Wood movement question
#7
  
I have some old growth pine siding I would like to use for a cabinet top. The problem is it is too thin to use without a substrate (3/8"). I was thinking of using a plywood substrate but I'm concerned about how to fasten it so wood movement wouldn't be a problem. The pine is over 100 yrs old so I was hoping it might be stable but I realize a change in humidity might still generate movement. Are there any adhesives or techniques to address this problem?

Papa Jim
I had a good day. I used every tool I own!
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#8
  Re: Wood movement question by Papa Jim (I have some old grow...)
(01-12-2019, 09:28 PM)Papa Jim Wrote: I have some old growth pine siding I would like to use for a cabinet top. The problem is it is too thin to use without a substrate (3/8"). I was thinking of using a plywood substrate but I'm concerned about how to fasten it so wood movement wouldn't be a problem. The pine is over 100 yrs old so I was hoping it might be stable but I realize a change in humidity might still generate movement. Are there any adhesives or techniques to address this problem?

Papa Jim

I would glue it to new pine or some similar wood to build up the thickness.   Or, rip it down to 1/8" and veneer it to a plywood underlay.
WoodNET... the new safespace
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#9
  Re: Wood movement question by Papa Jim (I have some old grow...)
Get the pine down by resaw and use it like a veneer top and bottom of the substrate. If substrate is ply, go cross grain to the last ply.
Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things. -- G. Carlin
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#10
  Re: Wood movement question by Papa Jim (I have some old grow...)
(01-12-2019, 09:28 PM)Papa Jim Wrote: I have some old growth pine siding I would like to use for a cabinet top. The problem is it is too thin to use without a substrate (3/8"). I was thinking of using a plywood substrate but I'm concerned about how to fasten it so wood movement wouldn't be a problem. The pine is over 100 yrs old so I was hoping it might be stable but I realize a change in humidity might still generate movement. Are there any adhesives or techniques to address this problem?

Papa Jim

Even if the pine is 100 years old, it will still move if the humidity changes, 

2 Options, laminate it to a similar new (but boring) wood, that is going to move in a similar way. Then you make your cabinet to work with that like normal. 
Or
Make veneer, which is VERY thin, and then glue that to a stable substrate like ply. 

Both a OK options.

Solid wood to ply is going to end badly.
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#11
  Re: Wood movement question by Papa Jim (I have some old grow...)
Thanks guys. As much as I love that pine I can see I would be better off with a sheet of cabinet grade plywood. I have other places I can use the pine where movement won't be a problem.  It is pretty stuff:

   
I had a good day. I used every tool I own!
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#12
  Re: Wood movement question by Papa Jim (I have some old grow...)
I think you just found the best solution to your "problem." That board looks really nice.

Simon
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