Entry hall table for a niece
#11
  
I thought that the build might begin with preparing the panels, since there has been some interest in the past shown in the shorter Hammer K3 sliders. Mine has a 49" long slider and a 31" wide table for the rip fence.

The build is an entry hall table for a wedding present for a niece. Her choice was this mid century modern piece, which will be the basis for the build. My job is to re-invent it somewhat. 




She wants Jarrah, and I have managed to find something spectacular ... a subtle fiddleback (curly) set of boards that will make a book match (as they are only about 9" wide each).










Most imagine that the value of a slider lies with cross-cutting. It certainly is so. However it is the rip using the slider - rather than the rip fence - which is so amazing.

One side of each board was to be ripped on the slider, before being jointed and resawn. Ripping on the slider is such an advantage with life edges. No jigs required. No rip fence to slide against. Just clamp the board on the slider, and run it past the saw blade. The long sliders can complete the rip in one quick pass. It occurred to me that I should take a few photos of ripping to width since the boards are longer than the slider. 

Here you can see that it comes up short ...




In actuality, with the blade raised fully, there is a cut of nearly 54" ...




The solution is to use a combination square to register the position of the side of the board at the front, and then slide the board forward and reposition it ...




... and repeat at the rear ...




The result is a pretty good edge, one that is cleaned up on the jointer in 1 or 2 passes, and then ready for resawing ...




This is the glued panel. It is long enough to make a waterfall two sides and top section (still oversize) ...




The following photo shows the lower section at the rear. What I wanted to show is the way boards are stored. Since I shall not get back to this build until next weekend, all boards are stickered and clamped using steel square sections. 




The steel sections are inexpensive galvanised mild steel. These are covered in vinyl duct tape to prevent any marks on the wood and ease in removing glue ...




Done for the day ...




Enough for the case (top/bottom and sides), which will be through dovetailed with mitred corners, the stock for 4 legs (yet to be turned), and rails for the legs (the legs will be staked mortice-and-tenon) and attached with a sliding dovetail. 

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#12
  Re: Entry hall table for a niece by Derek Cohen (I thought that the b...)
(11-04-2019, 04:14 AM)Derek Cohen Wrote: I thought that the build might begin with preparing the panels, since there has been some interest in the past shown in the shorter Hammer K3 sliders. Mine has a 49" long slider and a 31" wide table for the rip fence.

The build is an entry hall table for a wedding present for a niece. Her choice was this mid century modern piece, which will be the basis for the build. My job is to re-invent it somewhat. 




She wants Jarrah, and I have managed to find something spectacular ... a subtle fiddleback (curly) set of boards that will make a book match (as they are only about 9" wide each).










Most imagine that the value of a slider lies with cross-cutting. It certainly is so. However it is the rip using the slider - rather than the rip fence - which is so amazing.

One side of each board was to be ripped on the slider, before being jointed and resawn. Ripping on the slider is such an advantage with life edges. No jigs required. No rip fence to slide against. Just clamp the board on the slider, and run it past the saw blade. The long sliders can complete the rip in one quick pass. It occurred to me that I should take a few photos of ripping to width since the boards are longer than the slider. 

Here you can see that it comes up short ...




In actuality, with the blade raised fully, there is a cut of nearly 54" ...




The solution is to use a combination square to register the position of the side of the board at the front, and then slide the board forward and reposition it ...




... and repeat at the rear ...




The result is a pretty good edge, one that is cleaned up on the jointer in 1 or 2 passes, and then ready for resawing ...




This is the glued panel. It is long enough to make a waterfall two sides and top section (still oversize) ...




The following photo shows the lower section at the rear. What I wanted to show is the way boards are stored. Since I shall not get back to this build until next weekend, all boards are stickered and clamped using steel square sections. 




The steel sections are inexpensive galvanised mild steel. These are covered in vinyl duct tape to prevent any marks on the wood and ease in removing glue ...




Done for the day ...




Enough for the case (top/bottom and sides), which will be through dovetailed with mitred corners, the stock for 4 legs (yet to be turned), and rails for the legs (the legs will be staked mortice-and-tenon) and attached with a sliding dovetail. 

Regards from Perth

Derek
I'm confused how you are going to use the steel rods and attach the legs so they're strong & stable. Just asking because I truly don't know how to do this sort of thing. Nice design & beautiful wood selection.
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#13
  Re: Entry hall table for a niece by Derek Cohen (I thought that the b...)
The steel sections are used as cauls. The legs will be attached via staked mortice-and-tenons into a stretcher, which is attached in turn with a sliding dovetail.

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
Reply
#14
  Re: RE: Entry hall table for a niece by Derek Cohen (The steel sections a...)
(11-04-2019, 10:56 AM)Derek Cohen Wrote: The steel sections are used as cauls. The legs will be attached via staked mortice-and-tenons into a stretcher, which is attached in turn with a sliding dovetail.

Regards from Perth

Derek

I would like to see the steps involved in attaching those legs. Thanks
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#15
  Re: Entry hall table for a niece by Derek Cohen (I thought that the b...)
As a tangent, how do you like those MatchFit clamps?
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#16
  Re: Entry hall table for a niece by Derek Cohen (I thought that the b...)
Fantastic clamps.

Routing waste: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/P...Waste.html




Clamping dovetails:




Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#17
  Re: Entry hall table for a niece by Derek Cohen (I thought that the b...)
We are building a version of this hall table ...




We left off last time with basic preparation of stock from rough sawn boards ..




A word of introduction before continuing: while I am best known for hand tool work, I am a blended woodworker and have a pretty full compliment of power tools, which I use. It is horses for courses - power does the grunt work and hands do the details and joinery. So there are machines here as well as hand tools, and I like to believe they coexist well in my builds, as they should.

I began this session by turning the legs ...







The Jarrah for the legs turned out a few shades lighter than expected, and I made an extra piece to experiment with different dye mixes. A final decision shall be made once the case is completed.

The panels needed to sized, which involved measuring from the centre line of the book-matched panels. The quickest way to square this up was to mark a line (in blue tape), and plane to it ... much faster than using power saws, etc.







Once done, you can square up on a jointer ..




... rip to width ...




... and cross cut ...




Here are the panels for the case (sides yet to be dimensioned for height) ...




Packed away for the night ...




When marking the dovetails, it pays to work precisely. Mark carefully ...


Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#18
  Re: Entry hall table for a niece by Derek Cohen (I thought that the b...)



My favourite dovetail saw is usually the one I sharpened most recently. This is an original Independence Tools saw by Pete Taran (circa 1995) ..




Completed side panels ...




It begins to be a little more fun as I get to use one of the features I recently built into my new Moxon vise - the Microjig clamps (details of Moxon vise here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMadeToo...Moxon.html).

These are used to hold the tail board to transfer to the pin board ...




Here you see the transferred tails outline in blue tape (easier to see in the hard wood). On the left is a model of the mitred ends that will be part of this build ...




Saw the pins ...




Note that the end pins are not sawn on the outsides.

Now turn the board around, and strike a vertical line at the outer pin ...




Saw this on the diagonal only. Do both sides ...




Place the board flat on the bench and create a chisel wall for each pin (earlier, this would have been done for each tail) ...




The chisel wall will make it easier to create a coplanar baseline when removing the waste (by preventing the chisel moving back over the line). Do this on both sides of the board before proceeding.

Now you can fretsaw away the waste.




Try and get this to about 1mm above the baseline ...




Here is a video of the process:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6O4rY_0zQs

To create the mitred ends, first mark ...




... and saw about 1mm from the line. This will later be flushed with a chisel for accuracy.




And so this is where we are up to at the end of the weekend ...




So will the sides fit ... or won't they .... mmmmm Smile

Regards from Perth

Derek
Articles on furniture building, shop made tools and tool reviews at http://www.inthewoodshop.com
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#19
  Re: Entry hall table for a niece by Derek Cohen (I thought that the b...)
Your modified moxon, for dovetail joint layout, is slick!
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#20
  Re: Entry hall table for a niece by Derek Cohen (I thought that the b...)
Coming along nicely Derek!!
Mark Singleton

Bene vivendo est optimum vindictae
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