Sharpening without water
#21
  Re: Re: Sharpening without water by Anji12305 (Simple Green, Windex...)
Anji12305 said:


Simple Green, Windex or similar mild detergent in spray bottles work well on Diamond plates.

I switched to oil stones with WD40 about two years ago.
Just throw away the old rags properly when they're filthy.

No rust on my tools, this way.

A single gallon container of WD40 should help you sharpen for a lifetime. I use a smaller trigger style spray bottle.





Uhhh, why would you be using a polymerizing oil with oilstones?

edit to add: Yes, I know WD40 isn't a polymerizing oil. It's barely an oil...

Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
Reply
#22
  Re: Sharpening without water by frigator (Well, its been many ...)
You can add me to the list of folks who use waterstones without running water. I use a set of Shapton Pros. For water, I use a spray bottle, and a tray to collect the runoff.

I’d really love to have running water, but that’s not feasible in my workshop. There was a recent article in Pop Wood by William Ng that showed a waterstone tray setup that used an aquarium pump to provide “running” water. The pump pumped water from a reservoir on the floor (you can use a 5 gallon bucket) up to the waterstone tray, and a drain led back to the bucket. I keep meaning to try this out.
Hail St. Roy, Full of Grace, The Schwarz is with thee.
Blessed art thou among woodworkers, and blessed is the fruit of thy saw, dovetails.
Holy St. Roy, Master of Chisels, pray for us sharpeners now, and at the hour of planing.
Amen.
$300 is a lot of Money!
giant Cypress: Japanese tool blog
Reply
#23
  Re: Sharpening without water by frigator (Well, its been many ...)
Add me to the list of no running water.  

Just a spray bottle and a rag for my shapton and diamond stones.  

I do have a waterstone I keep in a tote and just change out the water every now and then.  Will replace the water stone with a diamond or shapton when it's time is up.
Reply
#24
  Re: Sharpening without water by frigator (Well, its been many ...)
I use the water from my dehumidifier, that is located right next to my workbench.
Train to be miserable...
that way when the real misery starts you won't notice.
Reply
#25
  Re: RE: Sharpening without water by jppierson (I use the water from...)
I use glass cleaner on my diamond stones.
Everything is a prototype so its a one of a kind.
Reply
#26
  Re: Sharpening without water by frigator (Well, its been many ...)
Be careful of using water stones in a sink, particularly a kitchen sink.  Two bad things can happen:  The stone swarf can reharden in the piping.  It also can get into your garbage disposer cutters, which can leave you with either the sharpest, or the dullest, disposer grinder blades ever.   Thorough rinsing probably minimizes the risk.
Reply
#27
  Re: RE: Sharpening without water by Mike Brady (Be careful of using ...)
I hadnt thought about the pipes. I still dont have water but plan to tap into the line in the wall that feeds the adjoining spare bedroom. Since my sink will be lower than the drain pipe in that bathroom I will just run a pvc pipe through the outside wall and drain into the yard..violating some code no doubt. Our house has those new plastic water lines...blue and red. I called a plumber to get a quote and he charged 900$ to put the sink in, sink included. I said thank you but I will have to figure it out myself or have no sink.
Reply
#28
  Re: Sharpening without water by frigator (Well, its been many ...)
I tried using WD-40 as sharpening oil, a machinist instructor had recommended it. I found mineral oil worked much better.
A man of foolish pursuits
Reply
#29
  Re: RE: Sharpening without water by Mike Brady (Be careful of using ...)
(08-08-2016, 10:18 AM)Mike Brady Wrote: Be careful of using water stones in a sink, particularly a kitchen sink.  Two bad things can happen:  The stone swarf can reharden in the piping.  It also can get into your garbage disposer cutters, which can leave you with either the sharpest, or the dullest, disposer grinder blades ever.   Thorough rinsing probably minimizes the risk.

Have you seen evidence of waterstone debris damaging pipes or garbage disposal parts?  I've never heard of this problem.  Nor have I experienced it.

I'm not sure how "stone swarf" can reharden in the piping.  You've already dissolved the binder.  Without a binder, the stone particles remain just that - stone particles - with a particle size on the order of flour.  (The median size of flour particles are between 20-60 microns, depending on the type of flour.  A 1000 grit waterstone is around 15 microns particle size).  I just run the water awhile after flushing my stones in the sink.  The swarf gets carried down the drain, just like anything else.  Unless the particles get into the motor bearings, I don't think we have much to worry about flushing waterstones in the kitchen sink.  My personal opinion.  I'm open to evidence to the contrary.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
Reply
#30
  Re: RE: Sharpening without water by AHill ([quote='Mike Brady' ...)
I need to check my basement drains, which are either plastic or (downstream) cast iron.  I am relating this from George Wilson, who was a tool maker at Williamsburg, and coincidentally the most skilled wood and metal artisan of my personal experience.   He warns against carelessly rinsing stone slurry from sharpening at a sink. 

This poster should have no problem since his sink is apparently going to empty directly to the outside.  Uhoh  My floor drain in the garage does that (don't tell the building inspector).
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)