Will this window framing idea work?
#36
  Re: Will this window framing idea work? by Wild Turkey ([attachment=8232] ...)
   

Those black lines were spaces to make the column 12" wide.  Replaced with one more King Stud.

Think this would pass?
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Wild Turkey
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(joined 10/1999)
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#37
  Re: Will this window framing idea work? by Wild Turkey ([attachment=8232] ...)
this is the best picture i could find of some townhomes i framed back in 2005. you can see the front walls were just about all window. both corners had a wall buck as on the left side of the one picture. we had 2 studs on the inside- one a king stud and one jack stud.it was one solid header across the top and the 2 by 4's in between were basically jack studs( you dont have to do that because you have the room for seperate headers for each window with a king and jack stud on each side of the header- we didnt have the room- theyre only double 2 by 4 between each window.).
as the picture shows, there wasnt much framing in them front walls. AFTER everything was framed, the walls were very stable and sound- no chance of racking.
something to take  into consideration is everything ABOVE the wall youre constructing- theres going to be trusses keeping the building from racking side to side, then the plywood on the roof helps keeps from racking front to back- or vise versa.

in the picture of those townhomes, it was the 2nd floor trusses tieing them together to help keep from racking, but even when we stood those front walls- after framing,squaring,and sheeting- they were solid. the plywood below the windows held them square better than youd think.
on what youre doing, the trusses and roof sheeting will do the same.

one other thing:
stick with 16" O.C. framing. lay out your openings on the plates, then lay out the studs, which looks like will be mainly cripples under the windows.


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#38
  Re: RE: Will this window framing idea work? by Wild Turkey ([attachment=8295] ...)
(02-17-2018, 01:31 PM)Wild Turkey Wrote: Those black lines were spaces to make the column 12" wide.  Replaced with one more King Stud.

Think this would pass?

That looks right to me. No spaces between king studs. Nail them tightly together. You get your strength in the king studs by nailing them tightly together. If you need space between windows, frame out the rough openings a little wider and trim out the inside of your rough openings on each side or one side with 1x material to accommodate the window size..
 
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#39
  Re: Will this window framing idea work? by Wild Turkey ([attachment=8232] ...)
When I really look at the many samples that have been posted here I see that there are some slight differences. Things are changing all the time. The way window openings are/were typically framed, there is a built up header installed between two king studs tight to the bottom of the lower plate (although dbl. plates are not always required). A jack stud transfers the load to the shoe. Sometimes it is interrupted by the sill. Sometimes two jack studs are required, which used to only be considered when using engineered lumber for long spans. Typically first floor window and door headers were dbl. 2 x10's, and dbl. 2 x 8's on the second floor. Then taller ceilings started to become more desirable so we would add 2x's to the header to keep the windows around 6'-8" A.F.F.; but it was still all wood above doors and windows. The next phase was to use less wood. The Capes and Ranches popular in the 50's had 4 x 6 headers all around. They are plenty strong enough in most cases, but now with higher ceilings there's extra space to fill in, and how that was done created some concern. The code addressed this by de-rating the allowable load for a header by 30% if it wasn't tight to the plate. They also lowered the nailing requirement to 16d nails top and bottom every 16". I still use my full head stick framer  for a row of nails less than 2" apart, spaced every 12" or less. The newest code is also now specifying 1/2" ply. as part of the built-up header. Originally it was only there as a filler and didn't count for any increased span rating. When people started framing sunroom additions like screened in porches, the codes reacted with "shear walls". A ten or twelve foot window in a fifty foot wall isn't much of a concern.

I've already posted where you can find specific spans for headers in the Code Book. I think there's still a picture of how to frame it too. I would also say that three 9-1/4" L.V.L.'s with dbl. jacks will span the width of three of your windows and all of this discussion would be mute; but you should get a copy of the engineering from your local lumber supplier if you go that route. If you really don't want trouble from an inspector, just do it the same way as the well known builders in your area build. It's a new construction single family residence. I can't see why there would be any surprises or "do-overs".
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
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#40
  Re: Will this window framing idea work? by Wild Turkey ([attachment=8232] ...)
I wanted to add that the new International Codes are actually making it easier for Builders. When I first got my license, I had to deal with modules of elasticity and extreme force in bending for the species and grade of structural lumber I was using. Most of the inspectors didn't know how or want to. They would ask for an Engineering Stamp for anything out of the ordinary. The codes allow us and the Inspectors to just look it up on a table in the Book. Now that Inspectors are getting used to these accepted standards, I can just ask my supplier to print out the design load calculations from the manufactures software and submit it with my plans.

If you're planning on building your own home or addition I have a few suggestions. Look at new construction in your area, see how thing are being done, and ask what the local Inspector has been looking at closely lately. (It changes frequently) If you ask the "right way" with a box of Joe and few dozen doughnuts, or buy the beer after work (or both), You just might get a few to come to your job and give you a few pointers. I must point out though, that hiring their men without asking the boss first is unacceptable in most trades.
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
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