Shellac question
#11
  
I love shellac. It's easy to apply and looks and feels great.

But I have build up like this when applying to adjacent faces. I'm using a chip brush to apply. This is my first coat, so it'll be knocked back, of course, but how do I best deal with the excess that does this?


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Semper fi,
Brad

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#12
  Re: Shellac question by ®smpr_fi_mac® (I love shellac. It'...)
Brad, I won't be much help since I have never been able to brush shellac. It's something most folks can do, but I'm not one of them. I pad it on, using a pad made of a well worn/washed tee shirt (or a piece of linen cloth from the fabric store)stuffed with a wool filler. The wool gets "charged" (soaked) with the shellac, and then I wipe the pad across the surface. Since on a finished piece this doesn't get into nooks and crannys like corners I usually do a little touch up with a brush. I'm not suggesting this will solve your problem, though I think it might. But you should try padding it on and see if you get better results. There are numerous other ways to pad it on, I just described what works for me. As for fixing the build up (that's what's on the dovetails, correct?) a pad can also help with that, but not charged with shellac...just use DNA.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#13
  Re: Shellac question by ®smpr_fi_mac® (I love shellac. It'...)
Like Fred, I always have trouble brushing shellac. However, from experience with other products, I think your problem is with brushing technique. I always make sure that, when I'm working the edge, my brush stroke is going from he work surface to off into air space. Going the other way creates the possibility of "raking" the brush over the edge leaving a dribble running down the adjoining surface. Also, when making these edge strokes, I try to make sure that I have the minimum amount of product already laid near the edge so that I can use just the tips of the bristles to distribute it to the edge. I hope that is clear. It is easier to do than it is to describe. Since shellac dries so fast, I'm not sure this will work well. You will have to work fast. I think is is best to use Fred's method or spray. For small projects, rattle cans work very well.
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#14
  Re: RE: Shellac question by Willyou (Like Fred, I always ...)
I honestly don't see the problem.  But I will say that a chip brush is a poor choice for applying shellac.  A synthetic Taklon brush is said to work very well, but I've always used a china bristle brush.  I'm no expert applying shellac with a brush, but I get much better results using a brush designed for that task.  

Like others, for small stuff I wipe on shellac.  For large stuff I spray.  

John
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#15
  Re: Shellac question by ®smpr_fi_mac® (I love shellac. It'...)
I should have mentioned spray. To me, shellac is one of the easiest finishes to spray.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#16
  Re: Shellac question by ®smpr_fi_mac® (I love shellac. It'...)
Thanks, folks. I'll give the padding method a try. I don't own HVLP equipment and don't care to invest in a new system just now. I might in the future, though.

I had a china bristle brush but it got messed up. I need to replace it. I had a bunch of these chip brushes on hand and thought I'd give them a try.
Semper fi,
Brad

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#17
  Re: RE: Shellac question by ®smpr_fi_mac® (Thanks, folks. I'll...)
(04-10-2020, 01:37 PM)®smpr_fi_mac® Wrote: Thanks, folks.  I'll give the padding method a try.  I don't own HVLP equipment and don't care to invest in a new system just now.  I might in the future, though.

I had a china bristle brush but it got messed up.  I need to replace it.  I had a bunch of these chip brushes on hand and thought I'd give them a try.

I bought a Badger hair brush many years ago, dedicated it to shellac and never cleaned it, just a soak in some DNA before each use.  It was a tad expensive at the time, but over the years it owes me nothing.... does a great job.  I also tend to make thinner cuts as I mix my own from flakes.  I've found multiple coats work best for me.
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Non impediti ratione cogitationis
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#18
  Re: Shellac question by ®smpr_fi_mac® (I love shellac. It'...)
(04-10-2020, 01:42 PM)Admiral Wrote: I bought a Badger hair brush many years ago, dedicated it to shellac and never cleaned it, just a soak in some DNA before each use.  It was a tad expensive at the time, but over the years it owes me nothing.... does a great job.  I also tend to make thinner cuts as I mix my own from flakes.  I've found multiple coats work best for me.

True that^^^^^. Just let the brush harden, the next use soaking it in a little DNA (or even the shellac you plan to use) will soften it up.
I started with absolutely nothing. Now, thanks to years of hard work, careful planning, and perseverance, I find I still have most of it left.
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#19
  Re: Shellac question by ®smpr_fi_mac® (I love shellac. It'...)
(04-09-2020, 10:34 PM)®smpr_fi_mac® Wrote: I love shellac.  It's easy to apply and looks and feels great.

But I have build up like this when applying to adjacent faces.  I'm using a chip brush to apply.  This is my first coat, so it'll be knocked back, of course, but how do I best deal with the excess that does this?

Dunno if my sub-amateur experience will help, but here goes. I bought a couple of high-quality shellac brushes years ago. I forget where, but it was one of the reputable finishing web sites. I never had much luck eliminating streaks. i switched to blue Scott paper shop towels and a 1# cut. It has worked great for me if I put enough on that it doesn't dry instantly, rub it in, then give it a quick rub with a clean towel. After the last coat, hit it with steel wool.

Works for me, and I cannot paint shellac to save my life.
Best,
Aram, always learning

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: My woodworking photo site
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#20
  Re: Shellac question by ®smpr_fi_mac® (I love shellac. It'...)
Oh! I didn't realize I could let the brush harden and then refresh it with each use. I'll do that from now on. I also think my cut here may be a bit heavy. I'll thin it some.
Semper fi,
Brad

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