small spokeshaves
#9
  
I would like to try my hand at some smaller projects and was looking at two spokeshaves, the LV cast round (here) and the LN small bronze shave (here).
If you have any experience with either, I'd appreciate feedback. Thanks!
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#10
  Re: small spokeshaves by Youngbuck (I would like to try ...)
I can't help you with the LN that you've indicated; but I can tell you that the Boggs (which I have, use, and love) is strictly for fine finishing. If  I need to shape, I use other shaves first. Wish you the best.
Gotta learn it sometime, so take your time, enjoy, and make sawdust...
Archie
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#11
  Re: small spokeshaves by Youngbuck (I would like to try ...)
I've used the LV one for tight curves and it works well, but because the radius is quite tight it's pretty hard to control unless the curve is only slightly larger in radius than the tool.  If you've used both a full size flat and a full size radius shave you'll know what I'm talking about.
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#12
  Re: small spokeshaves by Youngbuck (I would like to try ...)
I agree with the finicky aspect of the curved bottom shaves. Though it's necessary to have one for the finish, I use my flat bottom shaves to do all the prep. The #1 Millers Falls "cigar" shave is the tightest curves I've managed. But then, I get incredible results from my low angle wood shaves. Have you considered the old woodies? The Stanley 63/64 are both smaller and make fairly consistent cuts in a tight radius. For my other metal Stanley's, I've started using the LV replacement blades. These thicker blades have really lessened the chatter.
Gotta learn it sometime, so take your time, enjoy, and make sawdust...
Archie
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#13
  Re: small spokeshaves by Youngbuck (I would like to try ...)
Thanks for the replies folks. To be honest, I've never used a spokeshave. I'm looking at making some spoons and was going to use one for shaping. On LN's website, they have a flat sole option for the small shave, don't know if that would be any better. I can't use any power tools.
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#14
  Re: small spokeshaves by Youngbuck (I would like to try ...)
I think you might be well served to get an old flat soled Stanley like a 151 and play with that first, it would be a steep slope to learn on a very tight radius shave.  It will also be useful for roughing than the LN/LV ones as mentioned above, because the new ones have tight mouths and won't pass a thick shaving without filing them open.  

One more thing, you'll also have to figure out how to hold the spoon while you're shaving it.  That's the nice thing about knives, they are one handed so you have the other hand to hold the spoon.
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#15
  Re: small spokeshaves by Youngbuck (I would like to try ...)
At least one carving chisel (curved) plus just plain chisels might be a better solution for shaping the spoon. I have one each (convex; concave) spoke shave that will do what you want. Mine are Clifton shaves. 

Flat bottom shaves (like the Stanley 51; 53; 151) are superb for shaping and finishing spoke-like projects. I can ease edges, etc., as well. Rounded bottom shaves are much handier for curves and tight areas; but they are (IME) much more finicky since you can more easily roll them (gouge deeper or come out shallow). Now, when I get the technique right, the round bottoms perform well. Convex and Concave shaves still give me problems, since I struggle to keep the flow straight and steady. It's just too easy to lean or skew a cut and then have it go bad. Some days I just want to put the concave shave on the anvil and hammer out that blasted "smile." Smile
Gotta learn it sometime, so take your time, enjoy, and make sawdust...
Archie
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#16
  Re: small spokeshaves by Youngbuck (I would like to try ...)
Late to the party, but I may as well weigh in.  If I had only one spokeshave for making spoons, it would be the Veritas low-angle spokeshave.  It's especially good with end-grain, which you will cut a lot of when making spoons.  

I've written up my thoughts and tips on various spokeshaves here on my blog.
Steve S.
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