Stanley #34 wood jointer hand plane
#5
  
Well I was finally able to get back in the shop a little after a summer of health issues. I saved this hand plane from the junk pile when I was helping my brother clean out his GF's mothers garage. I didn't think too much of it when I saved it but after some investigation I'm glad I saved it. Turns out it's kind of a rare plane as not many were made. It's a Stanley #34 jointer, manufactured 1870-1918. All the parts were there and original except for the makeshift cobbled tote. Earlier in the summer I drilled and cut out the new tote from walnut. Today I finished it by conturing all the edges and gave it two coats of semigloss lacquer. It's going to be a display piece, even though it works, so I wasn't too worried about the durability of the finish.

If you want to see the entire restoration here's a link to the pictures.
https://flic.kr/s/aHsmFufxGB

Here's a picture of the new tote.


Here's the restored plane.

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#6
  Re: Stanley #34 wood jointer hand plane by wood-chips (Well I was finally a...)
That is cool. Nice job on the fix up.

Cool
Mark Singleton

Bene vivendo est optimum vindictae
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#7
  Re: Stanley #34 wood jointer hand plane by wood-chips (Well I was finally a...)
That looks great! I recall Chris Schwartz saying that transitional jointer planes are the best users of the transitional lot because they’re substantially lighter. Plus, you can even replace the stock with an extra long one you can make yourself. Not that I’d advise doing that to this plane.

Do you think you’re going to put it back into service? Or is it going up on a shelf as an heirloom?
Steve S.
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Tradition cannot be inherited, and if you want it you must obtain it by great labour.
- T. S. Eliot

Tutorials and Build-Alongs at The Literary Workshop
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#8
  Re: RE: Stanley #34 wood jointer hand plane by Bibliophile 13 (That looks great! I ...)
(07-27-2019, 01:47 PM)Bibliophile 13 Wrote: Do you think you’re going to put it back into service? Or is it going up on a shelf as an heirloom?

It will be a display item. The iron is a two piece, hardened steel forged to the mild steel iron. I attempted to sharpen the iron but it has too many deep pits from rust and neglect. The wood body is ok from the iron to the rear, however the section from the iron to the front has a gap of approximately 3/16" from flush at the front edge of the wood plane body.
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