What types of chisels are you using
#21
  Re: What types of chisels are you using by Smoothjazz077 (I have been working ...)
(05-30-2017, 09:47 PM)Aram Wrote: Lots of good ones out there. I started with Matsumura blue steel chisels. They kept a very keen edge, but maybe because I use hard woods, they chipped. All the time. I wasn't even that hard on them.

That's strange. I've had my Matsumuras for well over ten years and I've cut a lot of dovetails with them during that time, in all kinds of woods. I've never had a chip. I had some cheaper Japanese chisels before my Matsumuras that chipped, but the Matsumuras never have.
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#22
  Re: What types of chisels are you using by Smoothjazz077 (I have been working ...)
Narex bench and mortise chisels.
George

if it ain't broke, you're not tryin'
Quando omni flunkus, moritati.
Red Green

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#23
  Re: What types of chisels are you using by Smoothjazz077 (I have been working ...)
Scott, what matters in a chisel for DT's is the side bevel height (SBH).  In order not the bruise the corners when chopping out the tail waste, it is critical for the chisel to have a low SBH.  Another big factor is overall balance in your hand.  Personally I have quite large hands so prefer a heavier chisel with a thicker handle which may be just the opposite of another's pref.  

Of course any chisel can work for DT's by adapting ones attack on the corners.  For years I did quite acceptable DT's using Irwin Marple blue handled chisels (extremely high SBH).  Two brands I know of with the lowest SBH's are 1) Lie Nielsen, and 2)Ashley Iles (AL also has a line of oval chisels with no bevel at all). 

Fine Woodworking Magazine has a very excellent chisel review I strongly recommend you take a look.

Personally, I use Narex.  Be sure to get the "premium" set as they have a lower SBH.

I also have experience with Stanley 750.  Pretty disappointed overall - handle too small, chisel too light, edge retention poor, SBH quite high - as high as the cheap Irwin Marple chisels (which are actually not bad chisels, but not for DT's.)

I think its a good idea to have one set of chisels for fine joinery work and another heavier for mortising, etc.

Hope this helps
Everything is a prototype so its a one of a kind.
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#24
  Re: What types of chisels are you using by Smoothjazz077 (I have been working ...)
I was visiting a fellow woodworker last night, and he has been using the AI Butt chisels for about 2yrs, and just loves them.  Likes that they're shorter than a standard bench chisel, which he says allows him to have better control of the chisel when chopping and paring.  They felt very comfortable in my hand, and I can see what he means by the shorter chisel having more control.  It's funny, because there are some many options out there, and like everything else, it just comes down to personal preference.  I don't anticipate making any changes to my current set up at this time.  As mentioned in my original post, I have 1 Vertias PM-V11 chisel, and 3 Sandvik chisels, which seem to be working okay for me at this point.  I'm going to hold off purchasing anything of significant value just yet, and probably will not need to purchase anything in the range of PM-V11 I own.  I am amazed how many different combinations people use, from Japanese chisels to LN to ALDI.  That one really caught me by surprise.  I have an ALDI store near me, and would've never thought of looking for bench chisels.  

Scott
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#25
  Re: What types of chisels are you using by Smoothjazz077 (I have been working ...)
As mentioned, chisels with minimal lands are important to get into the sidewall of pins, but this is only essential for narrow pins. It is possible to use a thick-sided chisel on a skew, but only if there is room to manoevre.

I can mention three chisels that I consider superior for dovetails. All have narrow lands:

1. Veritas PM-V11 - the handles are comfortable, the steel is excellent for impact, and they are a well balanced chisel.

2. Koyamaichi dovetail chisels: these Japanese chisels have the best edge holding of all. They are used with a gennou for control. Exceptional chisels in hardwood.

3. Blue Spruce dovetail chisels: while their A2 blades do not hold up to impact as well as the others here, they hold up well enough for most, and then they make up for this with exceptional balance and comfort. The blades are shorter annd lighter than the others, which translates into increased feedback.

You cannot go wrong with any of the above.

Don't forget to purchase a fishtail chisel for half blind socket corners. I really like the Blue Spruce ones.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#26
  Re: What types of chisels are you using by Smoothjazz077 (I have been working ...)
Aldis usually brings those chisels out the Wednesday before Fathers' Day.    They usually sell out the same day......their new weekly ads change on Wednesdays, as well


Smallest of the 4 is an 8mm.  

Paul Sellers seems to love them....

I didn't even know one of them had cut my finger...until  I saw "Fresh DNA" on the wood I was working on.......didn't even leave a scar.   

Most of my other chisels are older than I am.   At least with the go-to users on the bench. 

YMMV
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
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#27
  Re: What types of chisels are you using by Smoothjazz077 (I have been working ...)
When cutting dovetails I like using E.A. Bergs, Swedish chisels, they are very thin, good for getting into tight places. Stanley and Buck brothers made a knock off of them in the 50's.

Slav
"More the Knowledge Lesser the Ego, Lesser the Knowledge More the Ego..." -Albert Einstein.
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#28
  Re: What types of chisels are you using by Smoothjazz077 (I have been working ...)
Overall my favorite chisels are a set of Greenlees that the old timers call "Classic Thin" they are light and hold an edge, and of course they are thin....my set goes for 1/4 up to 2" and it took me a year or so to complete the set...
   


However Here is an example of the best dovetail chisels in the world!  From Rob Cosman and it's an IBC...
   


IBC chisels hold their edge, and the removable handles are great for sharpening or to add longer or shorter handles without buying a new chisel.   
   

For value, I really like the Narex Butt chisels and mortise chisels, a little work and they are fine workers, both sets are less than one high end chisel.
   


Regards,
Andy


-- mos maiorum
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#29
  Re: What types of chisels are you using by Smoothjazz077 (I have been working ...)
I use vintage stanley 750 chisels. Not the best but I have less than 30 dollars in them. They are 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, 1, and 1 1/2.
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#30
  Re: What types of chisels are you using by Smoothjazz077 (I have been working ...)
Derek, yes, and I would add the LN fishtail.  It is a single bevel.

Actually I've found I don't use it as much on 1/2 blinds anymore a 1/8" chisel works just as good.

I'm also interested in the non-bevelled, oval Ashley Iles versions.  May get one just to try.

The Cosman DT chisel is also interesting.  Might try making one from an old chisel.
Everything is a prototype so its a one of a kind.
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