Tiling shower enclosure, use Red Guard or...
#18
  Re: Tiling shower enclosure, use Red Guard or... by EightFingers (....use the 4-mil pl...)
I bought a tub of it today. I’ll have enough to put on five coats!
VH07V  
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#19
  Re: Tiling shower enclosure, use Red Guard or... by EightFingers (....use the 4-mil pl...)
(07-30-2020, 04:16 AM)EightFingers Wrote: ....use the 4-mil plastic behind the cement backer? I’m used to doing it with the plastic behind the backer, but I’m wondering if using the RedGuard would be better. I know you have to use a certain thin set with it, but I’m trying to understand how the tile actually bonds reliably to the RedGuard and is it really that much better than the “old” way.

Back to your point.

Tile bonds fine to RedGuard.
Is it better than the old way? Yes, much better. I wouldn't consider building a shower or surround without a sealer/primer like RedGuard.

Grout is porous and so is concrete backer board and "unglazed ceramic tile, RedGuard isn't porous.

The plastic is for condensation control, not as much for waterproofing. Still, there's lots of trains of thought about it. I've done it with and without.

Use polymer modified thin-set in wet areas. Sometimes it's called "Fortified". Modified and Fortified meet different standards but both are fine for wet areas. Fortified is a little more flexible and sometimes use on plywood substrates to help prevent cracking. It (modified or fortified) helps adhesion and helps reduce water intrusion.

Grout is basically grout but: I use "sanded" in wider grout lines and "unsanded" if you are setting with wider grout lines. Unsanded shrinks more and can look bad in wide grout lines, sanded holds up better. Think of it like aggregate in concrete. I think sanded looks better in general but unsanded has it's place, like in some mosaic applications and glass tile. Grout is translucent. Use white thin-set for light colored grout, light grey for darker grout and dark grey for the darkest grouts. I don't like wide grout lines or dark grout. The tile should be the star, not the grout. I try to stay 1/4" or under with grout lines. I think it looks neater. Although wider lines look pretty good on the long plank style tiles that resemble wood. The long tiles aren't really straight so the wide line kind of hides that. I would use a grout sealer in a wet area to help prevent staining. Just wipe it on and wipe it off and buff with a clean rag so you don't see the smears on the tile.
Neil Summers Home Inspections

Come to think of it, we used Bq/m^3 not pCi/l.  100Bq/m^3 is 2.7pCi/l. So several hundred Bq/m^2 is a whole lot different that several hundred pCi/l.

... Woodrow W. Smith
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#20
  Re: Tiling shower enclosure, use Red Guard or... by EightFingers (....use the 4-mil pl...)
Another couple things: You'll get better quality tile from a tile store than a borg. It's a bit more spendy but you'll have better selection and usually thicker tile. Tiles shops can easily take 15% off their list price. Just ask them, they'll do it. Try to stay with porcelain vs. ceramic. It's stronger. 9 times out of 10, you won't need a wet-saw. A snap tile cutter does a nicer job and is much faster and easier. Most odd cuts can be made with an angle grinder and a 4 to 4-1/4 diamond blade. You'll cut glass mosaic with a glass cutter or a glass cutting blade.

Stick with name brand grouts like Mapei. I've used "Superior" from The Tile Shop and didn't like working with it at all. The cheap thin-set at the borgs is fine. I like the Versa Bond stuff at Home Depot.
Neil Summers Home Inspections

Come to think of it, we used Bq/m^3 not pCi/l.  100Bq/m^3 is 2.7pCi/l. So several hundred Bq/m^2 is a whole lot different that several hundred pCi/l.

... Woodrow W. Smith
Reply
#21
  Re: Tiling shower enclosure, use Red Guard or... by EightFingers (....use the 4-mil pl...)
I'm a fan of Kerdi. Goes over common drywall. Dirt simple to use. But, expensive. Works wonderful.
Rocket Science is more fun when you actually have rockets. 

"The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people, it is an instrument for the people to restrain the government." -- Patrick Henry
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#22
  Re: Tiling shower enclosure, use Red Guard or... by EightFingers (....use the 4-mil pl...)
Snipe, I could never snap porcelain and I’ve tried. Finally bought a wet saw to cut it.

This go round, i’ll be using ceramic. Not my first choice, but there just isn’t much porcelain tile selection here.

As to grout, I’m planning on the grey which will hide mildew stains better. It’s been very satisfactory on my floors here. Also Hawaii has high humidity, so there may be long periods of dampness in the shower. I do have a small window high up which helps. A window on the adjoining wall helps with airflow too.

For mortar, I was reading the instructions on the Red Guard container and there was nothing about what mortar to use. The website is pretty specific, though.

I want to thank everyone for the advice, I appreciate it since this sort of thing is new to me.
VH07V  
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#23
  Re: RE: Tiling shower enclosure, use Red Guard or... by EightFingers (Snipe, I could never...)
(08-02-2020, 04:46 AM)EightFingers Wrote: Snipe, I could never snap porcelain and I’ve tried. Finally bought a wet saw to cut it.

This go round, i’ll be using ceramic. Not my first choice, but there just isn’t much porcelain tile selection here.

As to grout, I’m planning on the grey which will hide mildew stains better. It’s been very satisfactory on my floors here. Also Hawaii has high humidity, so there may be long periods of dampness in the shower. I do have a small window high up which helps. A window on the adjoining wall helps with airflow too.

For mortar, I was reading the instructions on the Red Guard container and there was nothing about what mortar to use. The website is pretty specific, though.

I want to thank everyone for the advice, I appreciate it since this sort of thing is new to me.

Then there's a problem and it's probably your cutter. I've used this one now for about 6 years and it's been very  good for the money. 2 showers, two tub surrounds. 5 bathroom floors and a laundry room. No problems whatsoever. I can't stand using a wetsaw unless absolutely necessary like for cutting narrow pieces like around niches. It's also necessary for marble as it won't snap clean. Generally I use the diamond blade on the angle cutter as my go-to for notches. The wetsaw is messy and time consuming but has it's place.

Kobalt tile cutter at Lowes
Neil Summers Home Inspections

Come to think of it, we used Bq/m^3 not pCi/l.  100Bq/m^3 is 2.7pCi/l. So several hundred Bq/m^2 is a whole lot different that several hundred pCi/l.

... Woodrow W. Smith
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#24
  Re: Tiling shower enclosure, use Red Guard or... by EightFingers (....use the 4-mil pl...)
That’s the type of snapper I tried to use. It worked great on ceramic, but porcelain just shattered. I’m thinking it was probably my technique.
VH07V  
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