Experience with Lee Valley's inset vise?
#9
  
I've been thinking for a while that what is, these days, called a wagon vise might be a good solution for my workbench.  I'd even acquired some Jorgensen veneer press screws to make my own.  But I'm now contemplating the Lee Valley Inset Vise, this one:


and wondering if anyone here has any experience with it, or opinions on it.  I'm really behind on shop projects, and would put off any final decision on this, except that there was a recent conversation about a Lee Valley tool that's been discontinued, and I'm thinking that I should perhaps buy it while it's available.
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#10
  Re: Experience with Lee Valley's inset vise? by Bill_Houghton (I've been thinking f...)
I have had one for 5 years on my bench. It works exactly as intended. I purchased the extra "smaller" size insert that helps with thin pieces.

It is great for using the plough plane for edges because it can hold very close to the edge of the bench. It does a fine job holding boards for face planing as well.

I use the "clamp in the vice" trick alot with my face vise, but there is still a place for the inset vise in my workflow...

Having pop up dog holes already in position or quickly moveable is the key to make it really useful and efficient.

I recommend it and it fits my needs. Their full size end vise would be better, but this was easy and cheap.
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#11
  Re: Experience with Lee Valley's inset vise? by Bill_Houghton (I've been thinking f...)
Bill-

I have one on my bench and it has worked well for me.  I bought the pivoting jaw to hold irregular shapes, but the standard jaw can be  reversed to put a curved surface towards the work and is almost as handy.  The screw is small compared to other wagon vises I have seen, but it seems to have all the power necessary to hold the things I work on and I haven't seen any sign of premature wear.  The handle can be swiveled to be in line with the screw and you can twirl it between your finger to speed up opening or closing the vise.  One small niggle is that the openings on either side of the traveling jaw aren't open and tend to accumulate saw dust and shavings (and any thing else that can fall into them), but it is easy to clean them out and I seldom have any problem with debris interfering with the action of the vise.  Installation isn't difficult and well documented with the info that comes with the vise.  You can take a look at it on the LV website for the vise by clicking on the "Instr" link.

Phil
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#12
  Re: Experience with Lee Valley's inset vise? by Bill_Houghton (I've been thinking f...)
    I have one. Works just fine.
Mark Singleton

Bene Vivere Quam Optima Est Ultio
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#13
  Re: Experience with Lee Valley's inset vise? by Bill_Houghton (I've been thinking f...)
Thanks, all.  My bench top is a solid core door, and I have learned that solid core doors will warp if the door skin is removed on one side only (the core expands/contracts with humidity, unrestrained by the “uncovered” side).  I’m considering cutting the first, narrower mortise for the vise all the way through the bench top, then screwing a piece of 1/4” metal stock underneath the resulting slot, to stabilize it.  Should I be concerned about the strength of the vise body in terms of any sideways pressures? I've asked Lee Valley this same question, but figured field experience is good too.
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#14
  Re: RE: Experience with Lee Valley's inset vise? by Bill_Houghton ([size=large][font=Ar...)
(02-12-2018, 01:16 PM)Bill_Houghton Wrote: Thanks, all.  My bench top is a solid core door, SNIP>>>

So, is that a 2-hr door? My plans always seem to be full of Gypsum.
Bruce
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#15
  Re: RE: Experience with Lee Valley's inset vise? by hbmcc ([quote='Bill_Houghto...)
(02-12-2018, 08:39 PM)hbmcc Wrote: So, is that a 2-hr door? My plans always seem to be full of Gypsum.

No, I had one of those once but got rid of it.  This is just an older commercial solid core door, heavy and solid, but all wood as far as I know.
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#16
  Re: Experience with Lee Valley's inset vise? by Bill_Houghton (I've been thinking f...)
I would not worry about pressure on the sides of the vise. In use, the
force is along the center line of course. As long as you mount it solidly
in a well cut opening, it should work fine in a solid core door. Your idea
of a metal plate underneath seems like it would help too.

If I ever decide to build a larger bench, I will probably "upgrade" to a
larger vise. But , I would keep the Veritas vise , perhaps on a saw bench
or something. It is very handy to use.
Mark Singleton

Bene Vivere Quam Optima Est Ultio
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