Jointer Options
#17
  Re: Jointer Options by ajkoontz (I had a question abo...)
(02-01-2019, 01:53 PM)ajkoontz Wrote: I had a question about sharpening jointer knives, that took me back down the rabbit hole of looking for a new jointer and wouldn't you know it Powermatic is having a 10% off sale. So my question today is- is the parallelogram design worth $700 more than the wedge bed design? I'm pretty set on a Powermatic, but if somebody wants to talk me into a Grizzly I'll listen. Whatever I do, I'm 100% sure I'm getting a spiral cutterhead. 

I have a PM 54a right now, so I can wait if I need to. I've been looking used for a while now, and not finding a lot of 8" jointers.

Truing up the beds on a jointer is much easier with a parallelogram jointer. On a wedge bed you will be OK if the castings are all true, and nothing ever gets out of alignment. I have shimmed wedge bed jointers and parallelogram jointers. If Powermatic has the same people building you jointer as built my Powermatic planer, I would go for the parrallelogram model.
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#18
  Re: Jointer Options by ajkoontz (I had a question abo...)
(02-01-2019, 01:53 PM)ajkoontz Wrote: I had a question about sharpening jointer knives, that took me back down the rabbit hole of looking for a new jointer and wouldn't you know it Powermatic is having a 10% off sale. So my question today is- is the parallelogram design worth $700 more than the wedge bed design? I'm pretty set on a Powermatic, but if somebody wants to talk me into a Grizzly I'll listen. Whatever I do, I'm 100% sure I'm getting a spiral cutterhead. 

I have a PM 54a right now, so I can wait if I need to. I've been looking used for a while now, and not finding a lot of 8" jointers.

I upgraded many years ago from a 6" Jet jointer to an 8" Shop Fox with a Byrd shelix head. For me it has been a very good move. If I need to flatten out something wider than 8" I can always rig up a sled and use my 15" Shop Fox planer, which also has a shelix head.

I think from a price/performance perspective, Grizzly stationary power tools are difficult to beat - YMMV.

Doug
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#19
  Re: RE: Jointer Options by fredhargis (Regarding the parall...)
(02-01-2019, 03:07 PM)fredhargis Wrote: Regarding the parallelogram beds, I just don't see it being worthwhile if it costs much extra. If there's no price difference, then get them...but if it's several hundred dollars, it's too much (IMHO). I have a Jet 8" bought new in 1999. It's never needed adjusting, and I've moved the infeed (maybe) a dozen times in those 20 years. Don't know how a parallelogram would have improved anything.

You are making the case for why I so enjoy my parallelogram jointer in your reply when you mention you maybe have moved the in-feed table a dozen times in twenty years. When it takes literals 3 seconds to move the table for a deeper initial cut then another 3 seconds to move it back to the stop at a fine cut I move the table all the time. a rough edge that would take 6 passes with a table left on fine would take only 2 passes on a table that easily and quickly moves. This saves time and wear and tear on the knives.

What I am saying is a parallelogram jointer is like a 4 wheel drive pickup. you don't know why you need one until you own one and then will never live without it.

I must admit I am a little biased. before the DJ-20 I owned a harbor freight 7" jointer. To get the tables planer on this jointer I had shims in several spots on the ways. I hardly dared move the tables for fear the shims would move. I did a lot of work with this jointer but like you rarely moved the tables.
Proud maker of large quantities of sawdust......oh, and the occasional project!
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#20
  Re: Jointer Options by ajkoontz (I had a question abo...)
We all have our preferences. I don't move my table much because there isn't a need too (once more: my opinion). The advantage of a parrellogram jointer is often touted as the gap being consistent between the table and the cutter head...big deal, that's never been an issue for me. In the meantime, they (used to, anyway) cost considerably more. My point is that they aren't worth the extra cost; as they say: YMMV. I might prefer that style over the DT ways I have, I just won't pay a lot for it.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#21
  Re: Jointer Options by ajkoontz (I had a question abo...)
I've argued for several years now that a convenient, sometimes cheapest, route to a wide (12") jointer is to get a combo machine. I moved from a generic 8" jointer to a Hammer A3-31 some while ago, and have rarely needed wider than 12". The shorter jointer table (compared with a typical 8" top) is irrelevant. It has never been an issue.

The cost of a machine such as this is not cheap, however there are other machines one can consider. Or second hand (not many second hand A3-31s for the obvious reason that they do the job). Jet and Grizzly, amongst others, also have versions.

And do not forget that you get a thickness planer as well. The Hammer is well worth the entry fee.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#22
  Re: Jointer Options by ajkoontz (I had a question abo...)
For 25 years I did not own a jointer and work mostly with rough sawn boards from the sawmill. My method of work is to get one side flat with a #5 plane with a cambered blade and a couple of winding sticks. Within 5 minutes, I have a side flat enough to place face down on the 13” planer for final flattening. Edges were jointed with a #7. Working with wood straight from the mill, most of my lumber is wider than 8”.

After years of working that way, I’ve found face flattening is much easier than edge jointing by hand. So, when an opportunity arose to buy a used Powermatic 6” helical head jointer last year for a good price, I jumped at it. I now use that for edge jointing. Always hated the idea of setting up straight knives and really think the helical head is a worthy upgrade.

Currently planning a new table which will require flattening some 15” wide walnut boards I have, for the table top by hand. But, I will be using the Powermatic for the edges before glue up.
John
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