Drywall
#30
  Re: Drywall by mickanick1 (Hello everyone, I wa...)
Yup ceiling first and like mentioned no screws within 16" of the walls which is especially required if you have trusses as trusses move upward when there is a snow load or wind load. As for the material choice 1/2" ultralight is the board of choice now. It's a little lighter and it's stiffer than regular drywall.
 
   If it's an area that will take more than a day to do the ceiling buy a drywall lift. You can buy a lift from Northern tool for about $120 when on sale and use the $10 coupon or amazon is often close to that price. Renting costs more than buying.

      If you are near me let me know and you can borrow my drywall lift and collated screw gun.
Reply
#31
  Re: RE: Drywall by Roly ([quote='mike4244' pi...)
(03-25-2019, 06:44 AM)Roly Wrote: How do you learn if you never do it ?   Roly

Roly, I was trying to inform the OP that rocking a garage ceiling is not an easy job if you have not done it. I would give the same advice to a person wanting to pour concrete.
If the garage is under living space then codes may require double 1/2" fire code rock. Almost every garage ceiling is at least 9'-0" high. 
Generally 12'-0" sheets are used for the ceiling. Just getting a sheet onto the lift is too much for the average person. Taping is a job I would only do if I could not get a taper at a reasonable price. I dislike taping more than hanging rock. I hung rock  as part of my job as a carpenter. Only taped on side jobs.
If you want to learn, start with a small room .

mike
Reply
#32
  Re: Drywall by mickanick1 (Hello everyone, I wa...)
I bought a lift for the basement ceiling I did.  I want to do the other half eventually, so I haven't sold it.  I didn't think it was that hard, but thank goodness I don't have to do that for a living.  It came out pretty well, I think.  Raking light doesn't show too many flaws. I did a complete skim coat though.
Reply
#33
  Re: Drywall by mickanick1 (Hello everyone, I wa...)
Hire someone to do it you can. 
Except for little jobs, I quite doing drywall a long time ago.  I've found by the time you figure your time, renting a lift, material cost, you may find its not worth the savings.  Not to mention you'll have a much better quality job.  Messing up one or two cutouts will change your mind quickly.

Aside from that:

Drywall lift - that's a must.
Walls supporting ceiling - that's baloney.  The reason for doing the ceiling first is 1) cutting doesn't have to be as precise, and 2) you won't scar up the walls putting in place.

Finishing is a high skill level job.  If you don't care what it looks like, go for it.

You will probably need fireproof drywall. Check with a builder or your supplier.
Everything is a prototype so its a one of a kind.
Reply
#34
  Re: RE: Drywall by Snipe Hunter ([quote='Roly' pid='7...)
(03-25-2019, 08:57 AM)Snipe Hunter Wrote: 100%

I never worked in the trades. Between asking questions, reading, web-forums and now we have the luxury of YouTube at our fingertips, I've come to the point where my work looks as good as any contractor's as long as I do it the way it is supposed to be done. I just don't bite off more than I can chew. If I didn't do the work myself, I wouldn't be able to afford it. I may not be as fast as a contractor but the finished product is as good, maybe better because I have a vested interest. Something I learned is that things are done in a certain order, certain way wth certain materials for very good reasons. If I deviate from those ways, I wind up learning those reasons. For instance: installing ceiling drywall first and then the wall drywall from the top down is the right way.

Practice makes perfect. It will be easier next time, and even easier the time after that.

Personally, I think it's good experience for most home owners to do some of this kind of stuff themselves.  Not arguing that stuff like drywall and roofing are all that much fun, but with a little bit of competence and some help, they aren't the most difficult jobs.  The sense of satisfaction alone, when done, is worth it.  IMHO.  Rocking a garage ceiling would be a good learning experience, presuming it doesn't have to be finished as flawlessly as in the living space.
If you are going down a river at 2 mph and your canoe loses a wheel, how much pancake mix would you need to shingle your roof?

http://blazinbladesscrollers.webs.com/
Reply
#35
  Re: RE: Drywall by rwe2156 (Hire someone to do i...)
(03-27-2019, 11:48 AM)rwe2156 Wrote: Walls supporting ceiling - that's  baloney. 

how do you figure?

Of coarse it does. It also insures a tight seam and less mud, much easier finishing and zero movement once installed.
 
"My mortgage self-identifies as a student loan."
... Kizar Sozay


Neil Summers Home Inspections
Reply
#36
  Re: RE: Drywall by rwe2156 (Hire someone to do i...)
(03-27-2019, 11:48 AM)rwe2156 Wrote: Hire someone to do it you can. 
Except for little jobs, I quite doing drywall a long time ago.  I've found by the time you figure your time, renting a lift, material cost, you may find its not worth the savings.  Not to mention you'll have a much better quality job.  Messing up one or two cutouts will change your mind quickly.

Aside from that:

Drywall lift - that's a must.
Walls supporting ceiling - that's  baloney.  The reason for doing the ceiling first is 1) cutting doesn't have to be as precise, and 2) you won't scar up the walls putting in place.

Finishing is a high skill level job.  If you don't care what it looks like, go for it.

You will probably need fireproof drywall.  Check with a builder or your supplier.
One really good reason for ceilings first, if using roof trusses is this:  one is not supposed to use screws withing several inches of the sheet edge on walls not anchored to the truss.  Google truss uplift.  In that case the only support for the ceiling sheet's edge is the wall drywall.
Reply
#37
  Re: RE: Drywall by kencombs ([quote='rwe2156' pid...)
(03-27-2019, 07:04 PM)kencombs Wrote: One really good reason for ceilings first, if using roof trusses is this:  one is not supposed to use screws withing several inches of the sheet edge on walls not anchored to the truss.  Google truss uplift.  In that case the only support for the ceiling sheet's edge is the wall drywall.

That's certainly true for top floors. I see a lot of split seams on top floors caused by truss uplift. I'll see as much as 1/2" movement where the truss pops up in the winter, opening the gap and as soon as things warm up, it's almost invisible. People try to add screws and mud which only makes the problem worse. They think I'm nuts when I tell them to locate the closet screw (on the ceiling) to the popped seam and remove it. There shouldn't be any screws within 16" of a wall on a top floor. If the ceiling drywall was installed correctly (resting on the wall drywall), there is no need for screws within 24" of a wall. This phenomenon also happens to a lesser extent near HVAC duct-work on any floor where temperatures swing drastically over the seasons.

We have two spots in our home, same truss but different rooms. It's on the do list. Remodeling the whole house so it's more of a punch-list item. We can hear the thud when the truss pops. Freaks the wife out.

Most people try to fix "nail-pops" and don't understand the nail-pop was caused by a moving truss, not by the weight of the ceiling dry-wall. Take out the nail/screw and fill the hole. 9 times out of 10, a nail pop will return if repaired if it's withing a couple feet of a wall. Most nail pop are within a couple feet of a wall.

Ceilings under joists as opposed to trusses don't suffer (nearly as much) from this but still, there's no need to have ceiling screws within 16" of a wall. The wall dry-wall provides a lot more support for the ceiling than a screw ever could.
 
"My mortgage self-identifies as a student loan."
... Kizar Sozay


Neil Summers Home Inspections
Reply
#38
  Re: Drywall by mickanick1 (Hello everyone, I wa...)
I've hung thousands of sheets and I agree, no screws near the walls. Spec.s usually call for 5 across on ceilings (about 12"o.c.) so instead of a screw at the wall, I double them up a foot away. Resting the ceiling on the wall also helps straighten out the top of the wall; this goes for cathedral ceilings as well. Another thing I started using are "Butt Boards". They create a butt joint similar to the tapered edge joints we call "flats". Now I can use mesh tape and Duro-bond to get first coat done fast. Corners still get paper and "green lid" mud so it will suck tight to the board. I never sand between coats, and after the third coat it doesn't need much sanding anyway. 

Another tip for beginners is to start with proper staging. It's tough to learn to hang and tape when you're still learning how to walk. Stilts are for Pros. I have them but I don't heal as fast as I used to. I like a real staging plank secured to milk crates or drywall buckets; whichever puts the top of my head just below the ceiling. If it's higher than those, I put legs on a 12' or 16' x 20" wide alum. staging plank. If you don't have one, a sheet of ply. and 2, 2x6's works well. (You can even leave the legs tall on one side for a guard rail if it's a little too high for comfort.) This staging will serve you throughout the project. Hanging, taping, sanding, painting, and even wiring and hanging lights are much easier when the ceiling is only head high.

One last thing. If you think you can hang drywall without a real drywall gun; it's time to call in the Pros! Your cordless impact or your drill with a "dimpler" will be of no use other than perhaps pulling your "misses".
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)