Miniwax Polycrylic
#21
  Re: RE: Miniwax Polycrylic by Cooler ([quote='Scoony' pid=...)
(03-27-2018, 03:39 PM)Cooler Wrote: I always finish drawer interiors or they get filthy looking in a hurry and you cannot wash it clean.

Dang, what are you keeping in them drawers? Actually don't want to know the answer.

Bare wooden drawers can be wiped out with a damp cloth or simply vacuumed out as necessary. More importantly, some finishes can react badly with clothing items. Oil based finishes can ruin clothing items.

Before I got into woodworking, I bought a new unfinished dresser. I stained and finished it to include the drawers.  I ended up ruining a bunch of clothes doing that as the stain transferred to the clothing items.
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#22
  Re: RE: Miniwax Polycrylic by Scoony ([quote='Cooler' pid=...)
(03-28-2018, 12:00 PM)Scoony Wrote: Dang, what are you keeping in them drawers? Actually don't want to know the answer.

Bare wooden drawers can be wiped out with a damp cloth or simply vacuumed out as necessary. More importantly, some finishes can react badly with clothing items. Oil based finishes can ruin clothing items.

Before I got into woodworking, I bought a new unfinished dresser. I stained and finished it to include the drawers.  I ended up ruining a bunch of clothes doing that as the stain transferred to the clothing items.

I finish the inside of kitchen cabinet drawers, not shop utility drawers.  I do that for the reasons stated in my first post.  I don't worry about dirt in my shop drawers.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#23
  Re: RE: Miniwax Polycrylic by Scoony ([quote='Cooler' pid=...)
(03-28-2018, 12:00 PM)Scoony Wrote: Dang, what are you keeping in them drawers? Actually don't want to know the answer.

Bare wooden drawers can be wiped out with a damp cloth or simply vacuumed out as necessary. More importantly, some finishes can react badly with clothing items. Oil based finishes can ruin clothing items.

Before I got into woodworking, I bought a new unfinished dresser. I stained and finished it to include the drawers.  I ended up ruining a bunch of clothes doing that as the stain transferred to the clothing items.

I never stain them.  I used to use Deft brushing lacquer because it dried so quickly.  So does shellac.  But both have a lingering odor if in an enclosed space like a drawer.  I now use brush on acrylic.  I think the next time I will brush the finish on prior to installing the bottoms.  It should be easier.
No animals were injured or killed in the production of this post.
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#24
  Re: Miniwax Polycrylic by Gibbcutter (For years I stuck by...)
Yes. Apply your finish to the insides before sliding that bottom in and attaching it.
Steve





Working on it Winkgrin





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#25
  Re: Miniwax Polycrylic by Gibbcutter (For years I stuck by...)
(03-25-2018, 01:06 PM)Gibbcutter Wrote: For years I stuck by oil based finishes. Just used Miniwax’s Polycrylic satin. Very impressed. Looks great and easy to use. This could become my topcoat of choice.

Yes to the WB products.  They have come a long way.  I still use oils or lacquers mostly but do recommend to people that don't do a lot of work to use WB.
John

Always use the right tool for the job.

We need to clean house.
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#26
  Re: Miniwax Polycrylic by Gibbcutter (For years I stuck by...)
I've a question regarding Minwax Polycrylic for you good knowledgeable folk. First off, I'm just a guy working in his too small garage and often in his driveway with basic tools looking for 'good enough' results, not a professional with the makings of a proper shop and gear needing to turn out high quality pieces to keep the lights on. I'm a function over form type, but I do try to make things nice where possible.

I've built a set of boxes from maple veneer plywood  that will serve as a platform for my mattress and an under bed storage space for blankets and such. I settled on using Polycrylic Clear Satin since it was touted as a great product for giving a clear finish that looked close to raw wood with no discoloration or yellowing. I didn't trust myself not to get brush marks and wiping it on a scrap piece didn't work well either, so I went ahead and purchased an electric sprayer to apply it with (Wagner Control Spray 250 to be exact). First coat went on easy as could be though a little heavy (probably two coats equivalent). The finished texture was a little rough (a combination of raised grain and the nature of spraying). I sanded it back down to smooth with 220 using a vibrating palm sander to cover the big areas then the inside corners and ends by hand. So now it's smooth and the appearance, while slightly dulled (more of a true satin now) from what it was prior to sanding, looks good. The can gives directions for brushing on and says 3 coats, but having sprayed it on I don't know how close I am to that or if more is necessary. 

So my question is how do you know when you have enough of this product on? For sealing and protection purposes. Finish-wise/aesthetically I'm happy with where it's at.
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#27
  Re: RE: Miniwax Polycrylic by DeepBarney (I've a question rega...)
(06-27-2018, 07:08 PM)DeepBarney Wrote: I've a question regarding Minwax Polycrylic for you good knowledgeable folk. First off, I'm just a guy working in his too small garage and often in his driveway with basic tools looking for 'good enough' results, not a professional with the makings of a proper shop and gear needing to turn out high quality pieces to keep the lights on. I'm a function over form type, but I do try to make things nice where possible.

I've built a set of boxes from maple veneer plywood  that will serve as a platform for my mattress and an under bed storage space for blankets and such. I settled on using Polycrylic Clear Satin since it was touted as a great product for giving a clear finish that looked close to raw wood with no discoloration or yellowing. I didn't trust myself not to get brush marks and wiping it on a scrap piece didn't work well either, so I went ahead and purchased an electric sprayer to apply it with (Wagner Control Spray 250 to be exact). First coat went on easy as could be though a little heavy (probably two coats equivalent). The finished texture was a little rough (a combination of raised grain and the nature of spraying). I sanded it back down to smooth with 220 using a vibrating palm sander to cover the big areas then the inside corners and ends by hand. So now it's smooth and the appearance, while slightly dulled (more of a true satin now) from what it was prior to sanding, looks good. The can gives directions for brushing on and says 3 coats, but having sprayed it on I don't know how close I am to that or if more is necessary. 

So my question is how do you know when you have enough of this product on? For sealing and protection purposes. Finish-wise/aesthetically I'm happy with where it's at.

Spray some on a piece of scrap plywood, just like you did on the boxes.  When it's dry sand it the same way you did on the boxes, too, then vacuum off the dust.  Now you have a sample to test.  Put some dye in water (Transtint, or even food coloring, anything to give it some color) and dribble a little on your sample.  Leave it on for a minute or two, then wipe it off.  If the wood is stained you don't have enough finish on it "for sealing and protection purposes".  

John
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#28
  Re: Miniwax Polycrylic by Gibbcutter (For years I stuck by...)
(06-27-2018, 10:33 PM)jteneyck Wrote: Spray some on a piece of scrap plywood, just like you did on the boxes.  When it's dry sand it the same way you did on the boxes, too, then vacuum off the dust.  Now you have a sample to test.  Put some dye in water (Transtint, or even food coloring, anything to give it some color) and dribble a little on your sample.  Leave it on for a minute or two, then wipe it off.  If the wood is stained you don't have enough finish on it "for sealing and protection purposes".  

John
This is just the kind of thing I needed to know, thanks! I already have a scrap piece treated and sanded so I'll use it. Water beads up on the boxes now and wipes off without leaving a wet spot but I didn't know if that alone was indicative of a decent seal. I'll try it with some dye to see what that gets me.
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#29
  Re: RE: Miniwax Polycrylic by jteneyck ([quote='DeepBarney' ...)
(06-27-2018, 10:33 PM)jteneyck Wrote: Spray some on a piece of scrap plywood, just like you did on the boxes.  When it's dry sand it the same way you did on the boxes, too, then vacuum off the dust.  Now you have a sample to test.  Put some dye in water (Transtint, or even food coloring, anything to give it some color) and dribble a little on your sample.  Leave it on for a minute or two, then wipe it off.  If the wood is stained you don't have enough finish on it "for sealing and protection purposes".  

John

Great tip on the dye test.  Never heard that one before.

Thanks
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#30
  Re: RE: Miniwax Polycrylic by Bill Wilson ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(06-28-2018, 07:55 AM)Bill Wilson Wrote: Great tip on the dye test.  Never heard that one before.

Thanks

Sat a coffee cup on a test board once and slopped coffee.  That told me I needed more coats.  And more coffee.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
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