Another BU plane tear-out question
#21
  Re: Another BU plane tear-out question by aruuk (I thought I had ever...)
A double iron plane is a standard bench plane with a chipbreaker (iron # 1 is the blade and iron #2 is your chip breaker).  The chipbreaker must meet the blade at around an 80 deg angle (like the Stanley chip breakers).  The Lie Nielsen chip breaker does not do this, but it can be modified.

It's possible to increase the bevel angle with a micro bevel and get some relief on your tear out, but that will also make it more difficult to push.  You can try going to 55 deg total angle (add 5 more deg to the 38 deg bevel on your blade).  I've seen some planes that have a 60 deg total angle, but at that point, a scraper is more useful.

Make sure you are taking very thin shavings.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#22
  Re: RE: Another BU plane tear-out question by AHill (A double iron plane ...)
(07-03-2018, 10:48 AM)AHill Wrote: A double iron plane is a standard bench plane with a chipbreaker (iron # 1 is the blade and iron #2 is your chip breaker).  The chipbreaker must meet the blade at around an 80 deg angle (like the Stanley chip breakers).  The Lie Nielsen chip breaker does not do this, but it can be modified.

It's possible to increase the bevel angle with a micro bevel and get some relief on your tear out, but that will also make it more difficult to push.  You can try going to 55 deg total angle (add 5 more deg to the 38 deg bevel on your blade).  I've seen some planes that have a 60 deg total angle, but at that point, a scraper is more useful.

Make sure you are taking very thin shavings.

Hi Allan

I think that you will find a 62 degree cutting angle on a BU plane is fairly easy to push. The low centre of effort plus thin shavings are responsible. I most certainly would not feel the need to stop at 55 degrees and then resort to a scraper. 

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#23
  Re: Another BU plane tear-out question by aruuk (I thought I had ever...)
Thank you all for the tips. All those voting for ornery/reversing grain were spot on. Also thanks to Derek, 62 d cutting angle is not that hard to push and solves the problem.
Woodnet rules!
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#24
  Re: Another BU plane tear-out question by aruuk (I thought I had ever...)
Do you guys think a #12 or #112 scrapper would work good for this?
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#25
  Re: RE: Another BU plane tear-out question by Arlin Eastman (Do you guys think a ...)
(07-10-2018, 05:05 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: Do you guys think a #12 or #112 scrapper would work good for this?

Arlin,

I've found curly maple to be difficult to plane. Occasionally, I find that my 112 works better than any of my planes on this stuff.


IMG_1556 by Hank Knight, on Flickr

Hank
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#26
  Re: Another BU plane tear-out question by aruuk (I thought I had ever...)
Thanks Hank.  By the way that is a sharp looking scrapper there.  Is it an old Stanley or new LV?

Last.  I finally have a #12 and needs work on it, but how do you sharpen the blade?  Just like anyother one where you bend over the tip with a burr?
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#27
  Re: RE: Another BU plane tear-out question by Arlin Eastman (Thanks Hank.  By the...)
(07-11-2018, 09:51 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: Thanks Hank.  By the way that is a sharp looking scrapper there.  Is it an old Stanley or new LV?

Last.  I finally have a #12 and needs work on it, but how do you sharpen the blade?  Just like anyother one where you bend over the tip with a burr?

Hi, Arlin.

Thanks for the compliment. The scraper plane is a Lie-Nielsen. I sharpen there blade with a basic 45 degree bevel and flatten and polish the back. I polish the bevel to 8,000 grit and turn a very slight burr. It's a little fiddly to set up, but when it's right, it's fun to see those fluffy curls. I have a Norris A5 that is my best smoother. There is very little it won't handle, but for those rare pieces, the scraper plane is the answer.


IMG_1294 by Hank Knight, on Flickr
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#28
  Re: RE: Another BU plane tear-out question by Hank Knight ([quote='Arlin Eastma...)
Hank,  slight hijack,  but can you post another photo of your plane?  I own a few Norrises, and have seen a bunch, but don't think I have ever seen one with that color of infill.  BTW,  like you I agree that a Norris, and a Spiers, can do wonders on reversing and other challenging grain.
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#29
  Re: RE: Another BU plane tear-out question by barryvabeach (Hank,  slight hijack...)
(07-12-2018, 08:11 PM)barryvabeach Wrote: Hank,  slight hijack,  but can you post another photo of your plane?  I own a few Norrises, and have seen a bunch, but don't think I have ever seen one with that color of infill.  BTW,  like you I agree that a Norris, and a Spiers, can do wonders on reversing and other challenging grain.

Barry,

My Norris is nothing special. It is a post war A5 my daughter found own Portobello Road in London and gave to me for Christmas years ago. It is one of the common ones that had the black or dark mahogany varnish on the tote and infill. Before I knew any better, I stripped it and refinished the wood. It's my user, so I don't think I committed an unforgivable sin by refinishing it. Besides, I like it better without the ugly black finish. The tote and bun are birch and some of the infill is walnut. I think this was common in the day.


fullsizeoutput_2fc by Hank Knight, on Flickr

Hank
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#30
  Re: RE: Another BU plane tear-out question by Hank Knight ([quote='barryvabeach...)
Hank,  you did a nice job refinishing.  I have a post war, and it has a fair amount of crazing to the finish.  I have a few prewar Norrises, and Spiers, and not sure about the wood choice, but they are very dark.
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