Electric outlet placement on column
#25
  Re: RE: Electric outlet placement on column by OneStaple ([quote=Cooler]I had ...)
(01-10-2018, 12:44 PM)OneStaple Wrote: I would use THHN, except that doing so would require me to use conduit for the full length of the run, not just the final exposed section.  And I don't currently have any THHN, so I'd have to buy three rolls.  From my understanding, NM-B is fine in this situation where the conduit is being used just for protection on a relatively short run, not as a fully enclosed conduit "system".

You can run NM-B to a back side clamp of an exposed metal j-box and go THHN from there. NM-B can be used for "short runs" in conduit, but does this qualify? Not sure.

I agree using a GFCI breaker is the simple solution. If you don't like it, you can swap it after inspection. Your 100 amp panel likely has way more circuits than you intend to use so the large GFCI (or even AFCI) should be of little consequence.
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#26
  Re: Electric outlet placement on column by OneStaple (Hey All, First, I...)
Roly Wrote:Remember the 50 amp 240v receptacle needs more space than the other receptacles. Also you would be hard pressed to enter the back of the box as far as bending radius. Is that chase at the top used as a air duct, such as a cold air return in it self ? If so other rules apply as to cables in it. Roly
I'll just be putting a 30A breaker and receptacle in for now, but I'll leave room to upgrade to 50A later. I'll make sure I can accommodate a 50A receptacle. The chase at the top only encases an I-beam supported by the post. There are air ducts going through other parts of the garage, but wires only go near/next to them, never inside.

Bob10 Wrote:Hell he could just put in a GFI breaker and no more worries

or isolate just the one breaker on the column
Yeah, but a GFCI breaker is way more expensive than a GFCI outlet. I'd lean toward using a GFCI outlet on the column and a separate one to protect down-stream outlets.

Mr_Mike Wrote:NM-B can be used for "short runs" in conduit, but does this qualify? Not sure.

I agree using a GFCI breaker is the simple solution. If you don't like it, you can swap it after inspection.
I'm certainly not an expert, but my research has suggested that if the conduit terminates on both ends (such as on a junction box), it is considered as conduit and must be treated with the proper fill ratings. NM-B can still be used, but you don't get much in conduit before you've reached max capacity. If the conduit is used as a "short" length of protective covering (usually meaning it's open on one end), then the fill ratings don't apply. What scares me is that "short" seems to be open to interpretation, but full length pieces of conduit are often accepted. I would need to make approximately a 4' run through conduit.

No comment on swapping out anything GFCI related after inspection.

Thanks,
Tyler
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#27
  Re: Electric outlet placement on column by OneStaple (Hey All, First, I...)
I thought I should clarify something regarding the conduit. There are two possible locations for the junction box at the top of the column (red box and green box in the picture).

The red box is up on the ceiling, where the wires are fed from. A junction here would allow me to avoid a down-and-back scenario completely (ignoring the GFCI issue). NM-B wires would still be fed from the junction box behind drywall for a few feet before exiting the drywall in conduit. I this case, the conduit would be purely protective for the last 4'.

The green box is just above the column. In this case, the junction box would connect to the conduit, and therefore fill factors on the conduit would have to be observed. NM-B would transition to THHN or similar. Having the junction box here would require a short piece of down-and-back of NM-B from the ceiling, including passing through holes (currently not existing) in a 2x4 (non structural).

Having the junction box on the ceiling would be easier logistically, especially regarding punching holes in that 2x4. Or, I guess, I could also do two junction boxes.

Tyler


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#28
  Re: Electric outlet placement on column by OneStaple (Hey All, First, I...)
New York regulations state that the GFCI outlets have to be below 6½ feet.

It is recommended that the overhead lights not be on the GFCI circuit so that the lights don't go out if there is a ground fault.

My electrician installed a GFCI outlet in my darkroom because of the sink.  My laundry area is not protected as it was built in 1953.  I should update I guess.
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