Lapping station question
#11
  
Men,

For awhile now I've used a piece of MDF as my "lapping station" and put down some sticky back sandpaper and went to work... both to flatten back of irons and smoothing plane bottoms.

I accidentally bought some dang resin glue backed paper... lol that stuff aint comin off...   Don't have any more MDF in the shop, and instead of buying some, I thought I'd do it right and get a piece of float glass.

Local glass shop can cut me a piece of 3/8" glass, 36" long, and 12" wide for around $60.  

Would I be happy with this? Or is there a better alternative? (I am only vaguely worried about the cost... I know I can probably find something for free, but my free time is limited...)

My plan calls for this to be a semi permanent setup on a spare counter top over in the corner of the shop.
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#12
  Re: Lapping station question by Strokes77 (Men, For awhile n...)
(10-04-2017, 11:24 AM)Strokes77 Wrote: Men,

For awhile now I've used a piece of MDF as my "lapping station" and put down some sticky back sandpaper and went to work... both to flatten back of irons and smoothing plane bottoms.

I accidentally bought some dang resin glue backed paper... lol that stuff aint comin off...   Don't have any more MDF in the shop, and instead of buying some, I thought I'd do it right and get a piece of float glass.

Local glass shop can cut me a piece of 3/8" glass, 36" long, and 12" wide for around $60.  

Would I be happy with this? Or is there a better alternative? (I am only vaguely worried about the cost... I know I can probably find something for free, but my free time is limited...)

My plan calls for this to be a semi permanent setup on a spare counter top over in the corner of the shop.

A granite sink cutout would probably be cheaper, but they are quite heavy to move around.  A cabinet-top shop would have them.  If you live close to Chicago, I'll give you one. Winkgrin
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#13
  Re: RE: Lapping station question by Mike Brady ([quote='Strokes77' p...)
(10-04-2017, 11:37 AM)Mike Brady Wrote: A granite sink cutout would probably be cheaper, but they are quite heavy to move around.  A cabinet-top shop would have them.  If you live close to Chicago, I'll give you one. Winkgrin

I'll check on this.  Thank you.  I assume this would be "flat enough"?  

and by flat I mean... woodworker flat.  I don't own feeler gauges.
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#14
  Re: Lapping station question by Strokes77 (Men, For awhile n...)
A polished granite tile from the big box store will be, over the width of a plane iron, most probably as flat as a tool room grade surface plate.
Typically obtained for around 4 to 5 bucks. Spring for some adhesive backed rubber feet, probably another 1$ and you'll be all set.

Ron
"which plane should I use for this task?......the sharp one"

http://www.breseplane.blogspot.com/
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#15
  Re: Lapping station question by Strokes77 (Men, For awhile n...)
(10-04-2017, 11:24 AM)Strokes77 Wrote: Men,

For awhile now I've used a piece of MDF as my "lapping station" and put down some sticky back sandpaper and went to work... both to flatten back of irons and smoothing plane bottoms.

I accidentally bought some dang resin glue backed paper... lol that stuff aint comin off...   Don't have any more MDF in the shop, and instead of buying some, I thought I'd do it right and get a piece of float glass.

Local glass shop can cut me a piece of 3/8" glass, 36" long, and 12" wide for around $60.  

Would I be happy with this? Or is there a better alternative? (I am only vaguely worried about the cost... I know I can probably find something for free, but my free time is limited...)

My plan calls for this to be a semi permanent setup on a spare counter top over in the corner of the shop.

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/grani...-2-a-grade

or enco has some as well

This will serve you for more than just lapping blades. And you know it to be flat. I tried a sink cutout and was disappointed
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#16
  Re: Lapping station question by Strokes77 (Men, For awhile n...)
Grizzly got some that are good enuf

http://www.grizzly.com/products/9-x-12-x...rizzly.com
Elvem ipsum etiam vivere
No Evaporust was used on these tools.
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#17
  Re: RE: Lapping station question by Admiral (Grizzly got some tha...)
(10-04-2017, 06:07 PM)Admiral Wrote: Grizzly got some that are good enuf

http://www.grizzly.com/products/9-x-12-x...rizzly.com

Plus 1. Works great for scary sharp.
"As God is my witness, I thought turkeys could fly!" Arthur 'Big Guy' Carlson
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#18
  Re: RE: Lapping station question by Johnbro ([quote='Admiral' pid...)
I am with Ron, get a granite tile at a big box.  I have a couple of granite surface plates, awfully heavy to move around.  I put some lapping film on a piece of granite cutoff, even that is pretty heavy.  I bought two pieces of granite tile, and use them all the time, easy to put on the bench and put back when done.
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#19
  Re: RE: Lapping station question by barryvabeach (I am with Ron, get a...)
(10-04-2017, 08:30 PM)barryvabeach Wrote: I am with Ron, get a granite tile at a big box.  I have a couple of granite surface plates, awfully heavy to move around.  I put some lapping film on a piece of granite cutoff, even that is pretty heavy.  I bought two pieces of granite tile, and use them all the time, easy to put on the bench and put back when done.

My concern with a tile is not being large enough to lap a plane sole.  Not that a #4 is big, but I seem to do a lot of these, and I feel like longer strokes are more efficient for me.
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#20
  Re: Lapping station question by Strokes77 (Men, For awhile n...)
I use a piece of melamine that's around 48 inches long and around 20 inches wide. Don't know if I got lucky, but it's flat and it's easy to move around. I rehab a fair amount of planes and the length allows me to use nice, long strokes which I find helps me keep it square. The Psa sandpaper peels off pretty easily and a little 409 takes care of any residual adhesive.
Currently a smarta$$ but hoping to one day graduate to wisea$$
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