New to turning, looking for beginners info
#7
  
I’ve been wood working for years, and was never sure I wanted to get into turning.
Been looking on Craigslist for a couple years and missed some opportunities, decided to pull the trigger on a 46-701(700). I know these have issues with the reeves pulleys, but for now it seems solid, and not used much.
It can with a NIB chuck, pen attachment, a nice Nova drill chuck, some craftsman HSS chisels, calipers and some pen kits.
I really have now idea where to start. Will be looking on YouTube for some beginners info. I do have a slow speed grinder that I bought years ago, but no sharpening attachments.
So any advice on sharpening jigs would be helpful.





_____
Darrell
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#8
  Re: New to turning, looking for beginners info by Darrell D. ([color=#444444][font...)
Welcome to the slippery slop.
The best advice I received was get involved with a local club.  Well the pandemic aint helping that either!  The local Woodcraft here is advertising classes again.  The classes I took were helpful.

You really should learn to sharpen with a quality jig.

Good luck, you are going to have some fun.
"I tried being reasonable..........I didn't like it." Clint Eastwood
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#9
  Re: RE: New to turning, looking for beginners info by Bill Holt (Welcome to the slipp...)
(07-28-2020, 08:11 AM)Bill Holt Wrote: Welcome to the slippery slop.
The best advice I received was get involved with a local club.  Well the pandemic aint helping that either!  The local Woodcraft here is advertising classes again.  The classes I took were helpful.

You really should learn to sharpen with a quality jig.

Good luck, you are going to have some fun.

Thanks, we have a wood craft in the area and I know they do a lot of classes, I'll check one out.

My fear in getting into turning was that "slippery slope"
_____
Darrell
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#10
  Re: RE: New to turning, looking for beginners info by Bill Holt (Welcome to the slipp...)
(07-28-2020, 08:11 AM)Bill Holt Wrote: You really should learn to sharpen with a quality jig.

Or, as you don't use power all the time to get a new edge on your other tools, you could hone them, using the existing bevel as a reference, as you do with the others.  Jigs are used where the angle is variable, and the "good" ones are those which produce a variable angle you are comfortable with, rather than force you to use what they produce.  

Your set looks like you might be lucky, and have carbon steel, with, possibly forged pattern gouges with constant angles requiring no jig.  If the gouges are cylindrical, you are well advised to use other people's until you find a comfortable profile, then find out how they got it.  Once you've got it, use stones or (diamond) hones for that freshened edge, and save the steel you payed for.
Better to follow the leader than the pack. Less to step in.
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#11
  Re: New to turning, looking for beginners info by Darrell D. ([color=#444444][font...)
Some people use this shop-made jig for sharpening:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ws_JoC4BXOQ

I personally use the very popular Wolverine Sharpening Jig.  But I started with the just a grinder and the little shelf that came with it.
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#12
  Re: RE: New to turning, looking for beginners info by badwhiskey (Some people use this...)
(07-28-2020, 08:11 AM)Bill Holt Wrote: Welcome to the slippery slop.
The best advice I received was get involved with a local club.  Well the pandemic aint helping that either!  The local Woodcraft here is advertising classes again.  The classes I took were helpful.

You really should learn to sharpen with a quality jig.

Good luck, you are going to have some fun.

(07-28-2020, 01:24 PM)MichaelMouse Wrote: Or, as you don't use power all the time to get a new edge on your other tools, you could hone them, using the existing bevel as a reference, as you do with the others.  Jigs are used where the angle is variable, and the "good" ones are those which produce a variable angle you are comfortable with, rather than force you to use what they produce.  

Your set looks like you might be lucky, and have carbon steel, with, possibly forged pattern gouges with constant angles requiring no jig.  If the gouges are cylindrical, you are well advised to use other people's until you find a comfortable profile, then find out how they got it.  Once you've got it, use stones or (diamond) hones for that freshened edge, and save the steel you payed for.

(07-29-2020, 05:10 PM)badwhiskey Wrote: Some people use this shop-made jig for sharpening:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ws_JoC4BXOQ

I personally use the very popular Wolverine Sharpening Jig.  But I started with the just a grinder and the little shelf that came with it.

Like Bill said Club or classes and find someone who will take you along with them.

Also what Mouse said of honing is very good as well since it will save a lot of metal for you and $$ as well.

I have the same set up Whiskey uses and when I started I did not have it and did it the old way at winging it.
Problem for me is I NEVER got the same grind and had to continually learn what was going wrong (to my thinking of how the tool was not working the same) in getting the same cut every time.

If you wish you can send me your tools and I will sharpen them and you can try follow the same grind after.  Just send me a pm.
It is always the right time, to do the right thing.

Hi, I'm Arlin's proud wife! His brain trma & meds-give memory probs and has pain from injuries, but all is well materially & financially.  
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