Laying in some Pen Turning Stock, hand-tool focus
#11
  
I wanted to get ready for about a half-dozen pens coming up.   I use all sorts of odd stocks, so preparing a few at a time helps save a little time.

I realized I could use a Spokeshave to prepare better for the lathe, save on dust, etc....   Rough rounding is facilitated by putting the blank in its bushings inside the vise soft jaws:
   

Here I've laid in a few packages for later:
   

Here is one of the walnut ones; I couldn't wait any longer!   The finish is Doctor's Woodshop Pens Plus.   I'm not a French-polisher, but I think there are elements of the same action there.... shellac is friction-set, and walnut oil serves as a lubricant during application.
   


Happy woodworking!

Chris
Chris
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#12
  Re: Laying in some Pen Turning Stock, hand-tool focus by C. in Indy (I wanted to get read...)
Good looking pen Chris

Did you do the whole thing by hand without a lathe?
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#13
  Re: Laying in some Pen Turning Stock, hand-tool focus by C. in Indy (I wanted to get read...)
(07-23-2017, 02:30 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: Good looking pen Chris

Did you do the whole thing by hand without a lathe?

From what he said, no.  Though I have to wonder why he bothers rounding anywhere but on the lathe.  Simple, short, safe, and no dust until you sand.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#14
  Re: Laying in some Pen Turning Stock, hand-tool focus by C. in Indy (I wanted to get read...)
Howdy,
    I do use a lathe; my spokeshave skills are still developing Smile

    The main reason I like pre-chamfering or pre-rounding is to reduce impacts at the pen-mandrel on the lathe.   It seems like mandrel is always on the cusp of either too loose or overtorqued due to wind-up.   The less major corners on the wood pieces, the easier I can manage the setup and keep things true.   Somewhat fewer risky situations at the bandsaw are a good thing, too.
Chris
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#15
  Re: Laying in some Pen Turning Stock, hand-tool focus by C. in Indy (I wanted to get read...)
Here are some excellent faceted wood pencils I found to admire on the Instagram feeds (not my work)!

https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/u...ils/?hl=en


Faceted tool handles are very interesting to me; I wonder why we don't see more of them.


Happy New Year,
Chris
Chris
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#16
  Re: RE: Laying in some Pen Turning Stock, hand-tool focus by C. in Indy (Here are some excell...)
(01-01-2019, 08:45 PM)C. in Indy Wrote: Here are some excellent faceted wood pencils I found to admire on the Instagram feeds (not my work)!

https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/u...ils/?hl=en


Faceted tool handles are very interesting to me; I wonder why we don't see more of them.


Happy New Year,
Chris

The grip on my Parker 75 fountain pen is triangular.  It makes a significant difference.
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#17
  Re: Laying in some Pen Turning Stock, hand-tool focus by C. in Indy (I wanted to get read...)
OP......
I see you have some apricot blanks  Cool
Apricot is among the most beautiful wood I have used for pens  Yes
Greg

It's better to burn out than it is to rust

Danchris Nursery
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#18
  Re: RE: Laying in some Pen Turning Stock, hand-tool focus by C. in Indy (Here are some excell...)
(01-01-2019, 08:45 PM)C. in Indy Wrote: Here are some excellent faceted wood pencils I found to admire on the Instagram feeds (not my work)!

https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/u...ils/?hl=en


Faceted tool handles are very interesting to me; I wonder why we don't see more of them.


Happy New Year,
Chris

Cool  Some of those are pretty neat
Steve


Putzing, the new hobby

Evil lurks here, but eventually gets cleansed.


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#19
  Re: Laying in some Pen Turning Stock, hand-tool focus by C. in Indy (I wanted to get read...)
I went to the link and I really liked how most of those pens turned out.  Looking forward to seeing yours. Yes
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#20
  Re: Laying in some Pen Turning Stock, hand-tool focus by C. in Indy (I wanted to get read...)
Inspired by those Instagram posts above, I got around to a proof-of-concept on an Octagonal pen.   This was based on the Penn State Civil War style kit.

The (no-name acacia) blank was drilled and roughed to a tapered octagonal prism shape with the bushings, vise, and plane:

   


Further refinement to equalize the 8 faces was done on the same plane, inverted so that the wood-blank could scoot across, jointer-style, interatively:

   


I used the lathe for a minor bit of end-coving, then applied some molten waxes with a small iron (beeswax and shellac waxes).  I then used a small blank of almond hardwood to scrape off the excess wax and do more burnishing, following by cloth buffing:

   


The finished pen is now ready for trials!  The shape is not uncomfortable, but not super; I might wish to further break the edges next time.  The hard wax finish does feel nice, though, which helps.

   


Happy woodworking!
Chris
Chris
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