Door jam replacement
#11
  
I have a metal exterior door on the house with a rotted jamb at the bottom on each side it’s installed in brick with a brick mold.
Should I replace the entire door, still in good shape of make/ buy a jamb and threshold. Do the sell a kit.
Thanks in advance
Gary
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#12
  Re: Door jam replacement by garmar60 (I have a metal exter...)
If only the jamb at the bottom is rotted you can cut the rotted portion off, replace it and then bondo over the seam. Assuming it's painted anyway. I have done that, it is much easier to do then replace the entire jamb and looks just as good at the end. Prime and paint the replacement pieces (especially the bottom end) to seal them and prevent them from wicking up water.
Janus was a disaster, coming or going -   K. L, McReynolds 07/01/2015
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#13
  Re: Door jam replacement by garmar60 (I have a metal exter...)
I would make or buy a new door frame.  If you contact the manufacturer of the door maybe they will sell you just the frame.  In any case, I would reuse the door if you like it and it functions well; no reason not to.  Door frames are pretty standard items, differing mostly only in width and the type of weatherseals they accept.  You should be able to find an aftermarket frame kit that will work even if you don't want to make one and the manufacturer isn't in business any longer or won't sell you one.  


Many door thresholds are screwed to the door frame and set in place as a single unit.  I'd use this opportunity to replace the threshold with a new one, too.  

John
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#14
  Re: Door jam replacement by garmar60 (I have a metal exter...)
depends on how badly rotted it is.  I had just a little bit of rot on my back door, so I cleaned it out, coated the raw wood with Copper Green.  When that was good and dry used Bondo Wood filler.  

sanded it, primed and painted and it looks as good as new.


if its beyond that, I would cut out the rotted sections and install new.

Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away. - Philip K. Dick

Mark

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#15
  Re: RE: Door jam replacement by crokett™ (If only the jamb at ...)
(09-17-2019, 10:45 AM)crokett™ Wrote: If only the jamb at the bottom is rotted you can cut the rotted portion off, replace it and then bondo over the seam.  Assuming it's painted anyway.  I have done that, it is much easier to do then replace the entire jamb and looks just as good at the end.  Prime and paint the replacement pieces (especially the bottom end) to seal them and prevent them from wicking up water.

Yep, use some pressure treated that has been sitting around a while (and isn't dripping wet), or something else rot resistant.

I do the same thing on window sills.  Reciprocating saw about halfway up the sill, chisel it out, pound a new piece in its place.

The key is the better lumber, the stuff the mills are using for door frames is very spongy.
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#16
  Re: RE: Door jam replacement by Phil Thien ([quote='crokett™' pi...)
Is it a metal or wood frame ?   I have seen metal frames where they were sealed on the sides and bottoms but water was getting in from above and could not drain out.  Look for this if there is no other reason for rotting out.  Roly
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#17
  Re: Door jam replacement by garmar60 (I have a metal exter...)
(09-16-2019, 09:01 PM)garmar60 Wrote: I have a metal exterior door on the house with a rotted jamb at the bottom on each side  it’s installed in brick with a brick mold.
Should I replace the entire door,  still in good shape of make/ buy a jamb and threshold. Do the sell a kit.  
Thanks in advance
Gary

I'm a woodworker so it's no big deal to make a new jamb.  Just take apart the old jamb carefully and use each piece as a guide to make new.   Easy.  You can also by jamb kits in the trim section of your local home improvement store.
WoodNET... the new safespace
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#18
  Re: Door jam replacement by garmar60 (I have a metal exter...)
Having to deal with this problem way too many times, I would first assess how badly it's rotted. The determining factor is if the rot is minor enough that the threshold is still firmly attached to the jambs. If it is then I gently remove only the loosely attached wood and paint, then treat the affected areas with 2-3 coats of Minwax wood hardener, bondo, spot putty, and primer.

If the threshold is loose or there are signs of water damage to the floor or any indication that water is getting inside, then the door unit has to come out. After the other repairs are made, and correctly flashed (including a threshold pan if you deem it necessary for problems like splashing or wind driven rain), you can decide if you want to splice in a new section of jamb. I usually have enough space to just back up a simple butt joint with 1/4" plywood to hold it together until it's back in the opening where the jamb shims, and both casings will keep it secure. I don't usually do this though; If I pull a door unit because it's rotted, it usually gets replaced with a new unit.

BTW, I've posted before about that jamb to threshold joint having to be inspected frequently and maintained. The best the manufacturers have come up with is to use P.T. for the bottom finger-jointed piece. They don't rot, but they don't stop the leaks either.
Sign at N.E. Vocational School Cabinetmaking Shop 1976, "Free knowledge given daily... Bring your own container"
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#19
  Re: Door jam replacement by garmar60 (I have a metal exter...)
Replace..

Hard to do bondo over rust, it's only a temporary fix. "rust never sleeps".
 
"My mortgage self-identifies as a student loan."
... Kizar Sozay


Neil Summers Home Inspections
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#20
  Re: RE: Door jam replacement by Snipe Hunter (Replace.. Hard to...)
(09-18-2019, 07:23 AM)Snipe Hunter Wrote: Replace..

Hard to do bondo over rust, it's only a temporary fix. "rust never sleeps".

I got the impression the door was metal, the jamb was wood.

Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away. - Philip K. Dick

Mark

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