How to do this
#14
  Re: RE: How to do this by Paul K. Murphy (I don't know for sur...)
(03-11-2020, 11:20 PM)Paul K. Murphy Wrote: I don't know for sure but I think it might be hackberry or sassafras. I don't think it's elm. If it were me, I'd start with a weak yellow stain and glaze it with burnt umber.

I was thinking that it is some sort of exotic wood, but hackbery could be a possibility. I have used quite a bit of sassafras and only a little of hackberry.

I agree with using a a lighter stain or dye, then a darker glaze or gel stain to get that look.
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#15
  Re: RE: How to do this by Scoony ([quote='Paul K. Murp...)
(04-02-2020, 10:43 AM)Scoony Wrote: I was thinking that it is some sort of exotic wood, but hackbery could be a possibility. I have used quite a bit of sassafras and only a little of hackberry.

I agree with using a a lighter stain or dye, then a darker glaze or gel stain to get that look.

As an aside, the wood in the pic is most probably Butternut. More figure for butternut than usual, but not out of the question.
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#16
  Re: How to do this by CEPenworks (I don't do much work...)
I did some tests and the family finally decided on a couple light coats of ruby shellac, then Minwax red oak oil stain wiped off real good then sealed with blonde shellac and clear coated with water clear poly. It is not the same as the picture but it is what they ended up liking. The dark gel stain was making everything too dark.
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