#5 1/2 plane
#31
  Re: RE: #5 1/2 plane by David Charlesworth (I have always had sm...)
(04-14-2018, 09:48 AM)David Charlesworth Wrote: I have always had small machinery and did almost all my work over 40 years with a 5 1/2.
When I started My teacher bought me a 7, 5 1/2 and 4 1/2.
The 7 and 4 1/2, 1970's UK Stanley, were so badly made that they would not work at all.
I tuned up the 5 1/2 after a couple of years and it has performed magnificently.  Hock blade of course!
5 1/2 & 7 are probably the most useful planes in my opinion.
Best wishes'
David Charlesworth

David - My gravitation toward bigger and wider planes was from an article you had written when you stated you used your 5-1/2 much like a smoother, IIRC.  Great to see you're still here.
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#32
  Re: RE: #5 1/2 plane by bandit571 ([quote='Derek Cohen'...)
(04-15-2018, 12:39 AM)bandit571 Wrote:  Stanley  #3 and the Stanley #5-1/4 shared the same width irons.   1-3/4" wide.    By the time one "dubs" the corners on a 2" wide iron, it would be down to 1-7/8" of USABLE width.    A Stanley #4 and a Stanley #5 shared the 2" wide irons.   Stanley 5-1/2 planes started out using 2-1/4" wide irons ( as did Union 5-A planes) before they were made using the 2-3/8" wide irons.    Stanley only had to make a few sizes, so doing away with the 2-1/4" wide made sense to them.  

Have had a #3 smooth plane, with a 50 degree frog...even sharp, it was a bear to push along...finally sold the thing.

For my  shop...switching irons is way over-rated...I switch planes, instead..  Less hassle, less time resetting a plane....just grab another out of the til.

The more that I use hand tools (I'm well over 10 years) the more that I feel like I have a "tool personality"

I like long saws.  I use the longest saw that will reasonably work for the job.

I like small planes.  I use the smallest plane that will reasonable work for the job.

I like short chisels.  I use the... you get the point.   Rolleyes

When it comes to planes my favorite is a jack.  For my current jack (a Veritas bevel up) I have at least 6 blades.  I have three different grind angles, different cambers, different alloys (O1, A2, M2, PM-V11)

With a bevel down plane I think I'll probably only have 2 or maybe 3.  

I'd love to find a source for a D2 blade or a source for a custom powdered metal blade.  I'd also love to find a toothed blade.

Any thoughts?
Peter

My "day job"
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#33
  Re: #5 1/2 plane by Peter Tremblay (Hello all, I'm cu...)
(04-09-2018, 01:59 PM)Peter Tremblay Wrote: Hello all,

I'm curious about the #5 1/2.

Anyone have one?  

What are your thoughts about the blade width?

If I were to make my own bevel down jack plane (14"-15" sole) what would you recommend in the width of the iron, 1 7/8" or 2 3/8"?

If those were the options what would you recommend?

Somewhat tangential to your question
My 605 1/2 (Type 7?) has a 2 1/4" blade- works well for me.
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#34
  Re: RE: #5 1/2 plane by Peter Tremblay ([quote='bandit571' p...)
(04-15-2018, 11:02 PM)Peter Tremblay Wrote: I'd love to find a source for a D2 blade or a source for a custom powdered metal blade.  I'd also love to find a toothed blade.

Any thoughts?

Hi Peter

Why do you want D2?

As it happens, PM-V11 is in the same family ... only much more refined. You are better off with that.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#35
  Re: #5 1/2 plane by Peter Tremblay (Hello all, I'm cu...)
Peter

I have the 5 1/2 and it is harder to push unless it is skewed which I do.  With the wide blade I can cover more serface or even a 2" board and still skew it.

I only use that if I can not use my block plane that Rob Lee gave me way back when and I bought the handle for it and it is fantastic and even my wife uses it to shim the top or side of the door when it got tight. Yes
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#36
  Re: RE: #5 1/2 plane by Derek Cohen ([quote='Peter Trembl...)
(04-16-2018, 03:43 AM)Derek Cohen Wrote: Hi Peter

Why do you want D2?

As it happens, PM-V11 is in the same family ... only much more refined. You are better off with that.

Regards from Perth

Derek

I have a D2 iron for my small infill plane that I made years ago and I love it.

It does not hold a keen edge for longer than a moment but then the "just less  than keen/sharpe enough" edge lasts a long time and never chips.

That's why I like D2.

I'd love a PM-V11 blade but I don't know where I could order them to my specifications.

Right now I have 5 blades 3/16" thick, 1 7/8" wide, and 7 1/2" long.  All in O1
I just ordered an A2 2 3/8" thick blade from Lee Valley during their free shipping.

The blades are going into 4 smoothers, 1 jack, and one jointer (the 2 3/8" blade)
Peter

My "day job"
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#37
  Re: RE: #5 1/2 plane by Arlin Eastman (Peter I have the ...)
(04-16-2018, 06:46 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: Peter

I have the 5 1/2 and it is harder to push unless it is skewed which I do.  With the wide blade I can cover more serface or even a 2" board and still skew it.

I only use that if I can not use my block plane that Rob Lee gave me way back when and I bought the handle for it and it is fantastic and even my wife uses it to shim the top or side of the door when it got tight. Yes

Thanks,

I think that since I'm making a jointer I'll have a wide plane for jointing and flattening a panel.

So I'm going to build my jack for a more traditional role of heavy stock removal.
But I will probably have two or three blades for the Jack: heavy cambered, square honed for shooting, and I'd love to get a toothed blade for the jack.  I really like a toothed blade for heavy stock removal and tough grain prep without tear out.
Peter

My "day job"
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#38
  Re: #5 1/2 plane by Peter Tremblay (Hello all, I'm cu...)
I had a 5 1/2 and it just seemed too bulky for me. I also had a 4 1/2 that I did not like. I have a #6 that is used on the shooting board. My #5 and #7 are used for 95% of the work.
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#39
  Re: RE: #5 1/2 plane by Arlin Eastman (Peter I have the ...)
(04-16-2018, 06:46 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: Peter

I have the 5 1/2 and it is harder to push unless it is skewed which I do.  With the wide blade I can cover more serface or even a 2" board and still skew it.

I only use that if I can not use my block plane that Rob Lee gave me way back when and I bought the handle for it and it is fantastic and even my wife uses it to shim the top or side of the door when it got tight. Yes
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"I have the 5 1/2 and it is harder to push unless it is skewed which I do. With the wide blade I can cover more serface or even a 2" board and still skew it."

I "skew" almost every plane I own, because it is easier to "slice cut" than "push cut"..As you get older, that makes a huge difference in the amount of effort it takes.

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#40
  Re: #5 1/2 plane by Peter Tremblay (Hello all, I'm cu...)
I have always preferred 1/2 size planes over their smaller counterparts. I almost never use a size 4 or 5 plane. I own older and well tuned Stanley’s in these sizes but my 1/2 sizes are premium planes.

As far as hard to push....that’s relative. Of course a sharp iron is the most important factor aside from the physical ability and skill it takes. Paraffin wax on the sole is a must as well. That said, I own an 8 but not a 7. Give me 20 years and maybe my opinions will change.


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