Apothecary chest
#81
  Re: Apothecary chest by Derek Cohen (Lynndy and I were in...)
This is just a taste of what I will be doing for a few more weekends.

A bench shot for those that like to see how others work ...




Below I have a few shots of the dovetailing (again). These are more to show specific strategies used, rather than dovetailing as a procedure.

The drawer fronts are moved a couple of mm past the front of the drawer blades, and marked all round ...







In an early post I showed how a bevel was formed on the drawer front to create a square junction with the drawer side. The bevel is seen below the blue tape ...




The ends of the drawer front angle, and it is not possible to use a jig to align it with a side. I never do this anyway, and simply use a wide chisel ...




It's a bit of a balancing act, but the blue tape acts like a non slip, and the knife only has to make one cutting stroke to sever the layer of tape. This reduces the chance of movement and error ...




The kerfs are sawn, and then deepened with a kerfing chisel. Note that the ends of the board are supported by a clamp to prevent splitting ...




Rather than chop out the waste, I used a trim router to remove move of it. This saved a lot of time ...







When removing the remaining waste, I found that the thinner blades of the Blue Spruce "dovetail" chisels worked best to pare away thin slices to the line..




The Blue Spruce fishtail chisel is my favourite for clearing the corners of sockets ...




The completed socket ..




I counted on the parts going together off the saw, that is, no fine tuning for a fit. There is just not enough time for correcting the fit. This was the last drawer for the weekend. Much the same as the others. Just pushed together - no clean up ...




This was the first row, shown here to get a better view of the design ...




This is two rows - of drawers dovetailed on one corner only. And these twelve required an average of 1 hour each to complete ...




The next weekend should see the remaining drawers complete this dovetailed end. I am hoping that I shall find a way to speed the time taken for dovetailing, but I am estimating that it will require a further 3 weekends to complete the drawers.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#82
  Re: Apothecary chest by Derek Cohen (Lynndy and I were in...)
Wow! You are brave, Derek. Free-handing the tailed router. I lost the tip of a finger to one; I was faster 35 years ago, or I'd be a stubby, like Hack. But I still consider a router a free-hand design tool.

Kerfing chisel?
Bruce
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#83
  Re: Apothecary chest by Derek Cohen (Lynndy and I were in...)
Quote:kerfing chisel?

Bruce, go here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMadeToo...hisel.html
Do you think I should market them? Smile
Regards from Perth
Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#84
  Re: Apothecary chest by Derek Cohen (Lynndy and I were in...)
Derek,

That is turning out great!  

How do you like the Blue Spruce Chisels?

John
Formerly known as John's Woodshop
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#85
  Re: RE: Apothecary chest by Belle City Woodworking (Derek, That is tu...)
(06-19-2018, 04:20 PM)mBelle City Woodworking Wrote: Derek,

That is turning out great!  

How do you like the Blue Spruce Chisels?

John

John, they are very nice chisels for paring small work. I think of them as detail chisels. The balance is the best - thin blades and great handles. The A2 steel needs a 30 degree bevel - I would prefer O1 and 25 degrees - but they take a good edge. The edge is lost quicker with chopping, so I do not use them for that. This means they are not preferred as general bench chisels. I've had mine ever since they began being produced (indeed, the 3/4", the largest size I have, was the first made), so tha must be about 10 years now?

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#86
  Re: RE: Apothecary chest by Derek Cohen ([quote] kerfing chi...)
(06-19-2018, 01:16 PM)Derek Cohen Wrote: Bruce, go here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMadeToo...hisel.html
Do you think I should market them? Smile
Regards from Perth
Derek

I have done that with scrapers in soft wood. Walnut is not usually tough. But, I would think there is failure in your hard local species?

Yeah! Send it to Vesper.
Bruce
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#87
  Re: RE: Apothecary chest by Derek Cohen ([quote='mBelle City ...)
(06-19-2018, 07:44 PM)Derek Cohen Wrote: John, they are very nice chisels for paring small work. I think of them as detail chisels. The balance is the best - thin blades and great handles. The A2 steel needs a 30 degree bevel - I would prefer O1 and 25 degrees - but they take a good edge. The edge is lost quicker with chopping, so I do not use them for that. This means they are not preferred as general bench chisels. I've had mine ever since they began being produced (indeed, the 3/4", the largest size I have, was the first made), so tha must be about 10 years now?

Regards from Perth

Derek

Thanks for that info Derek!

All the best!
john
Formerly known as John's Woodshop
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#88
  Re: Apothecary chest by Derek Cohen (Lynndy and I were in...)
Derek,

I've watched your build-alongs for some years now and have read most of the content on your blog.

Each of your projects is seemingly more challenging than its predecessor, which Leads me to ask if you would consider explaining WHY? Because you can or because you like it are valid but entirely insufficient answers. I am hoping you will accept the challenge and that we will soon see a remarkable treatise that will fuel imaginations and discussion.
Thanks,  Curt
-----------------
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards."
      -- Soren Kierkegaard
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#89
  Re: Apothecary chest by Derek Cohen (Lynndy and I were in...)
I have really enjoyed this so far. Can't wait to see the finished project! The wife said it would make a great fly tying materials chest.  Big Grin

(I have been threatening to build a six foot tall lingerie chest to match her oak tying desk... )
Jim in Virginia
You can tell a lot about the character of a man -
By the way he treats those who can do nothing for him.
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#90
  Re: RE: Apothecary chest by cputnam (Derek, I've watch...)
(06-21-2018, 07:06 PM)cputnam Wrote: Derek,

I've watched your build-alongs for some years now and have read most of the content on your blog.

Each of your projects is seemingly more challenging than its predecessor, which Leads me to ask if you would consider explaining WHY?  Because you can or because you like it are valid but entirely insufficient answers.  I am hoping you will accept the challenge and that we will soon see a remarkable treatise that will fuel imaginations and discussion.

Hi Curt

It's not really that complicated - unlike the pieces I build Smile

One part if it is that I like the challenge. The challenge is not just to push the envelope in regard to the complexity of joinery, but also the need to sustain a focus over time. I consider the latter aspect - sustaining focus over time - to be a big part of why most weekend warriors (such as myself) tend to limit the complexity of their projects. 

The other part is my undoing. I design my pieces, and I do so without consideration to their construction. That comes later. I must then wear the consequences, which is what I am doing now!  Smile

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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