Hollowing tool recommendations
#11
  
Hello everyone .... I am considering buying a hollowing tool. Although, I'm not going to immediately get into hollowing anything... it sure looks like it would be much easier to make a bowl, with one.

Right now, I use a bowl gauge and I am fair at it. It seems like the hollowing tool that I'm considering can whip out a bowl very quick and safer.

 I'm considering the "D-Way". http://d-waytools.com/hollowing-tools/

What are the thoughts of all you guys? I would like to hear what you all think.
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#12
  Re: Hollowing tool recommendations by MidwestMan (Hello everyone .... ...)
Hollowing tools aren't for bowls.  They are for hollow vessels, where the top opening is smaller in diameter than the widest part of the vessel.  You're not going to get any advantage hollowing out bowls with a hollowing tool.  I recommend watching a couple of videos on bowl making to learn how to more effectively use your bowl gouge.  Mike Mahoney is one.  Bill Grumbine is another.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#13
  Re: Hollowing tool recommendations by MidwestMan (Hello everyone .... ...)
I would suggest either the Lyle Jamieson hollowing tool or the Elbo by Tim Yoder


http://lylejamieson.com/shop/


http://wtwtim.com/elbo%20tool.htm


I think both will fit your needs.



AHill


Remember a hollow form can be anything before it is hollowed out.  I just finished up a calabash form but hollowed it out  with a 3" opening.
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.
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#14
  Re: Hollowing tool recommendations by MidwestMan (Hello everyone .... ...)
I bought the Pro-Forme intermediate set a number of years ago. I'm not much of a hollow form turner and mostly use it to get in the hard to reach reverse curvature areas of the vessels I turn. I like it overall, though if you don't have a very narrow mouth adjustment it will cut very aggressively so it's rather finicky to get the right setting.

I've never used any other system so I have no idea how it compares to other tools.
Cellulose runs through my veins!
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#15
  Re: Hollowing tool recommendations by MidwestMan (Hello everyone .... ...)
Bowl gouge for bowls, hollowing tool for hollow forms
If it don't hold soup, it's ART!!

Dry Creek Woodturning

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#16
  Re: Hollowing tool recommendations by MidwestMan (Hello everyone .... ...)
Thanks for the replies.
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#17
  Re: Hollowing tool recommendations by MidwestMan (Hello everyone .... ...)
(09-14-2017, 12:52 AM)MidwestMan Wrote: Hello everyone .... I am considering buying a hollowing tool. Although, I'm not going to immediately get into hollowing anything... it sure looks like it would be much easier to make a bowl, with one.

Right now, I use a bowl gauge and I am fair at it. It seems like the hollowing tool that I'm considering can whip out a bowl very quick and safer.

 I'm considering the "D-Way". http://d-waytools.com/hollowing-tools/

What are the thoughts of all you guys? I would like to hear what you all think.

Most of the hollowing systems are scrapers at heart. That means that you will usually get a fair amount of tear out at 2 points in the revolution of the turning. For a hollow form where the buyer/admirer can not see or touch those parts of the form, that is no big deal. For something like a bowl or vase large enough to put your hand in, that tear out causes issues.

The exception is something like the termite tool and the similarly shaped cutter on a hollowing system, but the termite is very hard to keep sharp and both of them tend to grab/catch a lot. The version for the hollowing system with the lid that restricts cutting has been on my desire list but they are way too pricey for my budget.

With that as preface, there are basically 4 different approaches to hollowing tools that I have seen:
1) articulating arm
- This is what I bought and like a lot. I got mine from Monster Lathe Tools. The company was basically a WNer until he died. Then his daughter and SIL took on the business. I got the basic system about a year after the WNer passed and I have added components since then. They were always great to work with and their stuff was top notch. Unfortunately, it looks like they closed their business earlier this year. There are some reports that they are trying to restart the business but I am not sure. If they do, I have no hesitation in recommending them on quality and integrity.
2) captive system
- Lyle Jamieson's (in Arlin's link) is probably the best known commercial version and is very well made and Lyle is a pleasure to work with. I have used homemade versions of these at the shops of fellow club members and they are a good way to go whether you build your own or buy one from Lyle or his competition.
3) forearm brace hollowing tools
- The Stinger/Scorpion were the market leaders in this type (IMHO). It is like take a forearm crutch brace and attaching a hollowing tool to it after a pistol grip. So far, my imagination about what happens in a bad catch has prevented me from trying this type.
4) hand held turning tools
- Best Wood Tools and Hunter both make carbide tools with hooked ends and Sorby makes several versions. For experimenting with hollowing and doing a few vessels, these are quite good. You have to be attentive about how flat you keep the shaft and how fast you cut.

The D-Way link that you posted is a cross between types 2 & 4. It would not be my first choice.

In all cases, one of the most important things to remember is to stop frequently and get the sawdust and shavings out of the vessel. If the shavings fill up the vessel, they will build up against the tool and blow out the sides of the vessel (or, worse, cause it to shatter at full speed).

There is nothing wrong with learning to use a hollowing system on bowls and cups other than the tear out that I mentioned at the beginning. It just is not optimum if the bowl is open enough to use a gouge all the way around the inside surface.

Also, the systems tend to have options for laser assistance with wall thickness. Stuart Batty worked out using an inspection camera and monitor instead of the laser,. That approach is a huge improvement over the laser.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
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#18
  Re: Hollowing tool recommendations by MidwestMan (Hello everyone .... ...)
Thank you for your detailed thoughts, IClark. After further consideration, I'll just continue to use the bowl gouge. I really liked what I have learned so far, in regards to using a bowl gouge.

I think, I need to further learn how to use it and more importantly, learn about the uses for the other shaped bowl gouges. Right now I use a 5/8" V groove Thompson bowl gouge. Although it seems to me, the groove is U shaped.

I see different types of bowl gouges, and I don't know what specific uses they have. The one spot in my bowls, that I have trouble with is the bottom/side. (you know, that area that transitions from the side to the bottom. I prefer an acute turn to the bottom, but that is hard for me to do. (LOL, without a catch I mean).

I'm getting better at clearing that area of the bowl, but even when successful, it doesn't seem to sand out nicely. I get a "ring around the bottom" that doesn't seem to sand out. Heck I spend more time sanding than making the things. I am guessing that I am compressing the fibers in that area in some way.

Oh well, I don't know. I am also afraid of hitting that area with the scraper because the scraper grabs a lot more in that "corner". I think that I need to make a much longer and heavier handle for the scraper (give me a more secure feel with the tool).

I will keep looking around youtube for more instruction. It would be great to watch someone, who knows what they are doing ( for a given situation ). I've learned a great deal from Brendan Stemp so far.

Thank you all again for the comments so far.
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#19
  Re: Hollowing tool recommendations by MidwestMan (Hello everyone .... ...)
You are welcome.

If the ring in the bottom curve of the bowl is sort of shiny, it is possibly due to the heel of the gouge's bevel rubbing as one turns that corner. The heel is burnishing the wood at that point in the curve. That is why some turners use a double-bevel on their gouges: the primary cutting bevel, and a relief bevel (technically a chamfer) on the heel of the bevel to give clearance in a tighter curve. The main drawback to the double-bevel is the smaller length of the main bevel that results in less forgiveness in a gentle curve. You could try just breaking the corner at the heel of the bevel and see if that changes the ring.

On the scrapers catching, it helps if you can get the end of the tool rest inside the bowl to give more support (less over hang) and then keep the scraper level and slightly above center on the inside of the bowl. Using a drop point scraper with a fresh burr really helps with that final cleanup.

Richard Raffin and Glenn Lucas both learned their craft as production bowl turners. Glenn still makes most of his living doing bowls. I can recommend the DVD's from both of them. They are both phenomenal to watch in person and are both excellent teachers. I have taken small group (5 or 6 students) classes from Richard and would love to do it again. So far, I have only attended the demos by Glenn and talked to him between demos. He does an exceptional job of teaching what he is doing during a demo. Taking classes from Glenn is high on my bucket list.
"the most important safety feature on any tool is the one between your ears." - Ken Vick

A wish for you all:  May you keep buying green bananas.
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#20
  Re: Hollowing tool recommendations by MidwestMan (Hello everyone .... ...)
(09-14-2017, 12:52 AM)MidwestMan Wrote: Hello everyone .... I am considering buying a hollowing tool. Although, I'm not going to immediately get into hollowing anything... it sure looks like it would be much easier to make a bowl, with one.

Right now, I use a bowl gauge and I am fair at it. It seems like the hollowing tool that I'm considering can whip out a bowl very quick and safer.

 I'm considering the "D-Way". http://d-waytools.com/hollowing-tools/

What are the thoughts of all you guys? I would like to hear what you all think.
Are you perhaps wanting a coring tool, quite different than a hollowing tool. If so, check out the one made by Oneway.
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