task lighting in shop
#11
  
Since my eyes don't work as well as before, I find I need a lot of task lighting for lay outs, the bandsW anb router table.  What are some of the additional lighting you aLL use?  Perfect world would be LED and magnetic base.  Have seen them on line but trying to get some personal inputl  Thanks.
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#12
  Re: task lighting in shop by weelis (Since my eyes don't ...)
I use magnetic-base lights from Peachtree Woodworking (about $20 each), and put regular household LED bulbs in them.

Because I have a low, currugated steel ceiling that they stick to, I've got them positioned above my bandsaw, my workbench, and other workspaces. They are easy for me to move around if I need to.
Bill Schneider
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#13
  Re: task lighting in shop by weelis (Since my eyes don't ...)
(06-28-2020, 06:27 PM)weelis Wrote: Since my eyes don't work as well as before, I find I need a lot of task lighting for lay outs, the bandsW anb router table.  What are some of the additional lighting you aLL use?  Perfect world would be LED and magnetic base.  Have seen them on line but trying to get some personal inputl  Thanks.

I use this LED gooseneck lamp on my bandsaw. It's perfect for the job.

I use two of these desktop LED gooseneck lamps on my workbench for hand work, like sawing dovetails. Perfect for the job, easy to position the light where you want it, and easy to move out of the way when they're not needed.
Best,
Aram, defying laws of geometry

"Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery


Web: http://awacs.smugmug.com/Woodworking
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#14
  Re: task lighting in shop by weelis (Since my eyes don't ...)
for close up work over the bench i have an old dentist light - swings around and puts the light where i need it - bought it on ebay several years ago
jerry
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#15
  Re: task lighting in shop by weelis (Since my eyes don't ...)
I prefer to use regular LED soft white light bulbs. Some of the led lights are the wrong spectrum for the best view.

I have a bunch of clamp lights I use and they are my favorite. Goose necks are nice too.

[Image: woods-clamp-on-hand-helds-stand-up-0160-...ressed.jpg]
"There are no strangers- only friends I haven't met.
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#16
  Re: task lighting in shop by weelis (Since my eyes don't ...)
Some LED floodlights from the ceiling, in swivel mounts might be be useful. 

15 watts of LED through out a LOT of light. A couple of them mounted over your shoulders and aimed down at the workbench will boost the light level a LOT.  Adjust the number of lights to suit.
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#17
  Re: task lighting in shop by weelis (Since my eyes don't ...)
In my old garage shop, I added probably 10 flourescent light fixtures, and zoned them to light either side independently. I used Daylight color'd bulbs. Don't mess with the very cheap fixtures.
Still Learning,

Allan Hill
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#18
  Re: task lighting in shop by weelis (Since my eyes don't ...)
I use articulated arm lamps. The ones with the shade supported by double spring loaded arms.
For now, I am running old incandescent bulbs removed from service when we did the major
switch over to LED everywhere else. Seemed a waste to toss em, and using them up with the
task lamps ( most of which I got at yard/estate sales for cheap ) they will last quite awhile longer.
Probably they will end up with LED bulbs too!!
Mark Singleton

Bene vivendo est optimum vindictae
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#19
Photo    Re: task lighting in shop by weelis (Since my eyes don't ...)
I use an old draftsman's lamp on my RAS and that magnetic based lamp mentioned earlier on my band saw.
Was living the good retired life on the Lake. Now just living retired.
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#20
  Re: task lighting in shop by weelis (Since my eyes don't ...)
Weelis, Like you, my old eyes appreciate plenty of light on my work. I've tried a lot of things over the years to light up my shop. These are some of the ideas that have worked for me.

I have never found magnetic-base lamps to be very satisfactory. They do OK on horizontal surfaces but machine vibration causes them to slip and slide around on vertical surfaces like my bandsaw frame. I've found ways to fasten work lights to all of my machines (except my jointer/planer) with screws and bolts to eliminate that problem. The way to affix them is not always apparent; you have to be a little creative. My table saw light is an example:


IMG_4413 by Hank Knight, on Flickr

This light also services my router table extension:


IMG_0169 by Hank Knight, on Flickr

I have a row of track lights above my workbench that focuses on my bench top. In addition, I have two work lights that attach to any dog hole on my bench top.


889C75AD-8ADD-4967-A2FB-A23614384B0F by Hank Knight, on Flickr

The one on the right in the photo above is a gooseneck LED light. The shop-made base screws into one of these Veritas Bench Anchors from Lee Valley:

https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/shop/too...nch-anchor

The one on the left is a common articulated arm draftsman's lamp. The pin that slips into it's clip-on base fits one of these Lamp Bushings also from Lee Valley:

https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/shop/har...mp-bushing

The lamp bushings and the bench anchor are easily and quickly moved to any new dog hole to reposition the lamp. With these fixtures I can get plenty off light on just about any work in my workshop.

Hope this helps.
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