Show me your Hammers
#16
  Re: Show me your Hammers by C. in Indy (This summer I found ...)
Last count I was at 70 something hammers, mallets, etc under 4 lbs. Not counting camping hatchets but including a few wood working hatchets. 

Adam, I have a new Vaughn 23 oz steel framing hammer with a similar hatchet style handle. Easily the nicest and most effective framing hammer I've used. I wonder if the advantage isn't largely in the handle.
Blackhat
Common decency is as rare as common sense. I figure there was only a finite amount of both made and its getting shared out among too many folks.


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#17
  Re: RE: Show me your Hammers by adamcherubini (I think I know the c...)
(10-17-2018, 08:36 PM)adamcherubini Wrote: I think I know the company you mean. Pretty sure it was the only US manufacturer. Also pretty sure nobody is making them in the US anymore. Mine has a head from China married to an American handle in the USA.

The physics behind the claims of equal power fascinated me. Quick answer; it’s an impulse momentum issue which helped me understand my dead blows. But the physics don’t instantly guarantee a swing that’s twice as fast. Still, it’s a pretty nice hammer. But I’m a little careful with the claw.

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But I’m a little careful with the claw.

I'm with you there...It's lighter than aluminum even tho it is much stronger, I still wouldn't trust it... Crazy Big Grin Big Grin
The Marines I have seen around the world have the cleanest bodies, the filthiest minds, the highest morale, and the lowest morals of any group of animals I have ever seen. Thank God for the United States Marine Corps!
Eleanor Roosevelt


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#18
  Re: Show me your Hammers by C. in Indy (This summer I found ...)
(10-17-2018, 06:11 PM)Cuprousworks Wrote: My favorite is a rare claw hammer:

And the winner is...…...
"I tried being reasonable..........I didn't like it." Clint Eastwood
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#19
  Re: Show me your Hammers by C. in Indy (This summer I found ...)
To be fair, there’s a lot to hammers; the length of the head, the angle it makes with the handle. But for sure the handles are a huge part of the tool experience (not unlike saws or other hand tools). My patternmakers hammer had a thin neck that I felt provided whip action. That could be baloney, but it probably did reduce the impulse force a bit, which is the claim of the titanium hammers. Here’s the equation:

mv = SFdt

So, as you swing a hammer it’s speed accelerates. At the moment of impact, it possesses momentum= mass x velocity. So lighter hammers typically produce less momentum.

At the moment of impact the velocity goes to zero, and the momentum turns into an impulse which is the integral of force over time (dt). A soft hammer like titanium or rubber, elastically deforms, making the moment of impact longer and therefore lessens the force imparted. Best example is a dead blow hammer. They can be heavy and can possess a great deal of momentum, but they don’t marr wood because the force they hit with is lower because it takes place over a longer time. This is also the reason cars have "crumple zones" and more metal isn't always safer.

We really like our dead blow hammers. I’ve been using one to drive my framing chisels. I feel a sharp rap is harder on the tool’s edge. Dead blows are better at pushing.

For nailing, hammers need to produce enough force to overcome the strength of the wood fibers and friction between the nail and the wood. Too much force, so say the titanium hammer manufacturers, causes the nail and maybe the hammer head to elastically deform. This doesn't help you drive the nail in. Keep in mind that a very hard steel hammer will hit that nail for a very short amount of time. The force generated can be tremendous. That’s how impulses work. So hammer manufacturers are looking for a sweet spot, hard enough not to be damaged by nails or prying, and soft enough to drive a nail without unhelpful deformations. Titanium seems like a reasonable solution.

I think hammers are interesting tools. For sure though, head design aside, I think many of us would choose the hammer that feels best in our hands.
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#20
  Re: RE: Show me your Hammers by adamcherubini (To be fair, there’s ...)
(Yesterday, 08:41 AM)adamcherubini Wrote: To be fair, there’s a lot to hammers; the length of the head, the angle it makes with the handle. But for sure the handles are a huge part of the tool experience (not unlike saws or other hand tools). My patternmakers hammer had a thin neck that I felt provided whip action. That could be baloney, but it probably did reduce the impulse force a bit, which is the claim of the titanium hammers.  Here’s the equitation:

Mv = SFdt

So as you swing a hammer it’s speed accelerates. At the moment of impact, it possesses momentum= mass x velocity. So lighter hammers typically produce less momentum.

At the moment of impact the velocity goes to zero, and the momentum turns into an impulse which is the integral of force over time (dt). A soft hammer like titanium or rubber, elastically deforms, making the moment of impact longer and therefore the force imparted less.  Best example is a dead blow hammer. They can be heavy and can possess a great deal of momentum, but they don’t marr wood because the force they hit with is lower because it takes place for a longer time.

We really like our dead blow hammers. I’ve been using one to drive my framing chisels. I felel a sharp rap is harder on the tool’s edge. Dead blows are better at pushing.

For nailing, hammers need to produce enough force to overcome the strength of the wood fibers and friction between the nail and the wood. Too much force, so say the titanium hammer manufacturers, just causes the nail and maybe the hammer head to elastically deform. Keep in mind that a very hard steel hammer will hit that nail for a very short amount of time. The force generated can be tremendous. That’s how impulses work. So hammer manufacturers are looking for a sweet spot, hard enough not to be damaged by nails or prying, and soft enough to drive a nail without unhelpful deformations.

I think hammers are interesting tools. For sure tho, head design aside, I think many of us would choose the hammer that feels best in our hands.
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A few years ago at a tool meet, I purchased "The Hammer Book" for ten bucks...It was not a large book....Before I left the tool meet I had several offers to buy it, one offer was for $100.00, but I turned it down...A few months later I sold it on Ebay for $125.00.. It was the most comprehensive book on hammers I have ever seen..It was not in print at the time..I'm not sure whether or not it has been since then.
I have several lead hammers...They have traditionally been used by machinists for many years, frequently used to "center" stock in a lathe chuck because lead has little "rebound"...works much better than hammers made of steel...they work more like a deadblow.
The Marines I have seen around the world have the cleanest bodies, the filthiest minds, the highest morale, and the lowest morals of any group of animals I have ever seen. Thank God for the United States Marine Corps!
Eleanor Roosevelt


Jack Edgar, Sgt. USMC Korea 51/52
Get off my lawn ! Upset





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