellawax
#11
  Re: (...)
They have two products that intrigue me. After lots of reading and online and experimenting I have decided to use Shellac/French polish for most of my woodworking projects since it is safe and the finish usually looks really nice on most types of wood.

Shellawax products are supposed to be non-toxic and safe with shellac as their core ingredient. Although they are designed for turners I am thinking they can be excellent options for small projects like tool handles shop made tools and saw totes as they dry very quickly. I know Derek Cohen uses and likes them. They are expensive but like tru-oil, watco Danish oil, Minwax Antique oil finish are intended to be used as a quick simple finishing method (preferably for smaller projects).

My questions:
1) EEE-Ultra Shine - Here is LV's description:
Containing tripoli abrasive, EEE-Ultra Shine is a sealant and polishing compound... It is also well suited as a surface polish for film finishes (shellac, varnish, lacquer)"

Their webiste indicates that applying it over unfinished wood eliminates the need for sanding. Does that mean it can act as a "grain filler" before other finishes such as shellac even on larger projects? I understand it is not a finish. But:

2) Shellawax Cream: LV's description says" "Can be used alone or OVER EEE-Ultra Shine"

I am a bit confused if EEE-Ultra Shine should be used over Shellac and Varnish, why is it being used before Shellawax Cream?

3) If I was trying to finish an old or new saw or chisel handle that has been sanded and I wanted to use Shallawax which one of the two should I use first or would it be enough to just use the Shellawax cream and another wax on top like Carnauba or Howard Orange/beeswax?

4) Lastly what would be your reasons for not wanting to use these two products for the purpose I mentioned?

In advance thanks

Cheers
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#12
  Re: A few questions about Shellawax by Skewdge (They have two produc...)
EEE and Shellawax need heat to set them in if I remember right. I used both of them for pens and other things but when turning it I have to get it warm to get the best results.

On flatwork I am thinking you would need a buffer like the ones used for cars.

Also Shellawax has Shellac in it.

Arlin
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#13
  Re: A few questions about Shellawax by Skewdge (They have two produc...)
Skip the EEE Ultra Shine. It's really meant to just be a polishing agent. Works great on pens, but it really needs to be buffed at high speed to work it's magic. Shellac or something like Tru-Oil followed by paste wax works best on saw handles.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#14
  Re: Re: A few questions about Shellawax by AHill (Skip the EEE Ultra S...)
AHill said:


Skip the EEE Ultra Shine. It's really meant to just be a polishing agent. Works great on pens, but it really needs to be buffed at high speed to work it's magic. Shellac or something like Tru-Oil followed by paste wax works best on saw handles.




+1



The oil from your hands as well as the sweat will eventually remove or degrade the shellac. That's why I moved to using TruOil or lacquer.
See ya around,
Dominic
------------------------------
Don't you love it when you ask someone what time it is and to prove how smart they are, they tell you how to build a watch?
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#15
  Re: Re: A few questions about Shellawax by Blacky's Boy ([blockquote]AHill sa...)
Rub Shellawax cream/liquid on with a soft cloth, and them buff on a cloth wheel on a drill press or grinder. The heat from the friction sets it off and it hardens rapidly. Re-coat if you wish. I rarely use more than two coats, often one is sufficient.

The advantage of Shellawax is that it does not discolour the wood, and some woods darken with oil finishes. It leaves behind a hard, durable, waterproof finish that will resist sweat, etc.

TruOil requires several coats and takes time to dry. Shellawax is instant.

The surface of Shellawax is similar to be best hand rubbed finish. What I prize about it is the clarity it retains for the figure ...

Jarrah:




I think that this is Buloke:




Organoil, then Shellawax on She-oak ..





Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#16
  Re: Re: A few questions about Shellawax by Derek Cohen (Rub Shellawax cream/...)
Derek,

That She-oak plane is fantastic!
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#17
  Re: Re: A few questions about Shellawax by Derek Cohen (Rub Shellawax cream/...)
Derek Cohen said:


Rub Shellawax cream/liquid on with a soft cloth, and them buff on a cloth wheel on a drill press or grinder. The heat from the friction sets it off and it hardens rapidly. Re-coat if you wish. I rarely use more than two coats, often one is sufficient.

The advantage of Shellawax is that it does not discolour the wood, and some woods darken with oil finishes. It leaves behind a hard, durable, waterproof finish that will resist sweat, etc.

TruOil requires several coats and takes time to dry. Shellawax is instant.

The surface of Shellawax is similar to be best hand rubbed finish. What I prize about it is the clarity it retains for the figure ...

Jarrah:




I think that this is Buloke:




Organoil, then Shellawax on She-oak ..





Regards from Perth

Derek




Derek

I know from experience that Shellawax is not water proof. I did some utensils for my wife and it came off after several hand washings with soap and water. I also did it with a fruit bowl and water stains happened I redid both of them later.
I now use Tru Oil for other things I turn and going to use it for the High Chair I am now working on. It wears very well and lasts along time so far.

Arlin
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#18
  Re: Re: A few questions about Shellawax by Arlin Eastman ([blockquote]Derek Co...)


Derek

I know from experience that Shellawax is not water proof. I did some utensils for my wife and it came off after several hand washings with soap and water. I also did it with a fruit bowl and water stains happened I redid both of them later.


Hi Arlin

I am not suggesting that you wash your handles in a dishwasher - not that type of waterproof. However, I rinse blades when sharpening, and handles are not affected by (cold) water.

Chris Vesper also uses Shellawax on some of his handles, such as the knives and awls.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#19
  Re: A few questions about Shellawax by Skewdge (They have two produc...)
Thank you gentlemen for all your responses. I do have true-oil, antique oil, some other oil varnish mixes and pure tung oil. I have tried them all. Tru-oil is a great product. However I have beein searching for a quick finish for small projects that is non-toxic, safe and more traditional. Shellawax seems to fit the bill. The finish on Derek's tools look amazing. The wood grain is so pronounced the matt sheen is just right; without the synthetic plastic appearance of some varnishes. Thanks for posting them and for the how to info. Derek. Much obliged.
If two coats could give me a finish that good, I think the product is worth its $30+ price tag. I am definitely going to get it and hopefully post pictures of the final result.

Thanks again
Cheers
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#20
  Re: Re: A few questions about Shellawax by Skewdge (Thank you gentlemen ...)
Sorry for checking in late. Re: Non-toxicity, once cured Shellawax is fine. But it's pretty volatile on pour-out; the instructions I think do warn it could be toxic in that state.

Otherwise I agree with most of the inputs above based on my experience. A nice tool to have in your shop!

Chris
Chris
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