Stationary belt sander vs disc sander?
#11
  Re: (...)
In general what are the strengths and weaknesses of stationary belt sanders vs stationary disk sanders?

I have been making boxes with dovetail keys. I am using chisels to flushtrim the keys, but am thinking I want a power method. Which do you think is better for this? Who makes a good tabletop version?
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#12
  Re: Stationary belt sander vs disc sander? by jgourlay (In general what are ...)
Belt would be easier to sand just the corners
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#13
  Re: Stationary belt sander vs disc sander? by jgourlay (In general what are ...)
In my experience, the belt is better for almost every operation.
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#14
  Re: Stationary belt sander vs disc sander? by jgourlay (In general what are ...)
"Flush trimming With a Router" -- Plan to build a flush trim router base for splines and keys:

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/359513982728137009

I made something similar for my laminate trimmer. Cut keys/splines close, then sand flush.
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#15
  Re: Stationary belt sander vs disc sander? by jgourlay (In general what are ...)
http://www.grizzly.com/products/6-x-80-B...nder/G1531
It's called an edge sander. Don't waste your time with a disc sander. You can do more with an edge sander. Plus it sands linear. A disc sander will sand curved lines which will more sanding.
The router that was linked would be a good start.
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#16
  Re: Stationary belt sander vs disc sander? by jgourlay (In general what are ...)
for trimming keys, plugs, dowels, etc. I use a flush trim saw. Use a playing card or something if needed to keep it from scratching parts you don't want scratched. Then sand as normal
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#17
  Re: Re: Stationary belt sander vs disc sander? by Firebee (for trimming keys, p...)
For sanding sides of small boxes, I like the 12" disc sander. Especially if the whole side of the box fits on the disc.
I have a 12" disc sander as well as a stationary belt sander.
The belt sander is a Ridgid oss as well as belt.
I think the 12" disc gives a flatter surface.
The oss/belt sander, belts last a long time because of the oscillating feature.
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#18
  Re: Re: Edge sander... by Rick L ([url=http://www.griz...)
Thanks for that
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#19
  Re: Stationary belt sander vs disc sander? by jgourlay (In general what are ...)
We got one of these at work. I didn't expect much but when I used it I was pleasantly surprised. Plenty of power and the fit and finish were better than Harbor Freight. For the price and added dust collection port I am ready to upgrade my old one for this sturdier model.


Home Depot
Also available through Sears.

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#20
  Re: Stationary belt sander vs disc sander? by jgourlay (In general what are ...)
I have a Shopsmith 6" belt sander on a power stand that I use a lot in the shop. It has a good, solid platen and work platform that is decent sized and absolutely holds its position once set. I use it to clean up the ends of spindle turning, squaring pen blanks to the end of the brass, breaking the edge of projects, and other things that escape me at the moment. It would be great for cleaning up finger joints if I did them. Belts last a long time as long as I keep de-clogging them with the cleaning sick (looks like an old art gum eraser).

I have used 14" and 16" disk sanders that did a good job on small work, but the swirl marks got nasty on larger work. Also, the faster sanding on the outer part versus the inner radius area was problematic.

I have the Shopsmith 12" disk and the 12" conical disk sanders, but do not recall ever even mounting either one when I had the 6" belt available.
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