Extension cord repair
#11
  
Nicked a cord. Curious what others do...

1) trash
2) cut it and put new end(s) on
3) open up/splice to keep it full length (minus an inch or two...). If so, what is your preferred splicing method and materials.
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#12
  Re: Extension cord repair by JosephP (Nicked a cord. Curi...)
male and female plugs
Mark

I'm no expert, unlike everybody else here - Busdrver


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#13
  Re: Extension cord repair by JosephP (Nicked a cord. Curi...)
(08-02-2017, 11:55 AM)JosephP Wrote: Nicked a cord.  Curious what others do...

1) trash
2) cut it and put new end(s) on
3) open up/splice to keep it full length (minus an inch or two...).  If so, what is your preferred splicing method and materials.

#2  I never splice an extension cord after one went bad.  Life is too short and extension cords are cheap.
Credo Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
Non impediti ratione cogitationis
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#14
  Re: Extension cord repair by JosephP (Nicked a cord. Curi...)
All depends on how bad the nick is. Did it just skin the insulation and if so then use some good quality electrical tape to repair. If you nick it enough to cut a few strands then I would do the same as above if just one wire. If many strands were cut then you need to open it up and I would use butt splices to fix and then tape. You could cut and add a male and female end also and then you can have different length chords which can be good also. Whatever you do do not throw out. Worth fixing.
John T.
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#15
  Re: Extension cord repair by JosephP (Nicked a cord. Curi...)
Nick repair is good electrical tape wound and heated a schosh.

Nick near an end means cut off and replace end.

Splice means using solder to join the wires and heat shrink tubing on each wire and on the cord exterior.




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#16
  Re: Extension cord repair by JosephP (Nicked a cord. Curi...)
It cut the black wire...
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#17
  Re: Extension cord repair by JosephP (Nicked a cord. Curi...)
To me it depends on what kind of extension cord this is. If it's a 100' 12-3, I'd sure repair it (or make 2 extensions) depending on where the damage is. But if  it's one of the 25' 14-3 cheapies it might well wind up in the trash (or not, again depending on where the damage is located).
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#18
  Re: Extension cord repair by JosephP (Nicked a cord. Curi...)
1. Slip heat shrink tubing on 

2. Position sleeves in a staggerred fashion so they don't make a lump.

3. Repair using crimper and sleeves. 


4. Slip heat shrink tubing over repair.

I've fixed many power tool cords like this.  It really works quite well and doesn't hang up if done right.  Heat shrink is very tough.
Everything is a prototype so its a one of a kind.
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#19
  Re: Extension cord repair by JosephP (Nicked a cord. Curi...)
OSHA says discard. No tape or splice. But they ain't buying them. Last I heard you cannot put new ends on either.

My boss is a Jewish carpenter. Our DADDY owns the business.
Trying to understand some people is like trying to pick up the clean end of a turd.
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#20
  Re: Extension cord repair by JosephP (Nicked a cord. Curi...)
Hmmmm....hadn't thought about the OSHA angle. Will make sure not to use a repaired cord on the job site.
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