Show me your...
#21
  Re: Show me your... by Herb G (Drill press tables. ...)
Here is my other one.

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#22
  Re: Show me your... by Herb G (Drill press tables. ...)
I needed a way to secure a jig for holding odd shaped pieces while I drilled. This is what I came up with.

Two pieces of 3/4 MDF glued together, covered on one side with laminate and edged with maple. Rockler 3" x 36" Multi-Track for a fence and cam clamps to hold it in place.










Dave
"One should respect public opinion insofar as is necessary to avoid starvation and keep out of prison, but anything that goes beyond this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyrany, and is likely to interfere with happiness in all kinds of ways."
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#23
  Re: Show me your... by Herb G (Drill press tables. ...)
Second generation
Pat Warner
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#24
  Re: Show me your... by Herb G (Drill press tables. ...)
Other than Pat Warner's, I highly recommend that the sacrificial piece under the drill bit be round. The way I made it, the sacrificial piece cannot only be rotated to provide a fresh surface to prevent tear-out when needed, but can be flipped over to present a second fresh side. I did mine with a router and circle cutting jig.
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#25
  Re: Show me your... by Herb G (Drill press tables. ...)
Here is mine. It is a Woodpeckers DP table that they only offered for a short time and then discontinued it. A few years ago I looked to see if a guy could buy all the individual parts to build his own and they still had them. The center piece is mdf and pops out fairly easily for replacement.


Dave
"Amateur Putzing in Shop." Northern Wood on Norm 5/07

"Dave's shop is so small you have to go outside to turn around" Big Dave on my old shop
So I built a new shop.  (Picasa went away so did the link to the pictures)
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#26
  Re: Show me your... by Herb G (Drill press tables. ...)
I bought this drill press table and fence on a close-out from Rockler a while back. I don’t think it’s offered any longer, but it has features both good and bad worth considering in a new design. It is made of MDF about 1-1/8” thick with laminate on both sides. The surface is a spacious 29” x 21”.



I modified the Rockler design it in a few ways: 1. added the outer pair of T-tracks; 2. modified the fence to operate as a pivot from one end; 3. beefed up the attachment to the original iron table on the press; 4; substituted threaded inserts for Rockler’s tiny sheet metal screws in a few places (after some sheet metal screws tore out).

Some thoughts:

Attachment: I thought the original attachment relying on friction with Rockler’s aluminum hold-down fingers was inadequate - an accident waiting to land on my toes. I think it’s important for the add-on table to be attached positively to the iron table of the press, especially if the iron table can be tilted. I used scrap pieces of oak baluster to make a little U-shaped frame around 3 sides of the iron table, then captured the spindle under the iron table with two more pieces, as pictured. MIght be overkill, but it won’t fall off.



Material Thickness: I thought 1-1/8” MDF would be rigid enough. It is for most purposes. However, if I tighten the attachment down too hard, the surface will crown by a few mils, not much, but enough to annoy. I have to be careful to snug the knobs tight, but not too tight. If I were making a new one, I would consider something more rigid for the top, e.g., laminating two Baltic birch sheets.

Fence: I like the simplicity of the pivot fence. At first, it seems goofy with the work at an odd angle, but you get used to it, and the one-hand operation is really nice. When I need it, I can set the fence up to translate fore-and-aft on the T-track, but I find that cumbersome and imprecise without also installing some sort of screw adjustment.

I see that Rockler now offers a drill press fence from Biesemeyer; that might be be worth checking out. However, the simple pivot meets most of my needs very well. The aluminum extrusion with MDF faces and T-slots included as OEM with the table from Rockler works fine with the addition of pivot point at one end and a lengthened slot at the other. I don’t find the OEM chip collection hood to be useful at all.
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#27
  Re: Re: Show me your... by Paul-in-Plymouth (I bought this drill ...)
Sorry. Somehow my photos don't show. I pasted the address into the screen that comes up from pressing "Image." I thought that's what had worked before, but I don't do this often enough to remember for sure. I tried several variations before I posted it, but no luck. Stumped.

I'd appreciate it if someone would show me the error of my ways.
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#28
  Re: Re: Show me your... by Paul-in-Plymouth (I bought this drill ...)
Paul-in-Plymouth said:


I bought this drill press table and fence on a close-out from Rockler a while back. I don’t think it’s offered any longer, but it has features both good and bad worth considering in a new design. It is made of MDF about 1-1/8” thick with laminate on both sides. The surface is a spacious 29” x 21”.
]http://s1379.photobucket.com/user/paul-i...mp;o=72[/image]

I modified the Rockler design it in a few ways: 1. added the outer pair of T-tracks; 2. modified the fence to operate as a pivot from one end; 3. beefed up the attachment to the original iron table on the press; 4; substituted threaded inserts for Rockler’s tiny sheet metal screws in a few places (after some sheet metal screws tore out).

Some thoughts:

Attachment: I thought the original attachment relying on friction with Rockler’s aluminum hold-down fingers was inadequate - an accident waiting to land on my toes. I think it’s important for the add-on table to be attached positively to the iron table of the press, especially if the iron table can be tilted. I used scrap pieces of oak baluster to make a little U-shaped frame around 3 sides of the iron table, then captured the spindle under the iron table with two more pieces, as pictured. MIght be overkill, but it won’t fall off.
]http://s1379.photobucket.com/user/paul-i...mp;o=73[/image]

Material Thickness: I thought 1-1/8” MDF would be rigid enough. It is for most purposes. However, if I tighten the attachment down too hard, the surface will crown by a few mils, not much, but enough to annoy. I have to be careful to snug the knobs tight, but not too tight. If I were making a new one, I would consider something more rigid for the top, e.g., laminating two Baltic birch sheets.

Fence: I like the simplicity of the pivot fence. At first, it seems goofy with the work at an odd angle, but you get used to it, and the one-hand operation is really nice. When I need it, I can set the fence up to translate fore-and-aft on the T-track, but I find that cumbersome and imprecise without also installing some sort of screw adjustment.

I see that Rockler now offers a drill press fence from Biesemeyer; that might be be worth checking out. However, the simple pivot meets most of my needs very well. The aluminum extrusion with MDF faces and T-slots included as OEM with the table from Rockler works fine with the addition of pivot point at one end and a lengthened slot at the other. I don’t find the OEM chip collection hood to be useful at all.




fify

ch
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#29
  Re: Re: Show me your... by Paul-in-Plymouth (I bought this drill ...)



On your photobucket page, left click on the rectangle next to IMG below the Share This Photo. It should flash briefly and tell you copied.

On WN, paste that stuff into the Post editor. (just paste it in).

If you do a quote on this article, you should be able to see what it should look like.

Oh, yeah, almost forgot: nice job on the table.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
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#30
  Re: Show me your... by Herb G (Drill press tables. ...)
Here is the one I made:







George

if it ain't broke, you're not tryin'
Quando omni flunkus, moritati.
Red Green

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