Almost forgotten fore plane?
#9
  
Just got the August Pop Wood, and chuckled over the Schwarz' article on the "Almost Forgotten Fore Plane."  Almost forgotten by whom?  Every time the subject comes up here, quite a few people (including me) weigh in on their appreciation of this size/function of tool.
Reply
#10
  Re: Almost forgotten fore plane? by Bill_Houghton (Just got the August ...)
I got mine today and just finished the article. I had the same impression. But a #5 is still a Jack to me, a fore is a #6, but I wouldn't put such a heavy radius on a #6, that's what scrubs are for. 

That being said, I do have an extra #5 set up exactly as he described which I used as a scrub for 10 years before I bought a scrub. 

I also tire of the quoting of, here at least, Moxon, and his penchant for quoting that odd French guy all the time, but appreciated the Mark Twain quote, as it referred to the Jack plane.
Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
No Evaporust was used on these tools.
Reply
#11
  Re: Almost forgotten fore plane? by Bill_Houghton (Just got the August ...)
He uses reverse psychology. Probably just listed 200 of them on E-bay......
Worst thing they can do is cook ya and eat ya

GW
Reply
#12
  Re: Almost forgotten fore plane? by Bill_Houghton (Just got the August ...)
I don't know that they're "forgotten".  He says his favorite foreplane is a No. 5, and those are wildly popular.  It's just that he puts a radius on his iron and uses it as a roughing tool.  Quite a different application than most No. 5's probably see in service.  In fact, his article is consistent with his book, "Handplane Essentials", where "foreplane" is really a function, and not a specific model number of a plane.  I think part of the confusion is that Stanley marketed their No. 6 as a foreplane, so when we hear the word "foreplane", a No. 6 comes to mind.  I would agree that the No. 6 is not very commonly found in most hand tool users' arsenals.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
Reply
#13
  Re: Almost forgotten fore plane? by Bill_Houghton (Just got the August ...)
I've always had and used a #6 as sorta a fore plane, probably because of my grandfather, his bench type planes were:
# 3
# 4 1/2
# 5 1/2
# 6
# 8

He was a sawmill guy and used a draw knife much like I use a scrub plane, and then it was his #6....Wish I had spent enough time with him to learn how to use the tools that were second nature to him...

Was just using mine today on some maple and cherry, not forgotten at all....

Andy


-- mos maiorum
Reply
#14
  Re: Almost forgotten fore plane? by Bill_Houghton (Just got the August ...)
I prefer a 5 1/2. I have two actually. A LV bevel up jack that I use as a smoother and a flat side 605 1/2 that Tablesaw tom resurfaced that I use as a fore plane.
Reply
#15
  Re: Almost forgotten fore plane? by Bill_Houghton (Just got the August ...)
The title is to catch people's attention. It is a technique commonly used in publications (either by the author or by the editor).

I suppose it worked well, judging by the discussion people have had here!

Simon
Reply
#16
  Re: Almost forgotten fore plane? by Bill_Houghton (Just got the August ...)
I had a short visit with my in- laws last week.
Oh, the Tea and bikkies were smashing, eh, what?
So, we chatted and  pixx drunk father in law started in.  Loud.    
But, I took leave, and drat,   almost ..forgot ... my foreplane.
Left it just next to my Teacup.  Fancy that.   

buggerall, it happens all the time.

  (anon) (apologies to Brits, Aussies, etc)
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)