Another BU plane tear-out question
#11
  
I thought I had everything tuned in with my LV BU planes but now getting tear out on QSWO boards but only the ones with no rays visible. Tear out gets out of control where QS is transitioning to smaller radius grain. My blade is ground at 38d primary with a small micro bevel. Mouth closed up as small as possible. Blade is A2 and hair cut sharp. Curiously, almost zero tear out on figured boards. Do I use a higher angle microbevel? Or that become a problem on BU planes? I should add that also get same tear out with LV #5 bench plane.
Thanks in advance for your help.
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#12
  Re: Another BU plane tear-out question by aruuk (I thought I had ever...)
I'll be interested in what others say, too!

I have some QS red-oak which tears out even with an HNT Gordon 55-degree plane.   I've had to scrape that wood... or just sand it....   Other pretty oak I have, is much easier.  Not much rhyme or reason to it.

Chris
Chris
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#13
  Re: Another BU plane tear-out question by aruuk (I thought I had ever...)
Some boards are just ornery. Use a scraper, or try a higher angle BD plane.
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#14
  Re: RE: Another BU plane tear-out question by Hank Knight (Some boards are just...)
(07-02-2018, 02:28 PM)Hank Knight Wrote: Some boards are just ornery. Use a scraper, or try a higher angle BD plane.

Even Krenov said you can't (and shouldn't) plane every board.

Cabinet scrapers are wonderful things.
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
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#15
  Re: RE: Another BU plane tear-out question by Aram ([quote='Hank Knight'...)
(07-02-2018, 02:59 PM)Aram Wrote: Even Krenov said you can't (and shouldn't) plane every board.

Cabinet scrapers are wonderful things.

I have planed every board since 1976. I use a double iron plane. With a double iron you can learn to plane quartersawn oak.
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#16
  Re: RE: Another BU plane tear-out question by wmickley ([quote='Aram' pid='7...)
(07-02-2018, 03:52 PM)wmickley Wrote: I have planed every board since 1976. I use a double iron plane. With a double iron you can learn to plane quartersawn oak.

OK, I'm googling double iron planes, but did you have any brand in mind? Thanks
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#17
  Re: Another BU plane tear-out question by aruuk (I thought I had ever...)
I would bet you have a board or 3 with reversing grain. Try planing across the spots with the tear out. You may have to experiment with a few different approach angles to find the sweet spot.
Blackhat
Common decency is as rare as common sense. I figure there was only a finite amount of both made and its getting shared out among too many folks.


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#18
  Re: RE: Another BU plane tear-out question by aruuk ([quote='wmickley' pi...)
(07-02-2018, 06:08 PM)aruuk Wrote: OK, I'm googling double iron planes, but did you have any brand in mind? Thanks

I have been using Vintage Stanleys, and Millers Falls planes.....the "double iron" just means there is a chipbreaker added to the bevel DOWN iron.   Set within 1mm from the edge, the chipbreaker helps reduce tear outs.    BU planes have no such thing....and add like an over-sized block plane.
Show me a picture, I'll build a project from that
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#19
  Re: RE: Another BU plane tear-out question by aruuk ([quote='wmickley' pi...)
(07-02-2018, 06:08 PM)aruuk Wrote: OK, I'm googling double iron planes, but did you have any brand in mind? Thanks

For some woods, white oak among them, quartersawn material is difficult to plane. The timber is so eager to be riven in this plane that it will split out ahead of the cut. When I mentioned this before on a forum, some fellow posted a picture of oak and said he had no trouble. However his piece was cut about five degrees from quartersawn. The trouble arises only on boards that are really well aligned with the rays or only on that portion of the board that is well aligned.

Aruuk, your #5 bench plane is probably a double iron plane. For this situation have the iron a sharp as you can, take a very light cut, and put the cap iron up close to the edge. If you still get tear out, the cap iron is too far away.
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#20
  Re: Another BU plane tear-out question by aruuk (I thought I had ever...)
(07-02-2018, 12:53 PM)aruuk Wrote: I thought I had everything tuned in with my LV BU planes but now getting tear out on QSWO boards but only the ones with no rays visible. Tear out gets out of control where QS is transitioning to smaller radius grain. My blade is ground at 38d primary with a small micro bevel. Mouth closed up as small as possible. Blade is A2 and hair cut sharp. Curiously, almost zero tear out on figured boards. Do I use a higher angle microbevel? Or that become a problem on BU planes? I should add that also get same tear out with LV #5 bench plane.
Thanks in advance for your help.

Aruuk, the solution for your BU plane is simply to increase the secondary bevel to 50 degrees for a 62 degree cutting angle. You will then plane without tearout.

Incidentally, the mouth size will be irrelevant when set up that way.

For the #5, which is a BD plane, as mentioned by Warren, set the chipbreaker as close as possible to the edge of the blade. You are looking at around 0.3 to 0.4mm (not the 1mm mentioned by Steven, which would be too far back).

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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