New Project GNU
#21
  Re: New Project GNU by Scoony (Getting ready to sta...)
Is this the one you were talking about






It looks pretty good to me after watching the 33 minutes worth
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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#22
  Re: RE: New Project GNU by Arlin Eastman (Is this the one you ...)
(01-25-2019, 08:25 PM)Arlin Eastman Wrote: Is this the one you were talking about






It looks pretty good to me after watching the 33 minutes worth

Yup. Larry has a great set of videos on gunsmith stuff. Always very informative.
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#23
  Re: New Project GNU by Scoony (Getting ready to sta...)
A little progress on the forearm.  I cut it down from the original length, almost 5" off the piece and glued on a piece of ebony. 

   

Clamped up for the night.

   

And this morning spent some time removing excess material

   

Found that the micro plane did the best work at removing material. I was also using the barrel channel scraper and that leaves a nice finished surface behind on the ebony.  I could not get too far as I really need to get a new barrel ordered and installed before fitting the forearm. 

Also practiced a little more on checkering. Found that no overhead light, but a few lights off to the side creating shadows helped to see the progress. Overhead lights just washes out the grooves making it hard to see what the cutter is doing. No pics of that since I still need a lot of practice.
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#24
  Re: RE: New Project GNU by Scoony (A little progress on...)
(01-27-2019, 08:26 PM)Scoony Wrote:  Found that no overhead light, but a few lights off to the side creating shadows helped to see the progress. Overhead lights just washes out the grooves making it hard to see what the cutter is doing.


I've been watching C&Rsenal : Anvil gunsmithing. Mark likes to have all of the lights off in the shop, then use an adjustable light to create a raking light to create the shadows. Having the lights off in the shop relaxes your eyes allowing you to work longer.

Nice work, keep posting updates!
Mark

I'm no expert, unlike everybody else here - Busdrver


Nah...I like you, young feller...You remind me of my son... Timberwolf 03/27/12

Here's a fact: Benghazi is a Pub Legend... CharlieD 04/19/15

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#25
  Re: New Project GNU by Scoony (Getting ready to sta...)
I'm anxious to see some of your early/practice checkering attempts (for comparison to how bad mine looked).
Waiting to grow up beyond being just a member
http://www.metaltech-pm.com
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#26
  Re: New Project GNU by Scoony (Getting ready to sta...)
So cool.............  Cool
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#27
  Re: New Project GNU by Scoony (Getting ready to sta...)
I’ve always thought it would be fun to make a gunstock. I’m loving this!
Steve S.
------------------------------------------------------
Tradition cannot be inherited, and if you want it you must obtain it by great labour.
- T. S. Eliot

Tutorials and Build-Alongs at The Literary Workshop
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#28
  Re: RE: New Project GNU by Tony Z (I'm anxious to see s...)
(01-28-2019, 04:24 PM)Tony Z Wrote: I'm anxious to see some of your early/practice checkering attempts (for comparison to how bad mine looked).

I start off fine, then somehow will jump a line, but that's on unfinished walnut. I still need to get a good adjustable incandescent lamp which will help out a lot.

I have a piece of walnut that I am applying a gunstock type finish to practice checkering on. I am at the point where most of the grain is filled, and I need to start rubbing on a few finish coats. This will give me better practice since the stock needs to be finished prior to checkering.  

After I get some practice on the test piece, I have an old stock that came off a Rem 78 sportsman that will be checkered. It is a stained birch stock, so it will be interesting to see how it handles the checkering.
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#29
  Re: RE: New Project GNU by Scoony ([quote='Tony Z' pid=...)
(01-29-2019, 11:21 AM)Scoony Wrote: I start off fine, then somehow will jump a line, but that's on unfinished walnut. I still need to get a good adjustable incandescent lamp which will help out a lot.

I have a piece of walnut that I am applying a gunstock type finish to practice checkering on. I am at the point where most of the grain is filled, and I need to start rubbing on a few finish coats. This will give me better practice since the stock needs to be finished prior to checkering.  

After I get some practice on the test piece, I have an old stock that came off a Rem 78 sportsman that will be checkered. It is a stained birch stock, so it will be interesting to see how it handles the checkering.

My first firearm, more than 60 years ago (I'm 66), was a Stevens Favorite, in .25 rimfire. My dad filed the firing pin off to keep me from shooting my eye out! I tried "customizing" that gun when I was 12 or 13, broke the lower tang from the receiver in taking the butt stock off, and really making a mess of things trying to checker it.

I have several old, kitchen variety guns, given to me from deceased relatives, dating to the early of the 20th century. I swear the checkering on those was spaced better than an 1/8" between lines! I doubt I will ever revisit checkering, just don't have the time, but I love these "build alongs"!
Waiting to grow up beyond being just a member
http://www.metaltech-pm.com
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#30
  Re: RE: New Project GNU by Tony Z ([quote='Scoony' pid=...)
(01-29-2019, 03:06 PM)Tony Z Wrote: My first firearm, more than 60 years ago (I'm  66), was a Stevens Favorite, in .25 rimfire.  My dad filed the firing pin off to keep me from shooting my eye out!  I tried "customizing" that gun when I was 12 or 13, broke the lower tang from the receiver in taking the butt stock off, and really making a mess of things trying to checker it.

I have several old, kitchen variety guns, given to me from deceased relatives, dating to the early of the 20th century.  I swear the checkering on those was spaced better than an 1/8" between lines!  I doubt I will ever revisit checkering, just don't have the time, but I love these "build alongs"!

As a teenager, I picked up a German Mauser and Japanese Ariska. Dad bought me a gunsmith book. I sporterized the mouser and shot a deer with it. I made a stock from scratch out of cherry for the Ariska. That was a long time ago and I think one of my nephews may still have the Ariska, but the Mauser was lost after a divorce.

Checkering will be a new thing for me and I am actually excited to learn. I think I am going to make a tool called a jointer. Similar to a jointer plane, the tool helps to straighten out lines that have gone astray. I just need to order some drill rods and get some fresh chisels.
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