Narrow dovetails question
#11
  
This question is for pure choppers, not copers. I asked it a long time ago, not sure I ever got an answer I could relate to.

When I cut and chop a narrow tail, especially in thick wood, the final chopped-out piece tends to get jammed up into the narrow end. It doesn't help that I use Japanese saws, which don't leave much escape room. I spend way too much time trying to dislodge the last chunk. I never hear anyone talk about this, so it must be me. How do you avoid this problem?
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
Reply
#12
  Re: Narrow dovetails question by Aram (This question is for...)
(04-29-2018, 08:41 PM)Aram Wrote: This question is for pure choppers, not copers. I asked it a long time ago, not sure I ever got an answer I could relate to.

When I cut and chop a narrow tail, especially in thick wood, the final chopped-out piece tends to get jammed up into the narrow end. It doesn't help that I use Japanese saws, which don't leave much escape room. I spend way too much time trying to dislodge the last chuck. I never hear anyone talk about this, so it must be me. How do you avoid this problem?

These days I do more coping.   However it was a "near jam" situation from time to time when I chopped only.  I'm guessing I got by because I was using a push-saw with about 0.020" or greater kerf.
Chris
Reply
#13
  Re: Narrow dovetails question by Aram (This question is for...)
How narrow is narrow? Have you tried cutting the waste in half? The same saw gap, instead of sawing at your angle to the sides of the tails, saw straight down to your line (or just above) to split the waste in half. Should come out more easily.
Reply
#14
  Re: RE: Narrow dovetails question by JQuacker (How narrow is narrow...)
(04-30-2018, 09:20 AM)JQuacker Wrote: How narrow is narrow? Have you tried cutting the waste in half? The same saw gap, instead of sawing at your angle to the sides of the tails, saw straight down to your line (or just above) to split the waste in half. Should come out more easily.

+1, but I use a western saw. It doesn't take much to jamb the waste, and I shy away from skinny pins. I have been tempted to use a drill, like for mortises.
Bruce
Reply
#15
  Re: RE: Narrow dovetails question by hbmcc ([quote='JQuacker' pi...)
(04-30-2018, 09:20 AM)JQuacker Wrote: How narrow is narrow? Have you tried cutting the waste in half? The same saw gap, instead of sawing at your angle to the sides of the tails, saw straight down to your line (or just above) to split the waste in half. Should come out more easily.

(04-30-2018, 11:31 AM)hbmcc Wrote: +1, but I use a western saw. It doesn't take much to jamb the waste, and I shy away from skinny pins. I have been tempted to use a drill, like for mortises.

Thanks. I'll probably try a saw kerf and drilling. Might end up coping. I've done it before, just not my favorite way.
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
Reply
#16
  Re: Narrow dovetails question by Aram (This question is for...)
(04-29-2018, 08:41 PM)Aram Wrote: This question is for pure choppers, not copers. I asked it a long time ago, not sure I ever got an answer I could relate to.

When I cut and chop a narrow tail, especially in thick wood, the final chopped-out piece tends to get jammed up into the narrow end. It doesn't help that I use Japanese saws, which don't leave much escape room. I spend way too much time trying to dislodge the last chunk. I never hear anyone talk about this, so it must be me. How do you avoid this problem?

I'm typically a coper/fretsaw-er, but on really narrow pins, I don't bother. Instead, I saw a kerf about halfway down into the waste after cutting the tail angles. In most cases the pointy bits of the waste break off during chopping/don't get stuck. (But I just usually cut larger dovetails Smile )
Reply
#17
  Re: RE: Narrow dovetails question by elinourrumming ([quote='Aram' pid='7...)
(05-01-2018, 08:49 AM)elinourrumming Wrote: I'm typically a coper/fretsaw-er, but on really narrow pins, I don't bother. Instead, I saw a kerf about halfway down into the waste after cutting the tail angles. In most cases the pointy bits of the waste break off during chopping/don't get stuck. (But I just usually cut larger dovetails Smile )

Thanks, Megan. I'll try it.
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
Reply
#18
  Re: Narrow dovetails question by Aram (This question is for...)
(05-01-2018, 08:49 AM)elinourrumming Wrote: I'm typically a coper/fretsaw-er, but on really narrow pins, I don't bother. Instead, I saw a kerf about halfway down into the waste after cutting the tail angles. In most cases the pointy bits of the waste break off during chopping/don't get stuck. (But I just usually cut larger dovetails Smile )

That's a great tip, Megan!  I'll have to try that next time I cut dovetails.

I usually cope out the waste, unless it's only a little bit in softwood, but sometimes chopping really is faster.
Steve S.
------------------------------------------------------
Tradition cannot be inherited, and if you want it you must obtain it by great labour.
- T. S. Eliot

Tutorials and Build-Alongs at The Literary Workshop
Reply
#19
  Re: RE: Narrow dovetails question by hbmcc ([quote='JQuacker' pi...)
Aram, for those really narrow tails you can do the vertical relief cut but I prefer to saw out the wast. A jewelers and scroll saw blade is better than a coping saw.

If not, you risk bruising or, in the case of a soft wood, denting or even breaking out the tip of the tail as the wast becomes wedged in the final few chops.
Everything is a prototype so its a one of a kind.
Reply
#20
  Re: Narrow dovetails question by Aram (This question is for...)
By the way, good to hear from Megan.


Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)