Cedar mantle
#10
  
So I am doing this cedar mantle for a friends outdoor kitchen.  Huge stone fireplace.  It is covered but still open to the elements and this is Houston so hot humid summers (which last 9 months) - a couple freezing days a year

it is a natural edge mantle.  About 56" long - 10" deep and 8 3/4" thick

What would be the best finish - I thought about Waterlox Marine - but darn it's going soak up the coats.

Thanks

Robert
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#11
  Re: Cedar mantle by Wipedout (So I am doing this c...)
(10-29-2019, 11:31 AM)Wipedout Wrote: So I am doing this cedar mantle for a friends outdoor kitchen.  Huge stone fireplace.  It is covered but still open to the elements and this is Houston so hot humid summers (which last 9 months) - a couple freezing days a year

it is a natural edge mantle.  About 56" long - 10" deep and 8 3/4" thick

What would be the best finish - I thought about Waterlox Marine - but darn it's going soak up the coats.

Thanks

Robert

The best finish is likely no finish.  Anything you put on it will require maintenance, the amount depending upon which finish you choose.  If you use no finish it will just weather to a nice gray, and require no maintenance other than maybe washing it once or twice a year if some mold starts to grow.  Beyond that, a penetrating finish would be the next lowest maintenance option.  You might have to clean and reapply a fresh coat at least once a year to keep it looking good; just depends upon the exposure.  At the other end of the maintenance spectrum, something like Epifanes Marine Varnish, which looks amazing when new and well maintained, takes 7 coats to apply and will require at least one maintenance coat every year.  If the film gets damaged and water gets under it, then you are in for at least spot sanding to get rid of the damage and then building back all the coats in those areas.  And the old and new areas likely won't look the same when the repair is done.  

John
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#12
  Re: RE: Cedar mantle by jteneyck ([quote='Wipedout' pi...)
(10-29-2019, 02:34 PM)jteneyck Wrote: The best finish is likely no finish.  Anything you put on it will require maintenance, the amount depending upon which finish you choose.  If you use no finish it will just weather to a nice gray, and require no maintenance other than maybe washing it once or twice a year if some mold starts to grow.  Beyond that, a penetrating finish would be the next lowest maintenance option.  You might have to clean and reapply a fresh coat at least once a year to keep it looking good; just depends upon the exposure.  At the other end of the maintenance spectrum, something like Epifanes Marine Varnish, which looks amazing when new and well maintained, takes 7 coats to apply and will require at least one maintenance coat every year.  If the film gets damaged and water gets under it, then you are in for at least spot sanding to get rid of the damage and then building back all the coats in those areas.  And the old and new areas likely won't look the same when the repair is done.  

John

Thanks John

Here is the mantle.  Had to use handplane to flatten it but its looking good

   
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#13
  Re: RE: Cedar mantle by Wipedout ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(10-29-2019, 04:27 PM)Wipedout Wrote: Thanks John

Here is the mantle.  Had to use handplane to flatten it but its looking good

It must smell great in your shop, like a cedar lined chest.  The only way to keep it that color would be to use a film former product with a really good UV package, such as a 2K poly automotive clearcoat. Maintenance with that stuff will be even less fun than Epifanes, though likely less often.  

John
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#14
  Re: RE: Cedar mantle by jteneyck ([quote='Wipedout' pi...)
(10-29-2019, 05:05 PM)jteneyck Wrote: It must smell great in your shop, like a cedar lined chest.  The only way to keep it that color would be to use a film former product with a really good UV package, such as a 2K poly automotive clearcoat. Maintenance with that stuff will be even less fun than Epifanes, though likely less often.  

John

I dont think Ill go to that extreme - he has a lot of cedar in the outdoor are - huge cedar beams and posts (20 inch square)  plus 40 foot long roof that is covered in cedar and all of it is beginning to age.

Thanks for the advice

Robert

Oh and it does smell great.  all the shaving from planing are now in a bag to use to start fires in my firepit Smile
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#15
  Re: Cedar mantle by Wipedout (So I am doing this c...)
Cheap ol linseed oil, numerous coats. Outside enviroment, smell should go away fairly soon.
Steve





 
The Revos apparently are designed to clamp railroad ties and pull together horrifically prepared joints
WaterlooMark 02/9/2020

 When I use the toilet it smells just like fresh brewed coffee!
fredp 02/13/2020







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#16
  Re: Cedar mantle by Wipedout (So I am doing this c...)
This is the "outdoor kitchen" it's going to be installed in

   
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#17
  Re: RE: Cedar mantle by Wipedout (This is the "outdoor...)
(11-01-2019, 04:05 PM)Wipedout Wrote: This is the "outdoor kitchen" it's going to be installed in

Woah there, that's huge.  That looks like the mantle is going to be pretty well protected.  General Finishes WB Exterior 450 might work really well on the mantle.  Good UV package and should hold up really well with no/lttle direct rain and sun.  Goes on great both by spray or with a brush.  

John
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#18
  Re: RE: Cedar mantle by Wipedout ([quote='jteneyck' pi...)
(10-29-2019, 04:27 PM)Wipedout Wrote: Thanks John

Here is the mantle.  Had to use handplane to flatten it but its looking good

How will they keep that from checking like crazy?  I think I see one or two already.  Is it already fully dry, so the checks are done?
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