I would like to know about chisels
#11
  
I know there are a lot of different ones and that they all do different things.

So what kinds of chisels are there and what do they do?

Maybe it will help others like me to understand also.
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#12
  Re: I would like to know about chisels by Arlin Eastman (I know there are a l...)
(04-07-2018, 08:41 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: I know there are a lot of different ones and that they all do different things.

So what kinds of chisels are there and what do they do?

Maybe it will help others like me to understand also.

Butt, paring, bench, mortise, and skew, fishtail, swan-neck, corner, chisels.  The last four are very specific speciality designs.

A butt chisel is a short blade and short handled designed for chopping the mortises for butt hinges.  They also work very well for most joinery chopping tasks like dovetails as their short length makes them very controllable when you hold the tip for precise chopping.

A paring chisel is a very long and thin blade chisel that is designed for taking thin paring cuts.

A bench chisel is a compromise between a butt and paring chisel.  Short and stout enough to handle most chopping while being long enough to comfortably pare with two hands.

The bench chisel is the "jack plane" of chisels.  

A mortise chisel has a few different designs that you can find but the bottom line is that it is designed to endure heavy chopping and prying of waste from a mortise.

The other designs: skew, fishtail, swan-neck, and corner chisels are design modifications on other types for very special tasks.

Skew chisels or fishtail chisels, are incredibly helpful for cleaning out the waste from the pin board of a half blind dovetail joint, etc.

I think that just about covers it.
Peter

My "day job"
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#13
  Re: RE: I would like to know about chisels by Peter Tremblay ([quote='Arlin Eastma...)
(04-07-2018, 10:15 PM)Peter Tremblay Wrote: A mortise chisel has a few different designs that you can find but the bottom line is that it is designed to endure heavy chopping and prying of waste from a mortise.

Note that this variation, and the "firmer" chisel have sides square to the face, while other common types have bevel edges to clear obstruction when, for instance, cleaning between dovetails.  I find a firmer adequate for modest mortises, but attempting to pare can leave marks in corners.  

Most important, to me, is to get chisels made in the system of measurement you are using.  Inch (imperial) or metric.  I measure in metric when using the latter, which means having appropriate rules calibrated in both or either.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#14
  Re: I would like to know about chisels by Arlin Eastman (I know there are a l...)
A nice link that might help.
http://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/store...guide.html
Pat
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#15
  Re: I would like to know about chisels by Arlin Eastman (I know there are a l...)
What Peter said. Yes

Also, you should know that some chisel types refer primarily to their intended use, while others refer to construction features.  So a "bevel-edged" chisel has beveled edges; you can get a bench chisel or a paring chisel with or without beveled edges, but dovetail chisels made sold only with bevel-edges.  Tang-chisels and socket-chisels refer to how the handle is attached to the blade.  You'll find bench chisels, dovetail chisels, and even mortise chisels that are made either way. 

Finally, remember that there's really no standard, authoritative catalog of names for different chisels.  What one manufacturer calls a "firmer chisel" another manufacturer might call a "bench chisel," and what one manufacturer calls a "paring chisel" somebody else might call a "dovetail chisel."  (Well, with the exception of mortise chisels, which pretty much everybody agrees on.)  So don't get too hung up on the nomenclature; just look at the features of the tool.

Oh, and don't forget about Japanese chisels... Winkgrin
Steve S.
------------------------------------------------------
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Tutorials and Build-Alongs at The Literary Workshop
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#16
  Re: I would like to know about chisels by Arlin Eastman (I know there are a l...)
I seen some japaneese chisels and a set goes upwords of $1500 to $4200.   I seen where the middles of the backs are hollowed out, but why so much?

OK so the question is

If a person was limited to say two types of chisels what should he have?

A example is I want to cut out dovetails and need to clean them up.  Then say another is someone wants to also make or clean up mortise and also making box joints with a chisels only.  What is needed with just two sets?
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#17
  Re: RE: I would like to know about chisels by Arlin Eastman (I seen some japanees...)
(04-09-2018, 10:32 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: I seen some japaneese chisels and a set goes upwords of $1500 to $4200.   I seen where the middles of the backs are hollowed out, but why so much?

OK so the question is

If a person was limited to say two types of chisels what should he have?

A example is I want to cut out dovetails and need to clean them up.  Then say another is someone wants to also make or clean up mortise and also making box joints with a chisels only.  What is needed with just two sets?
I don't think sets of chisels are really important.

If I had to do it all over again I think I'd get 1 or 2 sizes of each type that I wanted or used most.

Butt chisels: 1/4 and 3/8
Bench: 1/8, 3/8, or 1/2 and maybe 3/4
Paring: a small and medium... 1/4 and 1/2 or something like that.
Mortise: I'd start with a 1/4 and then maybe a 3/8

But I haven't chopped a mortise with a mortise chisel in years.  Now I tend to drill out most of the waste (brace and bit or drill press) and then clean it up with a bench chisel.
Peter

My "day job"
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#18
  Re: RE: I would like to know about chisels by Arlin Eastman (I seen some japanees...)
(04-09-2018, 10:32 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: I seen some japaneese chisels and a set goes upwords of $1500 to $4200.   I seen where the middles of the backs are hollowed out, but why so much?

OK so the question is

If a person was limited to say two types of chisels what should he have?

A example is I want to cut out dovetails and need to clean them up.  Then say another is someone wants to also make or clean up mortise and also making box joints with a chisels only.  What is needed with just two sets?

Firmer set and a bevel-edge paring set.  The square sides on the former will follow the saw kerfs or sequential bores (mortise) with less twisting than bevel chisels, while the latter will slide into the undercuts for dovetails, as well as do miscellaneous paring.  

Once again, if you're an imperial measure type, buy imperial.  If a metric type, buy metric.  Mixing makes messy mortises....

As to the backs of Japanese chisels, I'd say mostly tradition. It does make lapping for a flat back faster, since less metal is removed, but with modern paper or stones, not really required.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#19
  Re: I would like to know about chisels by Arlin Eastman (I know there are a l...)
So overall chisels that are needed are


1.  Butt/Bench Chisels from 1/8, 1/4, 3/8, 1/2 and 3/4 are best then

2.  Paring Chisels  1/4 and 1/2 and if doing mortises

3.  1/4 and 3/8

All of this makes sense.

Now are any of these socket chisels and are socket chisels more preferred than others
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#20
  Re: RE: I would like to know about chisels by Arlin Eastman (So overall chisels t...)
(04-10-2018, 01:53 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: So overall chisels that are needed are


1.  Butt/Bench Chisels from 1/8, 1/4, 3/8, 1/2 and 3/4 are best then

2.  Paring Chisels  1/4 and 1/2 and if doing mortises

3.  1/4 and 3/8

All of this makes sense.

Now are any of these socket chisels and are socket chisels more preferred than others
I don't think those all are needed.

I think only a few sizes are needed in each category.  That depends on the preference of the woodworker.

I personally love a 3/8" wide chisel.  My favorite is a 3/8" butt chisel.

A buddy loves a 1/2" wide chisel.  His favorite is a bench chisel.

Some of my chisels are socket chisels.

Frankly if you are buying older tools sockets are preferred.
If you are buying new the design of the chisels on the market today are so solid that I don't give it any thought of how the blade and handle meet.  

My $0.02
Peter

My "day job"
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