Shed Project: Framing
#21
  Re: RE: Shed Project: Framing by jteneyck ([quote='cndamm' pid=...)
(07-09-2018, 09:58 PM)jteneyck Wrote: You guys might want to read this:  Simpson Framing Screws

John


Looks new. Cool

Have you purposely tried to break one yet, by bending with a hammer.
I'm curious. Winkgrin
Steve





 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020

 When I use the toilet it smells just like fresh brewed coffee!
fredp 02/13/2020







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#22
  Re: Shed Project: Framing by jteneyck (Here's a link to the...)
Nice shed.

I'm not a screw guy either. Good coated sinkers and a lot of them.

I'd be more inclined to use screws if they didn't put the bugle heads on the ends. I like the design of it other than the head. Any screw will countersink enough in framing lumber. They should a flatte head or a much less pronounced bugle shape. I understand that they'd be weaker but there's got to be a better compromise. Make the head more like a Kreg screw but wider head, flatter if possible. Bugle heads sink into wood and loosen the joint. Imho nails are a tighter joint. I think they tend to split wood.
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#23
  Re: Shed Project: Framing by jteneyck (Here's a link to the...)
Is that a drain tile or gutter drain in the gravel?

Aside from my screw remarks, it really does look like a nice shed.
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#24
  Re: RE: Shed Project: Framing by Snipe Hunter (Is that a drain tile...)
(07-09-2018, 10:24 PM)Snipe Hunter Wrote: Is that a drain tile or gutter drain in the gravel?

Aside from my screw remarks, it really does look like a nice shed.

Yes, those are drains for gutter downspouts.  If you go back to my first post you can see the drainage system I installed.  

Anyway, as far as screws go, here's a link to another Simpson Strong-Tie page showing where their fastening screws can be used, which is pretty much everywhere.  Link
 
John
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#25
  Re: Shed Project: Framing by jteneyck (Here's a link to the...)
I like the proportions with the reduced height.
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#26
  Re: Shed Project: Framing by jteneyck (Here's a link to the...)
That was going to look funny at the original height, good decision to cut it down.  I had to rework my walls because I read the instructions for the siding and my 24" spacing wasn't going to work.  That was a bit of an annoying setback, but it didn't take long.

my shed has walls that are less than 8' so I could meet the township zoning requirement that the overall height be under 10'.  I was worried that it would look short, but it doesn't.  Wouldn't mind having a bit more height than 10' so the roof wasn't quite so flat, but the angle is okay.
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#27
  Re: RE: Shed Project: Framing by Stwood_ ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(07-09-2018, 10:18 PM)Stwood_ Wrote: Looks new. Cool

Have you purposely tried to break one yet, by bending with a hammer.
I'm curious. Winkgrin

Construction screws don't break easily when bent, but a shearing load is different than a bending load.  Look at Simpson's info.  Fastening screws meet code and can be used most everywhere nails can.  The fact that they aren't is about speed, cost, and old habits.  But just the other night I was watching a repeat episode of TOH and saw Tommy install steel angle iron into a LVL beam - using screws.  Those angle iron were going to carry the load of a poured concrete pad for a wood stove to sit on.  

John
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#28
  Re: RE: Shed Project: Framing by jteneyck ([quote='Stwood_' pid...)
(07-09-2018, 11:08 PM)jteneyck Wrote: Construction screws don't break easily when bent, but a shearing load is different than a bending load.  Look at Simpson's info.  Fastening screws meet code and can be used most everywhere nails can.  The fact that they aren't is about speed, cost, and old habits.  But just the other night I was watching a repeat episode of TOH and saw Tommy install steel angle iron into a LVL beam - using screws.  Those angle iron were going to carry the load of a poured concrete pad for a wood stove to sit on.  

John

I understand that. But it has to start a bend, to break. Have you bent one? Are the simpson's the screws you are using?

Steel to wood, yes most would expect screws or lags.
Steve





 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020

 When I use the toilet it smells just like fresh brewed coffee!
fredp 02/13/2020







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#29
  Re: Shed Project: Framing by jteneyck (Here's a link to the...)
Being an former nail pounder, from way back in the day, I have a built in bias in the nails vs screws debate.  Big Grin

However, I have watched shows like the Treehouse guys and even Mike Holmes where they use a lot of screws for general construction, where nails were traditionally used.  I have no idea what kind of screws or what the codes are in the areas they were working, but I did find it curious.  I too had always understood that generally speaking, construction screws do not have the necessary shear strength compared to nails.  As for ease of disassembly, I have an arsenal of crowbars, nail pullers & cats paws in various sizes, that I've accumulated over the years.  In fact I picked up one of these beauties a couple weeks ago at a flea market.

[Image: Vintage-Tool-Bridgeport-Hardware-No-20-Cast-Iron.jpg]

I probably will never have much occasion to use it, but I used one a good bit, 40 years ago and when I saw it, I couldn't resist.  Laugh
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#30
  Re: RE: Shed Project: Framing by Stwood_ ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(07-09-2018, 10:18 PM)Stwood_ Wrote: Looks new. Cool

Have you purposely tried to break one yet, by bending with a hammer.
I'm curious. Winkgrin

Screws have always outperformed nails in tensile (pull out strength).  I is in shear strength where the nails have proven far superior.  And for framing, shear strength is primary.

When choosing nails always choose "hot dipped" over "cold galvanized".  The cold galvanized coating will flake off from impact.  So the very act of striking it with a hammer compromises the finish.

Of course if it is protected from moisture that might be a moot point.  But try to find hot dipped.

The framing screws have been well-reviewed.  

And construction screws are vastly preferred over drywalll screws.  

Progress.
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