Sharpening stone question
#19
  Re: Sharpening stone question by mr_skittle (I got this stone at ...)
(04-20-2017, 05:28 AM)Tony Z Wrote: Brand new Norton India stones are cheap.  If you want this type of stone, look at a two sided medium/fine.  Nortons come oil impregnated, but I would buy a bottle of the Norton oil to go with the purchase.

When Norton introduced the medium, it was said to be the equal of their washita.  In my book, vintage stones are readily available at any flea market, dirt cheap.  Clean this stone up (artificial stones such as this, stay flat a long time) and begin to use it.  See how it feels and then decide what your next step will be.  If you shop flea markets, run your fingernail on this stone, and when you come across a used one, subjectively test it the same way.  Pretty soon, you'll come across some finer stones.  Soon you'll be asking how to clean them.  Soon you'll be asking what a washita looks like, or a fine Arkansas and so forth.

To add:
Cleaned up, that stone will make a fine alternative to a grinder unless something is severely damaged and needs 1/4" of metal removed.  It should be able to produce a serviceable edge, but you can do better.

A 2x8 doubled sided (coarse/fine) Norton India stone is routinely around $21 on Amazon.  A good investment and a "cheap" way to dabble in oilstones.  Man-made of course and still a bit on the coarse side!  But works wonderfully.  You can go right to a strop after the fine side (a power strop is fantastic) or save a few swipes at the strop and pick up a nice hard Arkansas (black, surgical black, etc) too.  These are relatively easy to come by second-hand and certainly easy to buy new.

Learning to sharpen free-hand removes the need to always have 3" wide, 8" long stones to support the jig.  You can do a lot with just a 2x6 stone.

And don't bother buying fancy honing oils.  All kinds of "cheap" alternatives.  If you keep the stone wiped down and don't let it get gummy, mineral oil is fine.  I found a big bottle of baby oil (basically the same thing) at the $1 store that is nearly water thin.  I add to that a splash of kerosene (big jug will last a lifetime if just used for sharpening) and I have what seems to be a very good oil that floats the swarf and if I'm lazy and forget to wipe down the stone, isn't gummy the next day.  Down side is that is smells like somebody abandoned a baby in a truck-stop.

Finally, making oil-stone boxes is a good way to use up small scraps of wood and practice various carving techniques, etc.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
Reply
#20
  Re: Sharpening stone question by mr_skittle (I got this stone at ...)
When looking at flea market stones, look at me he box, more than the stone. A box, handmade, with hand planes chamfers, etc., generally indicates a stone that th craftsman was proud of, or valued for its cost. Don't look for a pristine box, but just how it's made. Then do the finger nail test. I've got many dozens of stones in my accumulations, mostly for a few bucks. Have a fine translucent hard Arkansas that cost next to nothing, but it is as fine a natural stone as you will find, and is my favorite. You'll also find natural sizes are odd and not uniform in size.

For honing oil, my favorite is Marvel Mystery Oil. Quart will set you back about three bucks at Walmart.

Also, for those intent on flattening natural stones-USE A PROPER DUST MASK, if using a powered sander/grinder.
Waiting to grow up beyond being just a member
http://www.metaltech-pm.com
Reply
#21
  Re: Sharpening stone question by mr_skittle (I got this stone at ...)
(04-20-2017, 10:32 AM)Rob Young Wrote: I found a big bottle of baby oil ... I add to that a splash of kerosene (big jug will last a lifetime if just used for sharpening) and I have what seems to be a very good oil ...

Down side is that is smells like somebody abandoned a baby in a truck-stop.

Good one!
Reply
#22
  Re: Sharpening stone question by mr_skittle (I got this stone at ...)
The best most comprehensive treatment on sharpening media that I've seen is Ron Hock's book The Perfect Edge. I liked it because of the technical background and the why something works. As opposed to the "just use this this and this" advice.   You seem to not be afraid of the why. That said diamond seems to be changing the game from stones like you have. Waterstones next then oil stones are least efficient. 

I'm curious why your oil stone is dishing while flattening. The only thing I can think of  is a slurry is building up in the middle while flattening and not getting cleared away fast enough. Maybe use more oil or water in the slurry. That old binder in your stone is a question mark too. Let me know what works for you. My dad had a bunch of oilstones that he used for knife sharpeing. They are  too deeply dished for flattening any planes or chisels. I haven't bought a diamond flattening plate. That is my next step.
Reply
#23
  Re: Sharpening stone question by mr_skittle (I got this stone at ...)
(05-07-2017, 12:08 PM)smithgl12 Wrote: The best most comprehensive treatment on sharpening media that I've seen is Ron Hock's book The Perfect Edge. I liked it because of the technical background and the why something works. As opposed to the "just use this this and this" advice.   You seem to not be afraid of the why. That said diamond seems to be changing the game from stones like you have. Waterstones next then oil stones are least efficient. 

I'm curious why your oil stone is dishing while flattening. The only thing I can think of  is a slurry is building up in the middle while flattening and not getting cleared away fast enough. Maybe use more oil or water in the slurry. That old binder in your stone is a question mark too. Let me know what works for you. My dad had a bunch of oilstones that he used for knife sharpeing. They are  too deeply dished for flattening any planes or chisels. I haven't bought a diamond flattening plate. That is my next step.
....................
Many, if not most old stones found in the wild are hollowed badly because they were used so often..Many times when I want to restore them, I hold them flat on the platen of a stationary belt sander/grinder with a sharp silicon carbide belt..A couple of minutes on that machine can breathe new life into a worn out hone.
"By God, we are First Marines, and all the communist bastards in the world cannot stop us from going where we intend to go"
Col. Chesty Puller USMC  At the  Chosin Reservoir North Korea 1950, "The Forgotten War"


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea 51/52





Reply
#24
  Re: Sharpening stone question by mr_skittle (I got this stone at ...)
OK thanks TW. I only have the Ridgid. OSS/belt sander. So I'd have to hold them kinda side ways but good idea. I'll try that. If that proves too awkward I may try the handheld belt sander.

(Wasn't trying to hijack the OP post, just saying I'm in the same boat. )
Reply
#25
  Re: Sharpening stone question by mr_skittle (I got this stone at ...)
Make sure you use a GOOD dust mask, whatever powered method you use. Us "more seasoned (a bit older)" guys sometimes wish we had paid more attention to safety protection decades ago. For me, it is hearing.
Waiting to grow up beyond being just a member
http://www.metaltech-pm.com
Reply
#26
  Re: Sharpening stone question by mr_skittle (I got this stone at ...)
Aluminum oxide stones are very good for their intended purpose. Everyone should have one in their shop. Use one all the time for sharpening my pocket knife.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)