Removing an Iowa Faucet (hydrant)
#11
  
It's a long story, so I'll skip to the question: I have an Iowa faucet in the yard I'd like to remove....without digging down 6'. This faucet is actually hooked to a line that has long since rusted out and no longer has water in it...that rusted out pipe is connected to my neighbors water system (the long story part). I thought about taking a skidloader and just trying to pull it out with the bucket (would that work?) but my goal is to try and salvage the faucet for donation to the Habitat restore. If I get a big enough pipe wrench, would I just be able to unscrew it from the surface? I do have a small backhoe and could dig down, but I don't want to deal with the mess. I also thought about just digging down a few inches and cutting it off....obviously destroying the faucet. What are my options?
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#12
  Re: Removing an Iowa Faucet (hydrant) by fredhargis (It's a long story, s...)
(02-19-2019, 02:06 PM)fredhargis Wrote: It's a long story, so I'll skip to the question: I have an Iowa faucet in the yard I'd like to remove....without digging down 6'. This faucet is actually hooked to a line that has long since rusted out and no longer has water in it...that rusted out pipe is connected to my neighbors water system (the long story part). I thought about taking a skidloader and just trying to pull it out with the bucket (would that work?) but my goal is to try and salvage the faucet for donation to the Habitat restore. If I get a big enough pipe wrench, would I just be able to unscrew it from the surface? I do have a small backhoe and could dig down, but I don't want to deal with the mess. I also thought about just digging down a few inches and cutting it off....obviously destroying the faucet. What are my options?

I would attack it with a wrench and penetrating oil if lack of movement hit it with heat and go at it again
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#13
  Re: Removing an Iowa Faucet (hydrant) by fredhargis (It's a long story, s...)
I wonder how they got their name?  Grew up in Iowa - saw them all over.  Actually have one in my yard down by the boat house.  Mine is actually attached to a buried garden hose.
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#14
  Re: Removing an Iowa Faucet (hydrant) by fredhargis (It's a long story, s...)
I have removed a few. It is very unlikely that you will be able to unscrew that from the surface without digging down. We were never able to. We also don't have to dig as deep here, only 18-24". 6' down you have to dig a hole large enough that you can fit in it. What is the line is made of that it's attached to, could you dig down to the line then reach it with some kind of cutting tool and cut the line off?
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#15
  Re: Removing an Iowa Faucet (hydrant) by fredhargis (It's a long story, s...)
If the old line is rusted and is in non use, get a 2' pipe wrench and unscrew or twist it off the old pipe.
Steve





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#16
  Re: RE: Removing an Iowa Faucet (hydrant) by Stwood_ (If the old line is r...)
(02-19-2019, 03:16 PM)Stwood_ Wrote: If the old line is rusted and is in non use, get a 2' pipe wrench and unscrew or twist it off the old pipe.
 If it will not unscrew just dig down a little and cut off.   If it is rusted that bad it will not be any good anyway.   I think trying to just pull it will be a big enough mess and it will still be junk.   Some soil types like to become part of the metal object and impossible to break free.   Roly
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#17
  Re: Removing an Iowa Faucet (hydrant) by fredhargis (It's a long story, s...)
(02-19-2019, 03:16 PM)Stwood_ Wrote: If the old line is rusted and is in non use, get a 2' pipe wrench and unscrew or twist it off the old pipe.
That's kinda of what I was thinking. The supply piping almost certainly has to be galvanized pipe, since that's what the original house has for plumbing. It may not be 6' deep, but I'd imagine it's probably at least 3' down, and that's still more digging than I want to do.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#18
  Re: RE: Removing an Iowa Faucet (hydrant) by Roly ([quote='Stwood_' pid...)
(02-19-2019, 03:34 PM)Roly Wrote:  If it will not unscrew just dig down a little and cut off.  


Yep
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#19
  Re: RE: Removing an Iowa Faucet (hydrant) by fredhargis ([quote='Stwood_' pid...)
(02-19-2019, 04:21 PM)fredhargis Wrote: That's kinda of what I was thinking. The supply piping almost certainly has to be galvanized pipe, since that's what the original house has for plumbing. It may not be 6' deep, but I'd imagine it's probably at least 3' down, and that's still more digging than I want to do.

I agree on the galvanized, but it could also be the old black plastic roll pipe, especially if it's long distance.
If it's aged and hardened, it may just snap off.

I laid PVC here on our place, about 600' of it, about 18 years ago. PVC, then a short length (2') black pipe (gas), elbow, then the hydrant is screwed into the elbow.
I've got one of five leaking Rolleyes  below ground that I need to dig up. I just shut it off till spring shows back up. I can't just unscrew mine, as it would be risky, possibly breaking the pvc if the line moves in the dirt.
Steve





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#20
  Re: Removing an Iowa Faucet (hydrant) by fredhargis (It's a long story, s...)
On my old truck I replaced the brake rotors a few years ago. It was the first (and only, thanks to an an inattentive driver) time I replaced the rotors.

Two were somewhat hard to remove, one was very hard, and one required a created mechanism to release. I had to thread 1/2" bolts with two nuts through the caliper bracket, which would push the rotor off the hub. With nothing but rust alone, no fastener, that took a lot of force and sounded like a gunshot when it finally released.

Galvanic corrosion is not something that can be easily defeated. If it's truly rusted, call it a loss.
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