Which backsaws should I have?
#11
  
I wonder what's a good useful set of backsaws? I suppose it would include a small dovetail saw with fine teeth, filed rip; a carcase saw filed cross cut, and a larger tenon saw filed rip. Anything else? I ask because I just picked up an old 12" Disston back saw and am contemplating its future. The teeth need some work, but the plate is straight.
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#12
  Re: Which backsaws should I have? by overland (I wonder what's a go...)
(09-21-2018, 10:42 AM)overland Wrote: I wonder what's a good useful set of backsaws? I suppose it would include a small dovetail saw with fine teeth, filed rip; a carcase saw filed cross cut, and a larger tenon saw filed rip. Anything else? I ask because I just picked up an old 12" Disston back saw and am contemplating it's future. The teeth need some work, but the plate is straight.

That sounds like a good set which should handle about 90% of cutting tasks on typical projects. You can always add another saw or two later if you find specific tasks that those three cannot do well.
Bob Page
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
In da U.P. of Michigan
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#13
  Re: Which backsaws should I have? by overland (I wonder what's a go...)
I just wrote a blog post about this a few months back. You might find it helpful. 

My short answer, though, is that I regularly use three backsaws:
1. a carcase saw (12" long, filed crosscut)
2. a dovetail saw (10" long, filed rip)
3. a tenon saw (14" long, filed rip)

Although I wouldn't want to do without any of them, the carcase saw is #1 on the list for a reason.  It's the backsaw I use the most.  The dovetail saw runs a close second, and the tenon saw a distant third.
Steve S.
------------------------------------------------------
Tradition cannot be inherited, and if you want it you must obtain it by great labour.
- T. S. Eliot

Tutorials and Build-Alongs at The Literary Workshop
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#14
  Re: RE: Which backsaws should I have? by Bibliophile 13 (I just wrote [url=ht...)
(09-21-2018, 05:06 PM)Bibliophile 13 Wrote: I just wrote a blog post about this a few months back. You might find it helpful. 

My short answer, though, is that I regularly use three backsaws:
1. a carcase saw (12" long, filed crosscut)
2. a dovetail saw (10" long, filed rip)
3. a tenon saw (14" long, filed rip)

Although I wouldn't want to do without any of them, the carcase saw is #1 on the list for a reason.  It's the backsaw I use the most.  The dovetail saw runs a close second, and the tenon saw a distant third.

AMEN
George

if it ain't broke, you're not tryin'
Quando omni flunkus, moritati.
Red Green

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#15
  Re: Which backsaws should I have? by overland (I wonder what's a go...)
I agree with Steve (Bibliophile). Over the years I've collected 10 or 12 backsaws. All of them sit unused in my till except the three Steve named. My 12" crosscut carcase saw is the most used of the bunch.
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#16
  Re: Which backsaws should I have? by overland (I wonder what's a go...)
(09-21-2018, 10:42 AM)overland Wrote: I wonder what's a good useful set of backsaws? I suppose it would include a small dovetail saw with fine teeth, filed rip; a carcase saw filed cross cut, and a larger tenon saw filed rip. Anything else? I ask because I just picked up an old 12" Disston back saw and am contemplating its future. The teeth need some work, but the plate is straight.

A 12" carcase saw style, filed rip at 12 to 14p will have you well on your way and; likely, be all you will need or want for most backsaw work. Find someone to setup initial sharpening (several on this list) then you can take over. Get the specifics for filing from them.
Bruce
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#17
  Re: Which backsaws should I have? by overland (I wonder what's a go...)
Carcass saws are dovetail saws. They are larger for cutting the thick dove tails on carcasses. Dovetail saws are for drawers. Traditionally, guys made drawer sides as thin as 5/16”. That’s a lot different than a 3/4” or 7/8” carcass. Thus 2 different saws.

If you work without power tools you will desperately need a cross cut filed backsaw. It should be 14” or 16” long. I’ll bet a million dollars you guys call this a carcass saw. Ben Seaton may have called it a sash saw.

I guess the names aren’t important. You need 2 dovetail saws, one large and one small. You need another saw filed cross cut. A 14” is easier for newer sawyers. Then you need a larger tenon saw if you do architectural sized work. A frame saw works fine. I used one for many years. But an 18” tenon saw is nice to have. But not an absolute necessity. You can also use a panel saw, a short open rip saw, to cut tenons. It’s just a little harder.
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#18
  Re: Which backsaws should I have? by overland (I wonder what's a go...)
I'll echo Adam.

The bench saws I would grab in a fire ...

Gramercy dovetail (9" 0.18" plate, 19 tpi) and Independence tools dovetail (10" 0.02" plate 15 tpi). I don't need both, but ...

Gramercy sash (14" plate, 13 ppi rip). Used for most tenons and wide dovetails.

Eccentric Tools (Andrew Lunn) 14 ppi cross cut, 11 1/4" plate. Used for cross cuts.

Z-saw dovetail (9 1/2" plate, 26 tpi). Excels in very fine detail cuts in thin work pieces.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#19
  Re: Which backsaws should I have? by overland (I wonder what's a go...)
I won't add to the list because I think you've gotten good suggestions, but I will say that I use my crosscut filed carcase saw (mine's a Lie-Nielsen) a lot more than I would have thought before I got it.  It comes in very handy for sizing smaller pieces to length, trimming mouldings, etc.  And I'll echo Derek's suggestion of at least one Japanese style Z-Saw for trimming small pieces.  I actually have a ryoba (two-sided Japanese saw where one side if filed rip an the other filed crosscut) that I carry in my car. It comes in handy for breaking down lumber that's too long to fit in the car.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#20
  Re: Which backsaws should I have? by overland (I wonder what's a go...)
Hi Derek,
Funny you should mention Gramercy saws. I was recently traveling and picked up a FWW “Best Tools of 2018” to read on the plane. They had an article about best dovetail saws. I realize there are many well built saws on the market. But I don’t think the Gramercy gets the respect it deserves. Joel based that saw on historic saws. All anyone talks about is how small the handle is.

When you make a desk, those drawer sides are like 3/16”. You really need a saw with close to 20tpi. The narrow saw plate is better too. It’s easier to control, more typical of old saws. The article talked about hang angle, which, for any other saw I would congratulate FWW for. But having a handle that extends below the toothed edge can limit some techniques. I would never own a saw where the handle hung below the tooth line.

I think a lot of woodworkers make every project out of 4/4 stock. So maybe what I’m saying doesn’t matter. Personally, I think it’s important to vary stock thickness. And if you choose to do that, and work with thinner stock, you need a saw like the Gramercy.
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