Need grinder advice
#31
  Re: RE: Need grinder advice by Strokes77 (I might get flamed f...)
(03-10-2018, 10:24 AM)Strokes77 Wrote: I might get flamed for this... But I'm gonna say it anyway.
You might can buy yourself some time if you just change your microbevel to a higher angle...
If you have a 25 degree primary, and a 30 degree micro.. and the micro is getting too big to sharpen fast anymore, as a quick fix, just change your micro to 33-35* and start over with it... 
I would suggest you won't find any practical difference in your work...
***This is just an idea... a practical quick fix.. not meant to be a "sharpening thread", and not meant to represent "best practice"...

I understand what you're saying, and that has happened with some of my blades.  But I do mainly paring with my chisels, and a few degrees added to the bevel is noticeable.  I'm now at a point where several chisels and planes need re-beveling and I just want a quick way of getting that done, as opposed to my coarse diamond plate which isn't so coarse any more.
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#32
  Re: Need grinder advice by Bart Hovis (I have a bunch of ch...)
Here's a suggestion that you should at least look at.

I have over 200 handplanes and 600 chisels. I give sharpening lessons to beginners in my shop. Most hobby woodworkers rarely have to work on creating a new primary bevel, but I have to do it on dozens of chisels per month because I also restore tools.

Fastest and easiest way to do it? 3 items:

1) Grinder. I have a variable speed, but any inexpensive one will be fine.
2) RoboRest. Made by WNs own RoboHippie. Brainless grinder tool rest. Easy to use and affordable.
3) Upgrade the grinder stones. If you can afford a CBN wheel or two, they are your best choice and they will last forever. Really. If you buy from Woodworkers Wonders, grab the concentric washers also, they ensure your wheels run true. Otherwise, just get a set of the white grinder wheels. They are decent.

This setup can run anywhere from $220 up to $400 depending on which options you choose, but if you can find a used grinder, you can save even more.

You will never find a faster, more reliable, or easier to use setup than that. You'll spend a little more up front, but you'll thank yourself every time you use it.
" The founding fathers weren't trying to protect citizens' rights to have an interesting hobby." I Learn Each Day 1/18/13

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#33
  Re: Need grinder advice by Bart Hovis (I have a bunch of ch...)
I'll jump in here as someone who uses a WS3000 to establish bevels and even for honing on my beater chisels. I love it. There is almost no learning curve. I can put a new bevel on a chipped edge in seconds. I also provide some instruction to newbs and the only thing I have to caution them on is overheating. It's also a lot less money than the other powered sharpener discussed here.
Currently a smarta$$ but hoping to one day graduate to wisea$$
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#34
  Re: RE: Need grinder advice by Gregory of Sherwood Forest (Here's a suggestion ...)
(03-10-2018, 11:30 PM)Gregory of Sherwood Forest Wrote: Here's a suggestion that you should at least look at.

I have over 200 handplanes and 600 chisels. I give sharpening lessons to beginners in my shop. Most hobby woodworkers rarely have to work on creating a new primary bevel, but I have to do it on dozens of chisels per month because I also restore tools.

Fastest and easiest way to do it? 3 items:

1) Grinder. I have a variable speed, but any inexpensive one will be fine.
2) RoboRest. Made by WNs own RoboHippie. Brainless grinder tool rest. Easy to use and affordable.
3) Upgrade the grinder stones. If you can afford a CBN wheel or two, they are your best choice and they will last forever. Really. If you buy from Woodworkers Wonders, grab the concentric washers also, they ensure your wheels run true. Otherwise, just get a set of the white grinder wheels. They are decent.

This setup can run anywhere from $220 up to $400 depending on which options you choose, but if you can find a used grinder, you can save even more.

You will never find a faster, more reliable, or easier to use setup than that. You'll spend a little more up front, but you'll thank yourself every time you use it.

+1, I use an "estate sale special" 1960s craftsman bench grinder with a norton sg wheel I got off ebay for 30 bucks and some cheap made-in-china T-shaped diamond dresser. I have a belt grinder and a tormek as well, and while the belt grinder will hog off material faster and the tormek will remove material cooler and very precisely, the bench grinder option works so well I've considered selling off my tormek and have relegated to the belt grinder to other duties. The only reason I really keep the tormek around now is for Japanese tools that I'm worried are too sensitive to the temperatures of dry grinding (and if white steel/blue steel can tolerate the temps, then I'm selling the tormek lol).
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#35
  Re: Need grinder advice by Bart Hovis (I have a bunch of ch...)
Bart

I got this kind from Grizzly 5 years ago and never got the hang of it and sold it but it worked really well.

http://www.grizzly.com/products/8-Grinde...er/T10097A

At the time it was only $79
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#36
  Re: Need grinder advice by Bart Hovis (I have a bunch of ch...)
(03-09-2018, 12:30 PM)mBart Hovis Wrote: I have a bunch of chisels and plane blades that need to have the primary bevel re-established.  I've been sharpening secondary bevels so long they're not very secondary any more. 

I've always used coarse diamond stones for this purpose, but mine are so worn that they're not coarse enough any more.  Besides, it's too much time & effort.  I've been pondering getting a grinder for years, but don't have the money for a Baldor, and the less expensive grinders get bad reviews.  So I'm thinking about a WS 3000, or Veritas power sharpener.  The Veritas is more expensive and almost out of reach for me.

So, I'd really appreciate opinions on using the WS 3000 for grinding bevels.  And, is the Veritas better and worth getting even with the higher price?

Thanks very much!

Bart, I have been posting about CBN wheels for a few years now. They have been around a long time, but were almost the exclusive domain of turners. Now they are becoming better understood among flat woodworkers. They are a real game changer for grinding ....

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/WoodworkTec...SetUp.html

Ideally you need a grinder with a bit of oomph to power the wheel, since it is heavy. For this reaon a 8" is better (since they have more powerful motors), but a 6" works if you find one with a good motor. Get the grinder first, then the wheel. Aim for 180 grit for the wheel. Excellent all rounder. Woodturners Wonders have given me the best service. 

The wheels never wear, so never need dressing, and you do not need to change settings. They cut fast, and are nearly as cool as a Tormek. 

The wheels are not cheap, but they are a one-off expense. You also need to factor in a decent tool rest. I use one from Tormek. Veritas is good as well. 

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#37
  Re: RE: Need grinder advice by Derek Cohen ([quote='mBart Hovis'...)
(03-15-2018, 07:57 PM)Derek Cohen Wrote: Bart, I have been posting about CBN wheels for a few years now. They have been around a long time, but were almost the exclusive domain of turners. Now they are becoming better understood among flat woodworkers. They are a real game changer for grinding ....

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/WoodworkTec...SetUp.html

Ideally you need a grinder with a bit of oomph to power the wheel, since it is heavy. For this reaon a 8" is better (since they have more powerful motors), but a 6" works if you find one with a good motor. Get the grinder first, then the wheel. Aim for 180 grit for the wheel. Excellent all rounder. Woodturners Wonders have given me the best service. 

The wheels never wear, so never need dressing, and you do not need to change settings. They cut fast, and are nearly as cool as a Tormek. 

The wheels are not cheap, but they are a one-off expense. You also need to factor in a decent tool rest. I use one from Tormek. Veritas is good as well. 

Regards from Perth

Derek


Derek, which wheel from that website would you recommend for an all around CBN wheel. I am looking at the Spartan 8" and at their cost, I could get 2 if needed. After 180 grit, what would be the next one to get? Or should I just stick with the 180?
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#38
  Re: Need grinder advice by Bart Hovis (I have a bunch of ch...)
Scoony, I would not get a Spartan wheel. I really do not know what they are like, however one of the benefits I seek in a CBN wheel is its cool grinding. The all-metal wheels I have are like large heat-sinks. The Spartan wheel does not look like it can function that way. Stick to a tried-and-true metal 180 grit.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#39
  Re: RE: Need grinder advice by Derek Cohen (Scoony, I would not ...)
(03-16-2018, 11:50 AM)Derek Cohen Wrote: Scoony, I would not get a Spartan wheel. I really do not know what they are like, however one of the benefits I seek in a CBN wheel is its cool grinding. The all-metal wheels I have are like large heat-sinks. The Spartan wheel does not look like it can function that way. Stick to a tried-and-true metal 180 grit.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Thanks, just ordered one.
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#40
  Re: RE: Need grinder advice by Scoony ([quote='Derek Cohen'...)
(03-17-2018, 06:30 PM)Scoony Wrote: Thanks, just ordered one.

Scoony, which wheel did you order?  I was looking at the Spartan wheel, too, and it says it's aluminum.
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