Krenov jointer?
#9
  
I've just finished making two Krenov style planes, a 7" block plane and a 9" smoother. They're great little planes, and they were fun to make. I'd like to make another, and I wonder if I might make a jointer? David Finck suggests a 17" jointer with a 1 1/2" iron. Does anyone have any experience with longer Krenov style planes? Any advice?
Reply
#10
  Re: Krenov jointer? by overland (I've just finished m...)
Krenov didn't like handles, mostly using smoothing planes as adjuncts to power stock prep. Someone has probably made jointer plane without a tote or handle, but I have not seen it. A handle is useful. Also, a long plane is likely heavy enough. You may find it useful to look for places to remove weight, as is done in a razee plane. Use a cap iron.

A jointer should be straight, so you want to be sure yours will stay that way. Straight, properly dried stock with growth rings parallel to the sole will give you your best shot. I suppose a Krenov style plane could be laminated from several pieces of stable quartersawn stock. This might be easier to find than properly dried thicker stock.
"Consider it tuition; every mistake you make, if you're paying attention, improves your skills, and allows you to make ever more sophisticated mistakes. "
Bill Houghton
Reply
#11
  Re: Krenov jointer? by overland (I've just finished m...)
(11-02-2017, 02:39 PM)overland Wrote: I've just finished making two Krenov style planes, a 7" block plane and a 9" smoother. They're great little planes, and they were fun to make. I'd like to make another, and I wonder if I might make a jointer? David Finck suggests a 17" jointer with a 1 1/2" iron. Does anyone have any experience with longer Krenov style planes? Any advice?
Scott Meek makes one - got to touch it at the Lie-Nielson Toolworks a few years ago. Gorgeous unit.
Thanks,  Curt
-----------------
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards."
      -- Soren Kierkegaard
Reply
#12
  Re: Krenov jointer? by overland (I've just finished m...)
(11-02-2017, 02:39 PM)overland Wrote: I've just finished making two Krenov style planes, a 7" block plane and a 9" smoother. They're great little planes, and they were fun to make. I'd like to make another, and I wonder if I might make a jointer? David Finck suggests a 17" jointer with a 1 1/2" iron. Does anyone have any experience with longer Krenov style planes? Any advice?

I sure have. I thought I had a photo but apparently not, sorry. Mine is 24" long, which has been terrific for flattening longer boards.

I made it from Bubinga. When you buy thick Bubinga, you get what you get so I ignored the conventional advice about grain orientation. It has stayed remarkably flat over the several years I've had it. I touch it up occasionally (rarely!) with a few stroked on 150 grit laid down on my tailed jointer. It has a nice mass to it (I like the heft -- some people wouldn't), and with a little camellia oil on the bottom it's easy to use.

A couple of things I would do differently. I used a 1 3/4" blade. I have large hands but if I had a do-over, I'd go 1 1/2.

I tried to shape a hand grip, kind of like this one (a jack plane I made).





I still think it's the right place for a hand hold, but shaping it that way was a dumb idea. It's too restrictive. Some day I'll cut most of that extra stuff and shape half a pitcher's mound right behind the blade, which I think will be comfortable but wouldn't lock me in so much.

Incidentally, I use the jointer plane for face and edge work. It's unwieldy for edges. I plan to make a second, narrower one specifically for edge jointing. That's the great thing about these homemade planes -- you can have two instead of one, for not much money.

You might like a tight mouth on a smoother, but it's not necessary on a jointer plane.

Finally, for edge jointing, but a slight radius on the blade or David Charlesworth will come after you.

Post pics!
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
Reply
#13
  Re: Krenov jointer? by overland (I've just finished m...)
Here are my first efforts. The smoother is maple and cocobolo, the block plane is some sort of rosewood. I left them a little crudely finished. But they work pretty well.
   
Reply
#14
  Re: RE: Krenov jointer? by overland (Here are my first ef...)
(11-14-2017, 09:53 PM)overland Wrote: Here are my first efforts. The smoother is maple and cocobolo, the block plane is some sort of rosewood. I left them a little crudely finished. But they work pretty well.

Looks great! Fun, aren't they? Now we need action shots. Shavings, please.  Big Grin
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
Reply
#15
  Re: Krenov jointer? by overland (I've just finished m...)
I took a workshop instructed buy Craig Vandall Stavens, who studied under Krenov. He had what I recall to be about an 18" wooden plane, a la Krenov, he'd made out of a piece of heavy, very stable tropical hardwood. He didn't know what kind of wood it was. The iron was narrow, <2". It was Stevens' favorite plane. He used it for a lot of flattening jobs. I specifically remember him using it to flatten the top of a drawer he'd built by pulling the plane around the perimeter of the top to even out any irregularities at the corners. The plane was just a rectangular block with no handle. It didn't have a curved profile like some Kernov planes. Stevens was particularly fond of Japanese planes, so I guess he made his in the Japanese style. I don't know if you would call it a jointer, but he used it as one.
Reply
#16
  Re: Krenov jointer? by overland (I've just finished m...)
I don't know about the longer planes,  but on the shorter ones I made, the curved surfaces make them very comfortable to hold. I like the rounded front of the smoother and, in fact, since I took the photo above I have worked on the smaller plane a little more to round off the front. It makes it easier to hold.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)