Elm for drawers?
#11
  
I am at the drawer building stage in the construction of an Arts & Crafts quarter sawn white oar armoire. The drawer fronts will be QSWO. I was going to use poplar for the sides and back, butfind that have no poplar on hand. I do however, have some elm. I have never used elm before and wondered if it would be suitable for drawer sides?
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#12
  Re: Elm for drawers? by joemac (I am at the drawer b...)
All I know first hand of elm is it died off when I was a kid in the Midwest US. Dutch Elm disease was attacking west coast elms when I moved to Puget Sound after university. However, have read that it is notorious for moving. 

Jack Plane at Pegs and Tails has a lot of examples of elm. Here's one page: 

 https://pegsandtails.wordpress.com/2017/...-cx-redux/

Another:  https://pegsandtails.wordpress.com/2018/...this-cxix/

My memory tells me that its best use is for well pumps and constant water saturation.
Bruce
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#13
  Re: Elm for drawers? by joemac (I am at the drawer b...)
At least for "red elm," as I believe they call it, it is still available around here.
I would say it's a tad harder than poplar.  The grain is pretty prominent and it can be a little interlocked.
It could work for drawer sides.  I'm not sure if you'd be OK with it visually standing out like it tends to do?
The only other thing is that my unsealed red elm has a distinct smell that lasts a long time.
All that said, it's a neat wood.  I made a few gift boxes with red elm on the sides:

   

Chris
Chris
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#14
  Re: Elm for drawers? by joemac (I am at the drawer b...)
I remember seeing yours some time back, Chris. That's a beautiful box.
Bruce
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#15
  Re: Elm for drawers? by joemac (I am at the drawer b...)
(03-26-2018, 08:27 PM)joemac Wrote: I am at the drawer building stage in the construction of an Arts & Crafts quarter sawn white oar armoire. The drawer fronts will be QSWO. I was going to use poplar for the sides and back, butfind that  have no poplar on hand. I do however, have some elm. I have never used elm before and wondered if it would be suitable for drawer sides?

JOE!!!

Dang, it's great to see another of the "old crowd" here again!
See ya around,
Dominic
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#16
  Re: Elm for drawers? by joemac (I am at the drawer b...)
I use a lot of Elm. Milled from my neighbors trees. Complete beds, chest, trunks, etc. It doesn't smell. I have never had a problem with movement. It's hard and stains well. Easy to work. I can't say anything bad about it.
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#17
  Re: Elm for drawers? by joemac (I am at the drawer b...)
There you go, Joe. The full range of advice. Warps; doesn't. Stinks; doesn't. Hard to work; easy. Flip a coin.
Bruce
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#18
  Re: Elm for drawers? by joemac (I am at the drawer b...)
Well, there is no doubt it can move and warp a lot when drying boards. Once dry I don't think it is too difficult to manage. Elm's most notable characteristic is the interlocking grain which makes it difficult to split and thus ideal for chair seats or similar. Sure you could use it for drawer sides, but the best choice is some quartersawn wood that won't expand in summer and pinch the drawer in its space.

That is a handsome box Chris.
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#19
  Re: Elm for drawers? by joemac (I am at the drawer b...)
Whatever wood you choose, don’t forget about the I D I O T...

Inside of the Drawer is Outside of the Tree
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#20
  Re: RE: Elm for drawers? by David Knight (Whatever wood you ch...)
(04-07-2018, 05:38 PM)David Knight Wrote: Whatever wood you choose, don’t forget about the person...

    Inside of the Drawer is Outside of the Tree

I have been given an elm tree, on the ground, to cut and split for next winters heat. I will enjoy the heat but not the splitting. Even with a log splitter it is stringy and nasty. But it is also some beautiful wood and would make good drawer sides. I don't think from wood expansion or contraction would be much of a problem at least not anymore than any other wood. If you have enough elm and want to use it for drawer, go for it.

I am sorry I meant for a new reply and not to reply to David's reply.
Tom
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